Morris Animal Foundation
720 S. Colorado Blvd.
174-A
Denver CO 80246
One of our beautiful constituents.
Mission Statement

Morris Animal Foundation helps animals enjoy longer, healthier lives worldwide. The organization’s vision is a healthier tomorrow for animals. The Foundation improves the health and well-being of companion animals and wildlife by funding humane health studies and disseminating information about those studies.

Studies funded by the Foundation have led to advanced veterinary care for dogs, cats, horses, llamas/alpacas and hundreds of wildlife species. In total, the Foundation has invested more than $92 million toward more than 2,300 studies at the world’s most respected research institutions, colleges of veterinary medicine and zoos. These studies have led to better preventions, diagnostic tools, treatment protocols and even cures for what ails the world’s animals. Some of these breakthroughs have become industry gold standards and are used in every veterinary practice in the country.

A new program at Morris Animal Foundation is the Golden Retriever Lifetime Study. This is the largest and longest study ever conducted to advance veterinary medicine for dogs. The genetic, environmental and nutritional data from the 3,000 participating dogs will help us learn how to prevent cancer and other canine diseases. What is learned from the Golden Retrievers in the study will give all dogs a brighter, healthier future.

Morris Animal Foundation also encourages the scientific miracles of tomorrow through the Veterinary Student Scholars (VSS) program, which gives veterinary students hands-on exposure to veterinary medical research in hopes that some will consider research as a career where they are so critically needed. In the most recent fiscal year, Morris Animal Foundation awarded 25 Veterinary Student Scholars, for a total of $100,000. 

Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Dr. John Reddington DVM, PhD
Board Chair Walter George
Board Chair Company Affiliation G3 Consulting, LLC
History and Background
Year of Incorporation 1956
Financial Summary
Revenue Expense Area Graph

Comparing revenue to expenses shows how the organizations finances fluctuate over time.

Source: IRS Form 990

 Breakdown
Net Gain/Loss:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.
Statements
Mission Statement

Morris Animal Foundation helps animals enjoy longer, healthier lives worldwide. The organization’s vision is a healthier tomorrow for animals. The Foundation improves the health and well-being of companion animals and wildlife by funding humane health studies and disseminating information about those studies.

Studies funded by the Foundation have led to advanced veterinary care for dogs, cats, horses, llamas/alpacas and hundreds of wildlife species. In total, the Foundation has invested more than $92 million toward more than 2,300 studies at the world’s most respected research institutions, colleges of veterinary medicine and zoos. These studies have led to better preventions, diagnostic tools, treatment protocols and even cures for what ails the world’s animals. Some of these breakthroughs have become industry gold standards and are used in every veterinary practice in the country.

A new program at Morris Animal Foundation is the Golden Retriever Lifetime Study. This is the largest and longest study ever conducted to advance veterinary medicine for dogs. The genetic, environmental and nutritional data from the 3,000 participating dogs will help us learn how to prevent cancer and other canine diseases. What is learned from the Golden Retrievers in the study will give all dogs a brighter, healthier future.

Morris Animal Foundation also encourages the scientific miracles of tomorrow through the Veterinary Student Scholars (VSS) program, which gives veterinary students hands-on exposure to veterinary medical research in hopes that some will consider research as a career where they are so critically needed. In the most recent fiscal year, Morris Animal Foundation awarded 25 Veterinary Student Scholars, for a total of $100,000. 

Background Statement

Morris Animal Foundation started with a man who changed the course of veterinary medicine forever. And we have been building upon his legacy for almost 70 years.


When Dr. Mark L. Morris Sr. established Morris Animal Foundation in 1948, he envisioned a world in which scientific discoveries would transform the health of animals. His dream began with Buddy, who was among the first guide dogs in the United States.


Buddy suffered from kidney disease, and his owner, Morris Frank, then the national ambassador for the Seeing Eye, sought Dr. Morris’s advice. Dr. Morris created a special diet that dramatically improved Buddy’s health. He and his wife, Louise, canned the food in their kitchen. When they could no longer meet increasing demand from the veterinary community, they partnered with the Hill Packing Company to produce what later became the first Hill’s Pet Nutrition Prescription Diet. Dr. Morris used the royalties from that diet to establish Morris Animal Foundation, and the first two studies funded looked at nutrition in cats and dogs.


Dr. Morris became a pioneer in creating diets that could manage disease in animals and a leader who shaped the veterinary industry. 

 

Today, Morris Animal Foundation helps animals enjoy longer, healthier lives worldwide. The organization’s vision is a healthier tomorrow for animals. Morris Animal Foundation’s funding has led to advanced veterinary care for dogs, cats, horses, llamas/alpacas and hundreds of wildlife species. The Foundation has funded more than 2,350 studies, many of which have led to animal health breakthroughs in diagnostics, treatments, prevention and cures.
Impact Statement

Founded by a visionary veterinarian in 1948, Morris Animal Foundation today is a world leader in advancing veterinary research that protects, treats and cures animals on every continent. No other organization provides as much funding, in as many locations, for so many different species. 

Since our inception, Morris Animal Foundation has provided more than $97 million in support of 2,354 studies around the world. During this same time, more than 400 health problems have been studied, impacting more than 20,000 species. 

In Fiscal Year 2017, we have five initiatives: Healthy Animals, Future Scientists, Feline Infectious Peritonitis, Osteosarcoma, and the Golden Retriever Lifetime Study.
 
We plan on supporting hundreds of studies on dogs, cats, large animals, and wildlife because we believe that scientific discoveries will bring about a world in which animals live healthy lives. Morris Animal Foundation will also continue our groundbreaking Golden Retriever Lifetime Study, the first ever scientific study of this magnitude that we hope will lead to cures for many canine health problems, including cancer. Other 2017 initiatives include: a study on osteosarcoma in dogs that will help doctors find a cure for this debilitating cancer in children and a commitment to finding a cure for FIP, a debilitating virus common in cats.

Details about these and all of our programs are available at www.MorrisAnimalFoundation.org.

Needs Statement
Morris Animal Foundation has the current needs:
  1. $10,000,000 for the Golden Retriever Lifetime Study, the first ever longitudinal study in dogs whose purpose is to study and hopefully eradicate canine cancer.
  2. $1,000,000 for The Osteosarcoma Program, which is studying treatment options for this deadly canine cancer.
  3. $1,000,000 for our training scientists program, to build the pipeline for tomorrow's research breakthroughs.
  4. $400,000 for FIP Cure Initiative, our hope is to find a cure for this painful and almost always deadly feline disease.
  5. Volunteers to assist with fundraising events, specifically we would like to expand the Canine Cancer walks to more cities across the country. These events are entirely volunteer driven (with support from the Morris Animal Foundation.)
Service Categories
Animal-Related NEC
Fund Raising & Fund Distribution
Protection of Endangered Species
Areas of Service
National
International
CEO/Executive Director/Board Chair Statement

I am honored to be the new CEO at Morris Animal Foundation, an organization whose impact is unparalleled. In my short tenure here, I have seen firsthand how committed and passionate our community is. The staff, board, volunteers, pet owners, and professionals with whom we work are unwavering in their desire to make this world a better place for all animals, from aardvarks to zebus. It is humbling to be managing such an outstanding organization, doing such quality work.

I believe our strength is our reputation for excellence. For almost 70 years, we have helped to improve the heath and quality of life for more than 20,000 species around the world. We do great work and those in the animal community know it. Therefore, my goals as CEO are to ensure that we are able to continue that work and to spread the word outside of our existing networks. I want everyone to know about Morris Animal Foundation and the impact that we have on animals. More than likely, if you are an animal lover (of any species) we have helped to improve its life.
 
Morris Animal Foundation has the same challenges as any longstanding, stable organization. We must continue to analyze our programming to ensure that our work is relevant to today, while also staying true to Dr. Morris' vision. We must demonstrate our impact and importance to our community and stakeholders. We must continue to maintain the highest level of ethical operations and nonprofit business practices, as well as stay on top of quickly changing technologies to operate as efficiently and effectively as possible.
 
I am excited about the opportunities and the future ahead of us at Morris Animal Foundation and hope you will join me on this adventure. Sincerely, Dr. John Reddington
Programs
Description The Golden Retriever Lifetime Study, the first of its kind for dogs, is a longitudinal study of 3,000 Golden Retrievers for which the goal is to determine the risk factors, incidences and ultimately advise improved treatment for cancer and other diseases in this and other breeds of dogs.
Program Budget $25,000,000.00
Category Animal-Related, General/Other Veterinary Services
Population Served General/Unspecified, ,
Short-Term Success

Bring awareness to the possible causes and types of canine cancers, how they relate to human cancers, how they are sometimes breed specific and geographic make-up of canine cancer.

We currently have more than 3,000 Golden Retrievers from all 48 contiguous United States.  Our participants have already undergone at least one annual exam and we are collecting and analyzing the data. We are still at the relative beginning of the research portion of this program, so trends are just starting to emerge.
Long-Term Success

The purpose of the Golden Retriever Lifetime study is to identify the factors impacting the causes, cures, and treatments for many canine diseases and cancer.

Program Success Monitored By

Our 5-year strategic plan focuses on outcomes not output. Our focus is on funding translational medicine – lab bench to veterinarian. Key Performance Indicators have been established to measure outcomes.

Initial success will be the number of enrolled dogs, and participating veterinarians and owners.  Then we will start compiling data throughout the dogs lifetime.  Ideally, we find causes for the common cancers as well as other correlations between living conditions, lifestyle, diet, exercise, illness, genetics, etc.
Examples of Program Success Success from this project will give veterinarians, owners and researchers the best tools to avoid canine disease, treat it better and to ultimately cure.  The other far reaching outcome, although not the primary, is that this research will hopefully be translated to human medicine.
Description Outstanding scientists are critical for improving the health of our pets and saving endangered species from extinction. Unfortunately, veterinary scientists are quickly becoming an endangered species themselves as fewer people enter research careers. Morris Animal Foundation has a stated goal to fill the pipeline for veterinarian-scientists by providing training grants that include: a) funding to introduce outstanding veterinary students to animal health research through established mentors (Veterinary Student Scholars program); b) providing a training mechanism for veterinarians to pursue an advanced degree, PhD, in veterinary research; and c) creating postdoctoral (post-DVM or post-PhD) training fellowships in research to advance animal health. We anticipate awarding 25 Veterinary Student Scholarships and 40 Postdoctoral Training Awards in Fiscal Year 2017.
Program Budget $300,000.00
Category Animal-Related, General/Other Veterinary Services
Population Served Adults, ,
Short-Term Success Since its inception in 2005 the VSS program has graduated more than 235 students
Long-Term Success It has been shown that a veterinary student exposed to research by our VSS program is 52 times more likely to follow a career in research.
Program Success Monitored By Scholars are required to present their projects to MAF's scientific advisers and trustees at our scientific review meetings.
Examples of Program Success Our VSS has helped shaped the careers of many a promising student who has gone on to make a difference in the lives and health of the world's animals.
Description
FIP (Feline Infectious Peritonitis) is a viral disease of cats caused by certain strains of a virus called the feline coronavirus. The Foundation is strategically supporting studies that will lead to a cure to this almost always fatal disease.
 
Category Animal-Related, General/Other Animal Protection & Welfare
Population Served Other Named Groups, ,
Short-Term Success Morris Animal Foundation is currently funding four studies focused on FIP. 

In a recent study, our researchers identified mutations within the FIP virus highly correlated with disease progression. Two new studies focus on how these mutations help the virus invade critical cells of the immune system, allowing the virus to spread throughout a cat’s body. Understanding genetic components will help researchers identify targets for FIP diagnosis and treatment.

Our researchers are exploring an alternative approach – testing a novel, noninvasive vaccination strategy against feline enteric coronavirus, the nonlethal virus that can mutate into FIP virus. This new strategy will be especially valuable where cats are at increased risk for FIP, such as in catteries, shelters and rescue groups.  
 
FIP is a uniformly fatal disease and a leading cause of death in young cats. Despite the impact of this viral disease on cat health, no effective treatment is currently available. Our researchers are conducting a clinical trial to investigate if a novel antiviral drug can cure or greatly extend the lifespan and quality of life for client-owned cats with FIP.  
 
 
Long-Term Success

 

The overarching goal of the FIP program is to eradicate it. During the last 15 years, Morris Animal Foundation-funded studies focused on finding treatments and containment strategies for FIP. Recent successes helped zero in on FIP virus biology – specifically how an often-benign, highly contagious, feline gastrointestinal coronavirus mutates into the deadly FIP virus. Thanks to foundation funding, researchers now have a better understanding of the cat’s immune response to the FIP virus, opening up possibilities for breakthroughs in development of novel therapies and vaccines.
 

 

Program Success Monitored By Evaluation results may be published in Morris Animal Foundation materials, such as the Annual Report, and distributed to our networks. The Foundation also has staff dedicated to publicizing our programs and impact in the media. In addition, researchers present their findings at scholarly and animal welfare conferences, as appropriate.

As studies progress and upon completion, Morris Animal Foundation staff reviews them to identify accomplishments and impact. Researchers are also encouraged to provide feedback regarding the application process as well as the study itself. What's more, the Scientific Advisory Board is also encouraged to contribute their expertise regarding the quality of the studies as well as effectiveness of the program. They are able to do this as part of the selection meetings and individually by contacting Morris Animal Foundation staff directly.
Examples of Program Success

Short-term indicators of success are aligned with completion of studies on time and immediate impact of the research. Long-term success is measured by the publication of results in scholarly publications and citing of that research in other articles. Publishing can take five years or more, therefore the success of a study may not be known for a long period of time.

By all measures, this research is already a success. In just six months the lead investigator has already made progress. She has found several additional compounds that inhibit viral duplication, and is continuing her screening process. Her studies examining the cell entry enzyme have yielded more specifics on exactly how the virus and host enzyme interact.

Description
Morris Animal Foundation’s Healthy Animals Initiative champions innovative research that improves diagnostics, treatment, management and prevention for major health concerns in dogs, cats, horses and wildlife worldwide. Support for new research in animal health is critical and needs to keep pace with challenges posed by existing and emerging disease threats. This fundamental research area is the historic heart of our foundation.
 
Since 1948, Morris Animal Foundation has invested $100 million in more than 2,400 studies to improve the health and well-being of dogs, cats, horses, llamas/alpacas and wildlife. Through our Healthy Animals Initiative, we invest $3.2 million each year to create new knowledge and support for innovative ideas to advance veterinary medicine and continually advance the health of animals.  
Category Animal-Related, General/Other Animal Protection & Welfare
Population Served Other Named Groups, ,
Short-Term Success Short-term indicators of success are aligned with completion of studies on time, reporting of results, and immediate impact of the research.
Long-Term Success

It is our hope that our work leads to healthier, safer lives for all animals. We hope that our research enables animals to suffer less and have reduced amounts of pain when confronting a disease, recovering from surgery, or suffering from injury. We also hope that some diseases may be eradicated completely. 

The barometer of success for biomedical research is peer-reviewed publication, and Morris Animal Foundation is no different. We define and measure success of our funded studies by the publication of results (generally in peer-reviewed journals) and the subsequent article citations of those publications. 

To monitor this success, program staff keep track of publications and references using Google Scholar and Scopus, which provides an alert every time “Morris Animal Foundation” appears in a scholarly article, theses, book, abstract and court opinion from academic publishers, professional societies, online repositories, universities and other scholarly web sites. 

Program Success Monitored By As studies progress and upon completion, Morris Animal Foundation staff review them to identify accomplishments and impact. Researchers are also encouraged to provide feedback regarding the application process as well as the study itself. What's more, the Scientific Advisory Board is also encouraged to contribute their expertise regarding the quality of the studies as well as effectiveness of the program. They are able to do this as part of the project selection meetings and individually by contacting Morris Animal Foundation staff directly, and through blue ribbon advisory panels.
Examples of Program Success

Upper respiratory disease is a leading cause of euthanasia of shelter cats. Our researchers evaluated the effectiveness of two new treatment strategies in cats that failed to respond to conventional therapies. Both alleviate chronic URD signs and provide veterinarians with new treatment options.

 Despite an effective vaccine, rabies remains a significant health threat to dogs worldwide. Our researchers conducted a study of owned, free-roaming dogs in a rabies-endemic area in South Africa. They found a 70 percent vaccination rate in village dogs interrupts rabies transmission for up to a year and curbs outbreaks. These findings pave the way for  reducing rabies in dogs in Africa. 
 
Some horses have a high risk of developing polysaccharide storage myopathy. Signs range from sudden muscle cramping and damage, to an inability to stand. Our researchers identified two different types of PSSM and found a genetic mutation that causes PSSM1, a discovery that led to a genetic diagnostic test. 
Description Morris Animal Foundation’s Osteosarcoma Initiative focuses on innovative approaches to combat aggressive and fatally metastatic osteosarcoma in dogs. Stopping cancer from spreading is one of the major challenges faced by veterinary oncologists today. This is especially true for osteosarcoma, a type of malignant bone tumor. Unfortunately, almost all dogs diagnosed with osteosarcoma eventually are lost to metastatic disease.
Category Animal-Related, General/Other Animal Protection & Welfare
Population Served Other Named Groups, ,
Short-Term Success

Signaling pathways are groups of molecules that work together to control one or more cell functions, such as cell division or cell death. Recent studies have shown that the fibroblast growth factor signaling pathway is abnormally activated in a variety of human tumors. Our researchers are investigating the role of this pathway in bone cancer spread and its potential as a new therapeutic target.

Previously funded research found that the drug rapamycin showed promise in treating dogs with osteosarcoma. In the first study under our new Osteosarcoma Initiative, researchers refined the recommended dose of oral rapamycin for dogs with osteosarcoma. In two offshoot clinical trials, researchers are evaluating the effectiveness of oral rapamycin as a post-surgery therapy in client-owned dogs to combat metastatic disease. 
Long-Term Success

Since 1985, Morris Animal Foundation has invested more than $3 million in osteosarcoma research. Over a five-year period, the foundation is investing an additional $5 million to focus solely on testing promising new drugs and identifying new therapies to target metastatic disease, the primary cause of death in dogs with osteosarcoma. 

For more than 30 years, Morris Animal Foundation has funded studies to improve the quality of life for dogs with osteosarcoma. Recently funded studies have zeroed in on ways to optimize chemotherapy selection, control pain and find new therapeutic targets. While safe and effective treatment options currently are available to treat the primary cancer, better treatments are needed to stop metastasis or spread of the cancer. Thanks to our Osteosarcoma Initiative, researchers now have additional funding to explore new ways to stop or curb disease spread, and improve survival time for dogs with this aggressive cancer.
Program Success Monitored By

Morris Animal Foundation is supporting this ground-breaking initiative in several ways. The Foundation will oversee yearly scientific reviews of the studies in progress, coordinate overall marketing strategies and materials, and raise financial support. The research will be performed through the collaborative efforts of the Comparative Oncology Program of the National Cancer Institute, the Children’s Oncology Group, and aligned interests from the fields of animal and human health. Clinical trials will be considered and designed for both species by members of the Comparative Oncology Trials Consortium (COTC) and the Children’s Oncology Group.*

Examples of Program Success

Recent studies suggest that tumors release vesicles (membrane-bound collections of genes and proteins) and cell fragments into the bloodstream. When these vesicles and cell fragments reach the lungs, their presence attracts tumor cells to the area, initiating metastatic growth. Our researchers are studying how these products influence metastasis in hopes of finding new treatment targets.

Studies have shown that cancer gene signatures – patterns of how genes are expressed within individual tumors – can predict whether a tumor will respond to a specific chemotherapy. Determining a tumor’s gene signature allows patients to be treated with drugs most likely to provide the greatest benefit. Our researchers are testing a newly developed gene-expression model’s ability to determine the best chemotherapy protocol for dogs with bone cancer based on their tumor’s gene signature.
CEO Comments

There are many wonderful things happening at Morris Animal Foundation, it is difficult to know where to start. As you know, research is often a very slow process, and success usually takes place in incremental steps over many years. That is why Morris Animal Foundation's longevity is so important. We recognize that the work of our researchers is a long, painstaking process. We are glad to support them in their work and know that patience is the key to making big advances in research. As we know, the "miracle" result is usually decades in the making with contributions by many, many individuals.

 While the new glow of the Golden Retriever Lifetime Study has started to fade, the possibilities of this ground breaking study continue to excite us at Morris Animal Foundation.  We have started to track the data of our canine participants and are analyzing it for trends. It's been a fascinating process to witness the true nature of research--data collection and analysis. (I know what you're thinking and yes, I did use the word fascinating. There are some of us at the office who are genuinely excited about working with the data.) We are convinced that the cure for canine cancer is going to emerge from those numbers. Stay tuned...
 
Our biggest challenge is the dearth of great research projects out there. Without fail, we are only able to fund a small portion of quality proposals for every open grants cycle. We are doing our best to meet this need, but know that there is much more work to be done. It is our goal to one day be able to approve proposal that meets our high standards. 
Executive Director/CEO
Executive Director Dr. John Reddington DVM, PhD
Term Start May 2016
Experience Dr. John Reddington joined Morris Animal Foundation in 2016 as its president and CEO. A veterinarian and researcher by training, John has nearly 30 years experience in the animal and human health industries. As a long-time pet owner, he always has had a love for animals and, at the foundation, is able to combine that with a passion for science to improve the lives of animals around the world.

Prior to joining the foundation, John worked as a consultant for the biopharma industry, and was previously chief operating officer for Cambridge Biomedical Inc. John has helped to establish and grow a number of companies, and has held numerous leadership, and research and development roles. He received his DVM and PhD in immunology from Washington State University. John and his wife, Anne, live in Denver.
Co-CEO/Executive Director
Term Start
Compensation Last Year
Former CEOs
NameTerm
Dr. David Haworth DVM,PhDJune 2011 - Oct 2015
Senior Staff
Title Chief Operating Officer
Experience/Biography  Kathryn Holm joined Morris Animal Foundation in 2015 as its chief operating officer. Kathryn has an extensive background in nonprofit administration including several foundations. Her experience includes formulating financial plans and policies: accounting, audit, budget, and portfolio management. Kathryn has a B.S. in business from Regis University and an M.B.A. from Franklin University. She is a founding member of the Colorado Nonprofit Financial Peers and currently serves as the board president of the Single Volunteers of Greater Denver. Kathryn resides in Denver with her two rescue dogs, Sebocca and Athena.
Staff
Paid Full-Time Staff 32
Paid Part-Time Staff 2
Volunteers 201
Paid Contractors 1
Retention Rate 68%
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Semi-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Semi-Annually
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Semi-Annually
Plans & Policies
Organization Has a Fundraising Plan Yes
Organization Has a Strategic Plan Yes
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Organization Policy and Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistleblower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Collaborations

Morris Animal Foundation is fortunate to be partnering with a number of organizations in order to implement our programs. We call all 29 veterinarian schools located in the United States our partners. Leadership and faculty from the schools assist in the Morris Animal Foundation research program by participating in our Scientific Advisory Boards; committing time and financial resources to supporting student grantees; and hosting Foundation staff as part of classes and other appropriate educational events. 

The Foundation also collaborates with similar organizations to advance knowledge on targeted animal health issues. For example, Morris Animal Foundation is a founding member of the Cat Health Network, with the Winn Feline Foundation, the American Association of Feline Practitioners, and the American Veterinary Medical Foundation. The coalition’s purpose is to increase the amount of research funding for cats, specifically by identifying various genetic aspects of feline diseases. 

Last, other organizations tap our expertise in grants administration by asking Morris Animal Foundation to manage a research program for them. One such example is the Human Animal Bond Research Initiative, whose focus is the positive health impacts of animals on people. 

Government Licenses
Is your organization licensed by the government? No
CEO Comments


Board Chair
Board Chair Walter George
Company Affiliation G3 Consulting, LLC
Term July 2016 to June 2019
Board Members
NameAffiliation
Deborah Davenport DVM, MS, DACVIMHill's Pet Nutrition
Amy Eagle-Thompson Retired
Bob Gain BlackRock
Walter George G3 Consulting, LLC
Colin Giles PhD, MRCVSNexvet Biopharma
Amy Hunkeler DVM, DACVOEye Care for Animals
Wendy Knudsen Cequel III
Richard Lichter Newbury Partners
Patrick O. Long DVMCamelid Healthcare Services
Jonna Mazet DVM, MPVM, PhDUC Davis One Health Institute
Bette M. Morris Ph.D.Retired
David Morris CEO, Zupreem
Cynthia L. Morris Peterson-Arne
David Petrie Blue Buffalo Co.
Richard Swanson Retired
Jim Tedford Society of Animal Welfare Administration
Stanley M. Teeter DVMRetired
Bob Vetere American Pet Products Association
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 17
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 11
Female 7
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 4
Board Meeting Attendance % 80%
Written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 10%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 3
Standing Committees
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Investment
CEO Comments
Morris Animal Foundation’s staff and our veterinary scientist partners work hard every day to find new ways to protect, treat and cure companion animals and wildlife from diseases that currently have little hope. Our Foundation was founded almost 70 years ago by a visionary veterinarian named Mark Morris Sr. At that time, dogs were suffering and dying from kidney and liver ailments due to the poor quality food available to owners. Dr. Morris realized that only through scientific research could he determine the dietary needs specific to dogs, and make appropriate changes in their food. He subsequently created the Foundation that bears his name in order to support research solely for the benefit of animals and to improve their health and well being.

Veterinary medicine has come a long way since 1948, but our companion animals, horses and wildlife are still experiencing diseases and conditions both shared and not shared by humans. Morris Animal Foundation’s mission is to address those diseases and in doing so, create hope for a healthier tomorrow for animals.

Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01, 2016
Fiscal Year End June 30, 2017
Projected Revenue $14,939,489
Projected Expenses $14,939,489
Endowment Value $70,000,000
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage 3
Audit Documents
IRS Letter of Exemption
Foundation Comments
  • FYE 6/30/2015, 2014, 2013: Financial data reported using IRS Form 990.
  • Foundation/corporate revenue line item may include contributions from individuals. 
Detailed Financials
 
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$9,806,280$8,063,763$2,590,674
Government Contributions$0$0$0
Federal----$0
State----$0
Local----$0
Unspecified$0$0$0
Individual Contributions----$8,037,655
$0$0$0
$358,668$265,395$1,423
Investment Income, Net of Losses$1,378,866$2,274,003$3,365,802
Membership Dues$0$0$0
Special Events$0$38,210$128,339
Revenue In-Kind$0$0$0
Other$210,030$364,536$167,582
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$11,519,497$10,642,725$10,162,752
Administration Expense$1,167,496$733,716$752,627
Fundraising Expense$2,247,097$2,104,106$1,972,104
Payments to Affiliates----$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.790.821.08
Program Expense/Total Expenses77%79%79%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue23%26%18%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$91,171,668$86,340,689$80,609,845
Current Assets$5,031,997$2,133,830$1,883,039
Long-Term Liabilities$909,780$871,483$211,080
Current Liabilities$4,989,339$3,470,171$3,579,594
Total Net Assets$85,272,549$81,999,035$76,819,171
Short-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities1.010.610.53
Long-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets1%1%0%
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountMark & Bette Morris Family Foundation $1,711,000 --Morris Family Foundation $2,089,000
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountPETCO Foundation $1,250,000 --Petco Foundation $904,742
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountIndividual Donor $572,772 --Karl Smith Estate $875,000
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years No
Organization Comments Morris Animal Foundation is a financially scaleable and sustainable organization, with a balanced and diversified funding model. Adhering to nonprofit best practices, nearly half of the Foundation's annual income derives from individual contributions, in addition to these other revenue streams: for-profit organizations, foundations, events, workplace giving campaigns, investment pool draw, estate distributions, and other.
Organization Name Morris Animal Foundation
Address 720 S. Colorado Blvd.
174-A
Denver, CO 80246
Primary Phone (800) 243-2345
CEO/Executive Director Dr. John Reddington DVM, PhD
Board Chair Walter George
Board Chair Company Affiliation G3 Consulting, LLC
Year of Incorporation 1956