Boy Scouts of America, Heart of America Council
10210 Holmes Road
Kansas City MO 64131-4212
Web and Phone Contact
Telephone (816) 9429333
Mission Statement
It is the mission of the Heart of America Council, Boy Scouts of America, to prepare young people of eastern Kansas and western Missouri to make ethical choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law. The Scout Oath: On my honor, I will do my best to do my duty to God and my country; and to obey the Scout Law; to help other people at all times; to keep myself physically strong, mentally awake and morally straight. The Scout Law: A Scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean, and reverent.
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Kendrick J.E. Miller
Board Chair Mr. Zachary Shafran
Board Chair Company Affiliation Waddell & Reed
History and Background
Year of Incorporation 1910
Financial Summary
Revenue Expense Area Graph

Comparing revenue to expenses shows how the organizations finances fluctuate over time.

Source: IRS Form 990

 Breakdown
Net Gain/Loss:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.
Statements
Mission Statement It is the mission of the Heart of America Council, Boy Scouts of America, to prepare young people of eastern Kansas and western Missouri to make ethical choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law. The Scout Oath: On my honor, I will do my best to do my duty to God and my country; and to obey the Scout Law; to help other people at all times; to keep myself physically strong, mentally awake and morally straight. The Scout Law: A Scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean, and reverent.
Background Statement
The Scouting program began in Kansas City in 1910, the same year it began in the United States. Until 1974 two councils served the community, the Kaw Council and the Kansas City Area Council. They merged to become the Heart of America Council to deliver the Scouting program more efficiently. Scouting in the Heart of America Council is nationally recognized for its impact in the urban core, the large number of Scouts who attend camp (18,477 in 2016) and the number of Boy Scouts achieving the rank of Eagle Scout (898 in 2016). 
Impact Statement
Over the years, the social capital of communities in the United States has decreased. A 2015 paper released by City Observatory revealed that nearly a third of Americans have no interaction with their neighbors. This can stunt a community's sense of identity, security, and creativity.
 
Boy Scouts provides young people with an opportunity to reconnect with their families and their community. The Heart of America Council, which oversees Boy Scout programming in the 19 counties in and around Kansas City, successfully brings together more than 14,000 volunteers to work with over 29,000 young people. Scouting provides young people with activities designed to develop leadership, and teamwork. This program impacts not only the Scouts, but the future of the community. Research conducted by Baylor University has shown that Eagle Scouts are more likely than non-Scouts to be leaders in their communities.

There are many things the Heart of America Council is proud that it achieved with the help of our volunteers and community partners in 2016. Some highlights are:
  1. The Heart of America Council achieved year‐end traditional Cub Scout membership growth with 9 out of 16 Districts achieving Cub Scout growth. 
  2. Through the Council Endowment fund provided $395,000 in capital project funding for Bartle and Naish Scout Reservations
  3. Held our Inaugural Dig Day: 18,042 plants planted in 106 flower beds in Kansas City, Missouri, saving the Parks Department several months of work.
We began the first year of a new strategic plan for 2016-2018. Some of our goals of the strategic plan include the following:
  •  Membership growth across all programs by 1% 
  • Launch a capital campaign to raise $15 million in capital projects and $6 million in deferred gifts over the next 3 years
  • Improve yearly advancement to 71% for Cub Scouts and 53% for Boy Scouts
Needs Statement

The Heart of America Council relies on our annual fundraising drive and activity fees to generate operating income. Our philosophy on youth activity fees is to charge only the direct costs of offering that specific program. 

The top three funding needs are:  
  1. Annual funds - provide for staffing and administrative needs as well as maintaining our facilities, program and training development and membership outreach.
  2. Urban Scouting program - provides Scouting to youth in the urban core. Boys can be involved regardless of their socio-economic level. Additional funding would allow us to provide the Urban Scouting program to additional young people in the inner city neighborhoods.
  3. Capital funding - needed to maintain and expand our camping facilities.
Service Categories
Boy Scouts Of America
Scouting Organizations
Elementary & Secondary Schools
Areas of Service
MO - Jackson County
MO - Clay County
MO - Platte County
KS - Wyandotte County
KS - Johnson County
MO - Eastern Jackson Co
MO - Jackson County Urban Core
KS - Wyandotte County Urban Core
CEO/Executive Director/Board Chair Statement

Everyone benefits when Scouting is at its best: Scouts advance, grow and mature; family relationships flourish, and adult volunteers have the rewarding experience of making a difference in lives of young people. 

Our strength is in our strong management staff and active board, which together provide strong leadership and direction for the organization. Scouting in the Heart of America Council provides a strong foundation of leadership, service and community for tens of thousands of youth in our area.  Scouting and the Heart of America Council reintroduces young people and their families to adventure in the great outdoors. The outdoors provides an incredible classroom that develops the skills needed to become productive adults in the 21st Century.

Strong organizational governance is crucial not only in establishing our strategic direction but also ensuring that we meet the strictest of ethical standards in achieving our mission. The Heart of America Council is governed by an active executive board. Our executive committee  and the full board meet on alternate months to review our council’s operations and to assist the management staff in setting goals & expectations.

 
One challenge that faces an organization that has had strong roots in Kansas City for 106 years is how we can stay relevant to today's communities, while still honoring our past. The Heart of America Council's strategy to take on this challenge is to increase membership and add new board members. We want to diversify our membership and board, and assess our programs from the perspectives of long-time users, as well as new Scouts and board members. This will allow us to create activities that are meaningful to all young people in Kansas City who are interested in camping and community service.  
Programs
Description A year-round program uniquely designed to meet the needs of boys and their parents. Challenging activities promote character development and physical fitness. This family centered program promotes teamwork and cooperation through positive peer group interaction. Through adult interactions and leadership, boys learn compassion, courage, honesty and respect at weekly den or pack meetings.
Category Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years), ,
Short-Term Success Short-term success is defined by Cub Scouts and their family’s participation and retention in exciting, well planned, pack and council-sponsored programs provided by caring, trained leaders. Council programs the Cub Scouts attend should include a Cub Scout Family Campout, and a summer camp experience. Cub Scouts should complete the rank advancement appropriate for their grade level. Ongoing participation in a quality program will position Cub Scouts to achieve the long-term outcomes offered by our program, as researched by our National Council. Training, program, advancement and quality unit metrics are monitored on an ongoing basis for each Cub Scout pack in the Heart of America Council.
Long-Term Success
  • Boys will develop an improved sense of self worth and usefulness.
  • Boys will develop caring relationships with parents, other adults and their friends.
  • Boys will develop a desire to learn and expand their knowledge of the world.
  • Boys will develop the needed social skills and competencies to be socially adept.
Program Success Monitored By Our national organization has worked with Harris Interactive over the past decade to outcome effectiveness of the Scouting program in serving the needs of young people. A national outcome study conducted by Louis Harris and Associates in 1998, “A Year in the Life of a… Cub Scout, Boy Scout, Venturer” was designed to establish what about BSA programs lead to positive outcomes. General findings established that the Cub Scout program met or exceeded their expectations. The study found that Cub Scouting builds strong personal values and character; increases a positive sense of self worth; fosters caring and nurturing relationships with parents, adults, and peers; and builds social adeptness.
Examples of Program Success Surveys conducted with the help of Louis Harris and Associates show that on average 94% of Cubs Scout parents indicate that their child has grown in his sense of self-worth and usefulness. The program provides the ability to give back through community service. This teaches the young man that he is valued by his community and can play a productive role in it. The survey also indicated that 92% of parents agree that the program improves their child’s life by building relationship with others. He interacts with den leaders that are not his parents and also with other boys who might not live close by. It places them in a position to work with others.
Description This is a boy led and planned program mentored by adult leadership. These young men elect peer leadership and plan programs that teach them how to set goals and implement tasks to accomplish these goals. The advancement program promotes personal growth, leadership development and improved self-esteem. Community service develops awareness and appreciation of each boy’s role in society.
Category Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years), ,
Short-Term Success Short-term success is defined by Boy Scouts and their family’s participation and retention in exciting, well planned, troop and council-sponsored programs provided by caring, trained leaders who mentor the youth members as they plan and execute their activities. This ensures leadership development and a program relevant to Boy Scouts’ interests. Council programs the Boy Scouts attend should include a Boy Scout District Camporees, and a summer camp experience. Boy Scouts should complete rank advancement at an appropriate pace and work regularly on merit badges required for rank advancement as well as one that are of specific interest to them. Ongoing participation in a quality program will position Boy Scouts to achieve the long-term outcomes offered by our program, as researched by our National Council. Training, program, advancement and quality unit metrics are monitored on an ongoing basis for each Boy Scout troop in the Heart of America Council.
Long-Term Success
  • Young men will develop personal values and character by participating in Boy Scouts.
  • Boy Scouts will grow in their sense of self-worth and usefulness.
  • These young men will learn and develop ways to use their time creatively and productively.
  • Boy Scouts will also learn the skills needed to work with others and interact in a confident manner.
Program Success Monitored By Our national organization has worked with Harris Interactive over the past decade to outcome effectiveness of the Scouting program in serving the needs of young people. A national outcome study conducted by Louis Harris and Associates in 1998, “A Year in the Life of a… Cub Scout, Boy Scout, Venturer” was designed to establish what about BSA programs lead to positive outcomes. General findings established that the Boy Scout program met or exceeded their expectations. The study found that Boy Scouting builds strong personal values and character; increases a positive sense of self worth; fosters caring and nurturing relationships with parents, adults, and peers; and builds social adeptness.
Examples of Program Success Our council is consistently among the national leaders in the number of young men achieving the rank of Eagle Scout. We also lead the nation in the percentage of Boy Scouts attending summer camp,an important facet of our program. The Louis Harris survey of Boy Scouts show that 78% of these young men agree that the program has improved their self worth and confidence. 85% of Boy Scouts agree that they develop positive relationships with adults and peers while in the organization.
Description Through positive experiences, this program develops young men and women into responsible caring adults. Programs revolve around hobbies, community service and the outdoors,and include interest areas such as skiing, backpacking and geology just to name a few. Organizations use the program for its leadership structure and training program that allows young people to lead. This program also teaches teens how to mentor young people in the community.
Category Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years), ,
Short-Term Success Short-term success is defined by Venturers’ participation and retention in exciting, well planned, crew and council-sponsored programs provided through caring, trained leaders who mentor the youth members as they plan and execute their activities. Venturers should play an active role in planning and conducting their program activities. This ensures leadership development and a program relevant to Venturers’ interests. Council programs the Venturers attend should include a summer camp experience and one of two weekend events. Ongoing participation in a quality program will position Boy Scouts to achieve the long-term outcomes offered by our program, as researched by our National Council. Training, program, advancement and quality unit metrics are monitored on an ongoing basis for each Venture crew in the Heart of America Council.
Long-Term Success

  • Young men and women will learn the skills needed to make ethical decisions.
  • Young men and women will gain personal confidence.
  • Young men and women will benefit from caring relationships with other adults and their peers. 

Program Success Monitored By Our national organization has worked with Harris Interactive over the past decade to outcome effectiveness of the Scouting program in serving the needs of young people. A national outcome study conducted by Louis Harris and Associates in 1998, “A Year in the Life of a… Cub Scout, Boy Scout, Venturer” was designed to establish what about BSA programs lead to positive outcomes. General findings established that the Venture program met or exceeded their expectations. The study found that Venturing builds strong personal values and character; increases a positive sense of self worth; fosters caring and nurturing relationships with parents, adults, and peers; and builds social adeptness.
Examples of Program Success The Louis Harris survey indicated that the 79% of the youth who participate in this program agree that activities and situations that they experience as a Venturer teaches them and provides the tools to help them make ethical decisions. Also, 90% of them indicated that the program does improve relationships with other caring adults, peers and parents.
Description This program is an in-school program that develops life skills in today’s young people. Older students develop career interest profiles and skills such as resume writing and interviewing techniques as they move into high school. Adult interaction happens in a business-based Exploring Post or through career speakers that present to students at local schools.
Category Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years), ,
Short-Term Success
  • Classroom teachers receive training
  • Classroom teachers use the lesson plans correctly in the classroom
  • All schools conduct the career interest survey.
  • Increase the number of business based Exploring posts.
Long-Term Success
  • Learning for Life students will be more well behaved in the classroom.
  • Student scores will improve when the Learning for Life curriculum is used in conjunction with current classroom lesson plans.
Program Success Monitored By We rely on our teachers and businesses to give us updates on the programs on a quarterly basis. This helps us assess their needs to ensure that the programs are being implemented correctly for the benefits of today’s students.
Examples of Program Success Students in the Learning for Life classes showed a 20% gain in appropriate responses from the pre test to the post test. The non LFL classes’ saw only a 6% gain. LFL students scored higher on lessons taught with materials in their classrooms. Teachers reported an increase in positive student behavior.
Description This educational program teaches all members of the organization the importance of resisting, recognizing, and reporting child abuse. Training educates on all forms of abuse and is age specific for all audiences. Understanding what abuse is begins the process of prevention and recognition.
Category Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Adults, ,
Short-Term Success All Scouts and their parents are educated on child abuse. All Scouting leaders are required to complete Youth Protection Training before they are registered leaders in the Boy Scouts of America. All youth members are required to review with their parents the first part of each handbook which education on the forms of child abuse an how to recognize and report it. This is the first requirement for all youth advancement. In addition to the handbook requirement, age appropriate videos are available to be shown in a group setting. For adults, they must go to the training website and take the online Youth Protection Training. This educates them on their responsibilities as a leader in the organization when it comes to dealing with abuse. Educating both our youth and adult volunteers is the best why to prevent or stop abuse of children in any form.
Long-Term Success Young people will be protected from predators. Young people in need will be identified and protected.
Program Success Monitored By Verification of training records. Training is conducted on line and is required before any adult can register as a leader in the Boy Scouts of America. It is free for all to take. The system updates the registration records of the youth or adult that has completed training.
Examples of Program Success Sexual abuse of children in the organization is virtually non-existent. Adult volunteers willingly report all situations of suspected abuse for review and action. Background checks of all leaders assist the organization in its ability to protect young people. All adults currently registered, or applying for registration in the Boy Scouts of America must complete youth protection training before participating in any program activities. No exceptions allowed.   
CEO Comments
The Heart of America Council, BSA, is recognized as one of Scouting's premiere councils. Each year, we take great pride in achieving Gold Journey to Excellence status (the highest status a council can achieve, based on the national Boy Scouts of America evaluation criteria). Our high quality program and the strongest camping record in the nation helps to drive our growth in youth membership.   
 
Our success and resulting growth also provides challenges. Our camps are filled to capacity and capital improvements are needed ensure that all young people in the future will have the opportunity to participate in the promise of adventure in the outdoors. Our need for money to provide camperships - free registration for camp - to Scouts from disadvantaged homes continues to grow. Funding is also needed to provide for the professional and support staff needed to ensure that our 14,255 adult volunteers are trained and prepared to offer the highest quality program possible. Your donations makes Scouting happen in the Heart of America Council.   
Executive Director/CEO
Executive Director Mr. Kendrick J.E. Miller
Term Start Feb 2011
Experience
Kenn Miller started his tenure as the new Scout Executive of the Heart of America Council, Boy Scouts of America on February 1, 2011. As the Council’s Chief Executive Officer, he provides leadership to an organization that brings Scouting to more than 30,730 youth members through the work of more than 14,800 adult volunteers in a 19-county region in and around the Kansas City metropolitan area.
Miller came to Kansas City with 26 years of experience as an executive for the Boy Scouts of America. Most recently he was based in Chicago and served as the Deputy Regional Director for the National Council of the Boy Scouts of America.

Kenn, an Eagle Scout himself, has extensive experience with the Scouting outdoor program. He has also served as the Scout Executive for two other councils. Kenn is married with three children, two daughters and an Eagle Scout son.
Co-CEO/Executive Director
Term Start 0
Compensation Last Year
Former CEOs
NameTerm
Mr. Timothy C. Bugg May 2005 - Jan 2011
Mr. James J Terry Jr.Sept 1999 - May 2005
Senior Staff
Title Director of Development
Experience/Biography  

Jeromy Rutledge started as the Director of Development for the Heart of America Council, BSA on May 1, 2014 and is responsible for all donor-related revenue streams for the Council. Prior to his role at the Council, he served the prior 5 years as the Director of Corporate and Community Relations for Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Kansas City. As an 18 year veteran of the corporate Business Development field and long-time Boy Scout volunteer, Jeromy combines his passion for the mission with professional relationship development skillset. Jeromy is the father of two Eagle Scouts, and serves as a volunteer Assistant Scoutmaster for Troop 10 in Leawood, KS.

Title CFO
Title Deputy Scout Executive
Experience/Biography Matt moved to the Heart of America Council in 2016 after a very successful tenure as the Scout Executive of Chippewa Valley Council in Eau Claire, Wisconscin. Matt has particular expertise in membership development and fundraising, and will be bringing these talents to the Deputy Scout Executive position, which is responsible for field service operations, marketing, and technology.
Staff
Paid Full-Time Staff 67
Paid Part-Time Staff 34
Volunteers 14255
Paid Contractors 7
Retention Rate 76%
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Quarterly
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Quarterly
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Plans & Policies
Organization Has a Fundraising Plan Yes
Organization Has a Strategic Plan Yes
Management Succession Plan No
Organization Policy and Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistleblower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Collaborations
We collaborate with 617 community organizations that help us deliver the Scouting program across our 19-county service area. All programs must be chartered to an outside organization such as a church, service club, business or school. We rely on these organizations to assist in recruiting Scouts and volunteers. We believe it's vital that Boy Scout programming is community-led, but it is equally important that we provide guidance and resources to ensure that everyone gets a quality experience consistent with the Boy Scout tradition. To that end, we train all volunteers, fill in when more volunteers are needed, maintain campgrounds for all Scouts to use, and provide financial support as needed.
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Affiliate/Chapter of National Organization (i.e. Girl Scouts of the USA, American Red Cross, etc.) - Affiliate/chapter1910
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Gold Record for Endowment GrowthBoy Scouts of America2008
National President’s Award for Marketing ExcellenceBoy Scouts of America2008
Regional President’s Award for Scoutreach EffortsCentral Region, Boy Scouts of America2007
Quality Council CertificationBoy Scouts of America 2007
Quality Council CertificationBoy Scouts of America 2006
Quality Council CerificationBoy Scouts of America2008
Quality Council CertificationBoy Scouts of America2009
National President's Marketing AwardBoy Scouts of America2009
Fiscally Sustainable CouncilBoy Scouts of America2008
Fiscally Sustainable CouncilBoy Scouts of America2009
Gold Record for Endowment GrowthBoy Scouts of America2009
National Quality CouncilNational Council, Boy Scouts of America2010
Journey To Excellence GoldBoy Scouts of America2011
Journey To Excellence GoldBoy Scouts of America2012
Journey To Excellence GoldBoy Scouts of America2013
Journey To Excellence GoldBoy Scouts of America2014
Journey to Excellence GoldBoy Scouts of America2015
Journey to Excellence GoldBoy Scouts of America2016
Government Licenses
Is your organization licensed by the government? No
CEO Comments We are one of 273 geographic councils affiliated with the National Council, Boy Scouts of America, serving families in all states as well as U.S. citizens and military families stationed worldwide. Both our National and local board members are elected yearly.  Membership on our board requires active participation, and every board member is on at least one subcommittee. These subcommittees provide oversight and guidance for all Scouting activities. 
Board Chair
Board Chair Mr. Zachary Shafran
Company Affiliation Waddell & Reed
Term Jan 2017 to Jan 2019
Board Members
NameAffiliation
Mr Duane Anstaett
Mr. Perry Atha Atronix Alarms
Mr. Nick Badgerow Spencer Fane
Mr. Rob Baker Baker Communication Associates
Mr. Tom Barnett Mid-America Merchandising, Inc.
Mr. James H. Bernard Jr.Slagel, Bernard & Gorman
Mr. William Blessing Retired
Mr Bob Bloss
Mr. Rick Boeshaar Private Investments
Mr. Henry Bond Lockton Insurance
Mr. Scott Boswell The Commerce Trust Company
Mr. Scott Braden Commerce Bank
Mr. Michael Brown Euronet Worldwide Inc
Mr. Doug Butcher Black & Veatch
Judge Patrick Campbell Jackson County Circuit Court Judge
Mr. David Chinnery Adams Dairy Bank
Mr. Gary V. Cover Cover Law Office
Mr. Jeremy Croucher KPMG
Mr. Brad Derusseau Cinema Scene
Ms. Christa Dubill NBC Action News
Mr. Terrence P. Dunn J. E. Dunn
Mr. William Easley Prosperity Advisory Group
Mr. Marc Elkins Cerner Corporation
Mr. William Esry Blue Ridge Bank & Trust
Mr. Bill Essmann Adams Pointe Conference Center
Mr. Wayne Feuerborn HNTB Architecture
Mr. Randy Florence Lafayette Co. Sheriff's Dept.
Mr. David Forsee Brookside Capital LLC
Mr. David M. Fowler KPMG
Mr. David Frantze Stinson Morrison Hecker
Mr. Thomas Freeman UBS Financial Services
Mr. Doug Furnell Western Metal
Judge Kenny Garrett Jackson County Circuit Court
Mr. Gregg Givens DST Systems, Inc.
Dr. Gary Groff DDS
Mr. Aaron Guest Cerner Corp.
Mr. Casey Halsey J. E. Dunn
Mr. Lester Ham ARO
Mr. James W. Hayes Sprint
Mr John Heiman
Dr. Jim Hinson Independence Board of Education
Mr. Chris Hodgdon Hodgdon Powder Company
Mr. Charles J. Hoffman Hoffman Management Corp.
Mr. James Hogan Curry Investment Co
Lynn Houston community volunteer
Mr. Clifford W. Illig Cerner
Mr. Tom Johnson Brotherhood Bank and Trust
Dr. Timothy Johnson Children's Mercy Pediatric Care Network
Mr. Brad Jones
Mr. Mark Jorgenson U S Bank
Mr. Dan Kerling Sprint
Mr. Rob Kim AMC Entertainment
Mr. Jason Lehtinen Mariner Holdings
Mr Jason Lehtinen
Mr. Thomas W. Lenz MatrixPointe
Mr. David M. Lockton The Lockton Companies
Mr. Richard L. Martin Martin, Leigh, laws, & Fritzler, PC
Mr. John C. Martin PricewaterhouseCoopers, LLP
Mr. Rick McWhirt ECA
Mr. Terry K. Miller HNTB
Mr. David Neihart Wells Fargo Advisors
Mr. Steven Norris UMKC Foundation
Mr Steven Norris
Mr. Frank Oddo Citywide Maintenance
Mr. John Petersen Polsinelli
Mrs. Jeanette Prenger ECCO Select
Mr Bruce Priday
Mr. Michael Rainen Rainen Companies
Mr Charles Rhoades M.D
Mr. Gregg Riess Grant Thornton
Mr. Chris Ross HNTB
Mr. Howard Scott IIHiland Dairy
Ms. Mahnaz Shabbir Shabbir Advisors
Mr. Zachary Shafran Waddell & Reed
Hon. Keith Sickendick Federal Judge
Mr. Bruce Snyder Ernst & Young
Robin Stubenhofer Security Administrations - Honeywell
Mr. Charles Tetrick Walz Tetrick Advertising
Mr Dave Timpe
Mr. Tucker Trotter Dimensional Innovations
Mr Tucker Trotter
Mr Richard VanAuken
Mr. Ken Wagner Heritage Tractor, Inc.
Mr. Dennis Walsh Walsh Washburn
Mr. Wayne R. Weimer Retired
Mr. Bruce White The Lockton Companies
Mr. Kurt Wiedeman Reeves-Wiedeman Company
Mr. Ted Wilson community volunteer
Mr. Brent Worley Wall Ties & Forms
Mr. Frank Wright IVCapital Federal Savings
Mr. David Yeamans Burns & McDonnell
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 92
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 22 Other
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 116
Female 1
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 1
Board Term Limits 1
Board Meeting Attendance % 46%
Written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 7%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 5
Standing Committees
Advisory Board / Advisory Council
Board Governance
Community Outreach / Community Relations
Endowment
Executive
Finance
Marketing
Membership
Nominating
Operations
Program / Program Planning
Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction
Advisory Board Members
NameAffiliation
Harvey S. Bodker Bodker Realty , Inc.
Lloyd J. Briggs Retired
Mr. Douglas M. Briggs First State Bank & Trust
John T. Carper Retired
Mr. William Cheek Embarq Corporation
Mr. Sam L. Colville Retired
Robert Cunningham Retired
Mr. Vincent P. Dasta DST Realty
Bruce E. Davis Park Investment Inc.
Mr. John A. Dillingham Dillingham Enterprises
Arthur J Elman MDRetired
Mr. David A. Fenley Husch Blackwell
Jerry P. Fogel Kessinger Hunter
Gordon D. Gee Seigfreid Bingham Levy Selzer
Hon. Samuel B. Graves U.S. House of Representatives
Robert K. Green HuschBlackwellSanders
Dr. John D. Hunkeler M.D.Hunkeler Eye Institute
Honorable John R. Hutcherson State of Missouri Sr. Judge
Howard T. Jacobson Paragon Capital Management
Mr. Howard Janzen Janzen Ventures, Inc.
Mr. Richard F. Jones Forrest T. Jones & Co
Ms. Alicia Kerber Mexican Consulate
Dr. William C. LaHue M.D.Physician
Larry G. Mallin Mallin Brothers Co.
Mr. Thomas A. McCullough DST Systems
George H. Meyers M.D.Retired
C. Jack Phillips Retired
Dr. David A. Rock Retired
Ralph W. Rowe JrRetired
Dwight L. Sampson Reitred
Mr. J. C. Smith B&L Electric
Mr. J. Philip Starr Retired
Mr. Arthur D. Stevens Retired
Mr. William Tempel Retired
Dr. Paul M. Thomson Truman Heartland Community Foundation
Mr. James C. Velghe Sr.Work Dynamics, Inc.
Tom Volek School of Jounalism, KU
Mr. John Walker
Dr. Gus S. Wetzel II, M.D.Wetzel Clinic
Mr. Del Wilkinson Retired
Larry Winn IIIPolsinlli, Shalton, & Welte
CEO Comments The Governance Chairman at the Executive Committee level oversees and monitors governance in all areas of council operations. A current code of conduct and ethics has been adopted by the Executive Committee for all Staff and Volunteers. In addition, we are in the process of updating our Strategic Plan for 2012-2017. This plan focuses on Membership, Program, Organization, Properties, Marketing, and Finance.  It will set our direction over the next five years and has involves participation by Scouters from all levels of volunteer involvement. The Council Nominating Committee has been meeting during the year to identify both new Executive Board prospects and potential Council officers. The Council chart of organization has been carefully analyzed and several changes/additions have been made to enhance volunteer involvement and operational effectiveness and are part of the Long Range Plan implementation. Positions added include a Vice President of Community Relationships and Scoutreach. We are one of 278 geographic council affiliated with the National Council, Boy Scouts of America serving families in all states as well as US Citizens and military families stationed worldwide. Both our National and local board members are elected yearly.
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01, 2017
Fiscal Year End Dec 31, 2017
Projected Revenue $11,007,814
Projected Expenses $10,988,379
Endowment Value $18,987,000
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage 7
Audit Documents
IRS Letter of Exemption
Foundation Comments
  • FY 2015, 2014, 2013: Financial data reported using local Boy Scout council's 990.
  • Foundation/corporate revenue line item may include contributions from individuals.
Detailed Financials
 
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$2,528,041$2,329,235$1,900,664
Government Contributions$0$0$0
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$0$0$0
Individual Contributions------
$670,452$714,100$727,788
$5,706,531$6,027,503$6,173,945
Investment Income, Net of Losses$24,551$337,515$193,804
Membership Dues$0$0$0
Special Events$664,726$566,694$584,393
Revenue In-Kind$24,370$16,982$14,295
Other$698,110$627,190$505,025
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$8,902,465$9,051,499$8,892,138
Administration Expense$294,314$290,853$283,897
Fundraising Expense$1,244,362$1,243,030$1,263,089
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.001.000.97
Program Expense/Total Expenses85%86%85%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue32%34%39%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$22,724,084$22,722,310$22,666,548
Current Assets$5,469,589$4,940,885$4,912,149
Long-Term Liabilities$92,241$64,530$73,321
Current Liabilities$1,880,386$1,850,043$1,491,504
Total Net Assets$20,751,457$20,807,737$21,101,723
Short-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities2.912.673.29
Long-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountUnited Way of Greater Kansas City $384,735 -- --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountCommerce Trust Company $223,645 -- --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountUnited Way of Greater Kansas City - Donor $204,994 -- --
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years Yes
Organization Comments

The Council operates on a sound fiscal basis. We have a large base of donors that we never take for granted and always work to expand. Most of the funds we raise through our annual giving program, Investment in Character, comes from families and Scouting alumni. 

Organization Name Boy Scouts of America, Heart of America Council
Address 10210 Holmes Road
Kansas City, MO 641314212
Primary Phone (816) 9429333
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Kendrick J.E. Miller
Board Chair Mr. Zachary Shafran
Board Chair Company Affiliation Waddell & Reed
Year of Incorporation 1910