Junior Achievement of Middle America, Inc.
4001 Blue Parkway, Suite 210
Kansas City MO 64130-3006
Web and Phone Contact
Telephone (816) 561-3558 12
Mission Statement
The mission of Junior Achievement is to inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy.  
 
Junior Achievement brings business back to the classroom by providing programs to promote financial literacy, inspire entrepreneurship, and prepare students (K-12) for success in a 21st century workplace. By connecting classrooms with business and community volunteers in a hands-on learning environment, we equip Kansas City's next generation wih the skills they need for a prosperous future. 
 
Junior Achievement's Core Values are:
  • Belief in the boundless potential of young people.
  • Commitment to the principles of market-based economics and entrepreneurship.
  • Passion for what we do and honesty, integrity, and excellence in how we do it.
  • Respect for the talents, creativity, perspectives, and backgrounds of all individuals.
  • Belief in the power of partnership and collaboration.
  • Conviction in the educational and motivational impact of relevant, hands-on learning.
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Megan Sturges
Board Chair Mr. Jeff Greig
Board Chair Company Affiliation Burns & McDonnell
History and Background
Year of Incorporation 1955
Financial Summary
Revenue Expense Area Graph

Comparing revenue to expenses shows how the organizations finances fluctuate over time.

Source: IRS Form 990

 Breakdown
Net Gain/Loss:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.
Statements
Mission Statement
The mission of Junior Achievement is to inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy.  
 
Junior Achievement brings business back to the classroom by providing programs to promote financial literacy, inspire entrepreneurship, and prepare students (K-12) for success in a 21st century workplace. By connecting classrooms with business and community volunteers in a hands-on learning environment, we equip Kansas City's next generation wih the skills they need for a prosperous future. 
 
Junior Achievement's Core Values are:
  • Belief in the boundless potential of young people.
  • Commitment to the principles of market-based economics and entrepreneurship.
  • Passion for what we do and honesty, integrity, and excellence in how we do it.
  • Respect for the talents, creativity, perspectives, and backgrounds of all individuals.
  • Belief in the power of partnership and collaboration.
  • Conviction in the educational and motivational impact of relevant, hands-on learning.
Background Statement

The Junior Achievement movement was founded nationally in 1919 when Theodore N. Vail, president of AT&T, moved forward with a vision to help youth understand fiscal management.  The Company Program was offered to high school students on an after-school basis.  Today, Junior Achievement is represented throughout the United States, reaching millions of youth annually, instilling practical concepts and experiences in financial literacy.

 

In 1955, Kenneth A. Spencer founded Junior Achievement in Kansas City, which began with the JA High School program involving 255 students and 40 volunteers. By the 1983-84 school year, the numbers had grown to 2,120 students and 423 volunteers along with an additional 1,119 students and 146 volunteers in its outlying operations. Throughout the years we have grown to serve nearly 18,000 students annually within the community.  
Impact Statement

The top accomplishments for Junior Achievement of Middle America (JAMA) during the 2015-2016 fiscal year included the following:

 
  1. JAMA reached and impacted 21,243 students in the greater Kansas City metropolitan area with nationally-developed curriculum, providing practical information and experiential learning opportunities that enabled the students to better understand financial literacy, plan for a successful career, and consider an entrepreneurial venture. JAMA increased student outreach by 18.1% from the 2014-2015 school year, exceeding our projected goal.
  2. Developed a grade level approach within the Kansas City Public School District, delivering JA Our Region programming to every fourth grade student in the district.  This initiative alone impacted 1,034 students in 46 classrooms. JA Our Region is an interdisciplinary program that introduces fourth grade students to entrepreneurship and upper elementary grade social studies learning objectives, including regions, resources, supply chains, and problem solving. The program provides students with a practical approach to starting a business while preparing them to be entrepreneurial in their thinking and to meet the requirements of a demanding and ever-changing workforce. 
  3. Created a marketing committee of the Board of Directors and partnered with Americorps to add a VISTA (Volunteers in Service to America) position to assist in building capacity and increasing awareness for the organization.  During the past year, JAMA has made great strides to build engagement with our community by establishing a consistent voice to tell the JA story. JAMA also developed mission-focused messaging across the organization as well as numerous branded collateral materials to aid in the organization's fundraising and volunteer recruitment efforts.
  4. Junior Achievement practiced strong fiduciary responsibility with large increases in contributed support from corporations and individuals, as well as special event giving.  While carefully managing expenses, JAMA lowered the cost per student from $37 in FY15 to $33.81 per student in FY16, as well as ending the fiscal year exceeding budgeted revenue goals.   
 
Organizational goals for the 2016-2017 fiscal year include:
 
  1. Expand K-5 outreach in Title I schools to achieve 24,500 total student outreach.  
  2. Expand job shadow programs at middle school level (grades 6-8)
  3. Implement JA Signature/Capstone Programs including online simulations and traditionally delivered programs.
  4. Establish new sources of revenue.
  5. Strengthen and build the Junior Achievement Board of Directors through diversification, experience, passion, and commitment to the mission. 
Needs Statement
At the present time, the most pressing needs for Junior Achievement include the following:
 
  1. Loaned Professional Expertise - in our ongoing effort to be as fiscally efficient as possible, we'd like to secure professional expertise from corporate partners on a pro-bono basis in certain areas, such as advertising or marketing. This would be on a project-basis, and would, ideally, help get us started, instilling ideas and infrastructure.
  2. Additional staff support for programs.  The growth of our organization is rapidly expanding.  The need for the programs we provide is great.  In order to keep up with the rate of our growth and the demand for our programs, additional staff is needed to support the program department's efforts to achieve our goal to reach 24,500 in fiscal year 2017 and 30,000 students by the end of our fiscal year in 2018.
  3. Volunteers to teach in the classroom.  Each year, more and more teachers are requesting Junior Achievement be taught in their classroom. Unfortunately, many requests cannot be fulfilled because there are not enough volunteers to teach.  Junior Achievement would like to have a large pool of individuals who we can go to when these opportunities come available. Junior Achievement is creating new & innovative approaches to meet the demands of day-time volunteer needs.  
Service Categories
Elementary & Secondary Schools
Youth Development-Business
Areas of Service
MO - Jackson County
MO - Clay County
MO - Platte County
KS - Wyandotte County
KS - Johnson County
MO - Jackson County Urban Core
KS - Wyandotte County Urban Core
MO - Caldwell
MO - Buchanan
MO - Cass County
KS - Atchison County
CEO/Executive Director/Board Chair Statement

At JA, we celebrate the future success of youth by providing them with knowledge about money—how to get money and how to keep money; skills to plan for an exciting career; the opportunity to consider a hot new business; and the motivation to make smart academic, economic, and leadership decisions.  And with all the financial chaos on the planet, there is no better time to support our young people than now!

 

As one of our former board members has stated, “There is no better time for JA than now, and there is no more important mission for a youth-serving nonprofit than JA.”  As we move from an industrial economy to the knowledge or innovation economy, it is imperative that our young people understand the value of money, are prepared to meet the demands of the new workforce, and have a unique opportunity to consider starting a new exciting business.  Kansas City’s future work force is in the classroom today.  The next generation of entrepreneurs, like the Helzbergs, Mr. Kauffman, or the Bloch brothers, are in the classroom today.  The future strength of the Kansas City region’s economy is dependent upon us preparing our young people for some of the greatest challenges any generation has ever seen. 

 

JA is not just another fad or great youth idea.  We see our mission as a call to action.  If we don’t get this mission done, our future as a region suffers and will lag behind other American and international regional economies. 

 

Our challenge to meet is great.  Like many nonprofits, we need resources to reach as many students as we can each year.  While our priority is to reach students in Title 1 classrooms (schools in which the majority of students qualify for free and reduced meals), we are very eager to reach students in all areas of the metro.  We believe that all students, no matter their families' socioeconomic status, must learn the value of money, especially as we approach a cashless society.  The financial resources required to reach as many students as possible are great and a challenge we work with daily. 

 

Our other challenge is welcoming and retaining volunteers to teach our nationally-recognized curriculum.  We need an army of adults to arm themselves with the great message.  Our work is for people who care deeply about how we educate the next generation and are willing to invest in those lives.  For more information on volunteering, please feel free to go to our website (www.jagkc.org) or visit us on social media at the following locations: @jakansascity, www.facebook.com/jakansascity, and hwww.linkedin.com/company/junior-achievement-of-greater-kansas-city

 

We know donors have many options to support well-deserved nonprofits in our region.  As a result, we greatly appreciate your interest in helping us prepare area young people with the skills and confidence they will need to be successful in a global innovative economy.  Thanks again for your interest and we look forward to our partnership with you.
Programs
Description Elementary School Programs include the following: 

Kindergarten – Ourselves
Uses compelling stories read aloud by the volunteer, along with hands-on activities, to demonstrate helping, working, earning, and saving.

1st Grade – Our Families
Emphasizes the roles people play in the local economy and engages students with activities about needs, wants, jobs, tools and skills, and interdependence.

2nd Grade – Our Community
Explores the interdependent roles of workers in a community, the work they perform, and how communities work.

3rd Grade – Our City
Studies careers, skills needed for specific careers, and how businesses contribute to a city.

4th Grade – Our Region
Introduces the relationship between natural, human, and capital resources found in different regions; explores regional businesses that produce goods and services for consumers.

5th Grade – Our Nation 
Provides practical information the need for individuals who can meet the demands of the job market, including high-growth, high-demand jobs. 

Category Education, General/Other Partnerships in Education
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years), ,
Short-Term Success Help students understand how business and economics affect their personal, family and community life. Prepared kits of sequential lesson guides, discussion points, activity materials, and follow-up opportunities are presented through a series of visits by volunteers from the corporate sector. Ourselves introduces the economic roles of individuals. Our Families discusses the role of families in the local economy. Our Community examines responsibilities and economic opportunities available within a community. Our City considers economic development, local businesses, and career opportunities. Our Region explains the economic/business resources found in state and regional economies. Our Nation introduces the concept of globalization of business as it relates to the various careers students may choose to pursue, and the need for students to be entrepreneurial in their thinking.
Long-Term Success The Elementary School Programs include sequential themes for kindergarten through fifth-grade students. Students learn the basic concepts of business and economics and how education is relevant to the workplace. The sequential activities build on studies from each preceding grade and prepare students for secondary school and lifelong learning.
Program Success Monitored By
For each classroom session, grades 3 - 5, students are provided a pre/post test evaluation to determine what skills they gained through the Junior Achievement curriculum.  In addition, all classroom volunteers are provided a post survey, as well as the classroom teacher.  Volunteers collect post tests and provide back to JAMA.  Teacher and volunteers surveys are collected by JAMA staff.
After the first class is presented, JA staff reach out to teachers and volunteers to make sure that the class is being taught, if it is meeting expectations and that all curriculum material is provided to the volunteer.  
 
In addition, the Education Committee of the Board provides oversight of growth and program progress and reports results to JA's Board of Directors six times a year. 
 
At the end of each school term, representatives from JA USA reach out to all schools in which JA was presented to ensure the class actually was taught.   
 
 
 
Examples of Program Success
In the 2015-2016 school year, Junior Achievement provided curriculum to 780 classrooms reaching 16,668 students, providing 83,440 student contact hours of learning and exposure to business concepts.
 
Summer programming included the delivery of JA More than Money, a partnership with the School of Economics in Blue Springs, Missouri and JA Our Nation STEM programs for the second consecutive year.
Description
Middle School Programs include the following:

JA Economics for Success – provides practical information about personal finance and the importance of identifying education and career goals based on a student’s skills, interest, and values.

JA Global Marketplace -Provides students with practical information about what makes international trade work and how it affects their daily lives.

JA It’s My Business! – emphasizes entrepreneurship while providing a strong focus on social studies, reading, and writing skills. Students are encouraged to use critical thinking to learn entrepreneurial skills that support positive attitudes as they explore and enhance their career aspirations.

JA It’s My Future. Introduces students to entrepreneurship concepts, explores potential careers and prepares their personal-branding maps to the future.

 
Category Education, General/Other Partnerships in Education
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years), ,
Short-Term Success

85% of the students who participated in Junior Achievement in middle school in the 2015-2016 school year indicated an increase knowledge and skill set of the concepts and skills stated.  

Long-Term Success
85% of the students who complete the curriculum in JA's middle school programs will achieve the following.  
 
Students are able to identify the following concepts: credit vs. debt, gross income, needs vs. wants, net income, brand, career mapping, career clusters, high growth jobs, soft skills, cultures, domestic trade, entrepreneurship, emigration vs. immigration, international trade,  
advertising, business plans, civic responsibility, marketing, profit and customer relations.
 
Students will obtain the following skills: critical thinking, decision making, following direction, interpreting data, math calculations, oral and written communications, problem solving, working in groups, brain storming, critical reading, gathering and organizing information, persuasion, compromise, bargaining, categorizing data, following written directions, setting goals, interviewing, oral and visual presentation, self-assessment, active listening, deductive reasoning, money management and measurement.   
 
 
Program Success Monitored By
For each classroom session, students are provided a pre/post test evaluation to determine what skills they gained through the Junior Achievement curriculum. In addition, all classroom volunteers are provided a post survey, as well as the classroom teacher. Volunteers collect post tests and provide back to JAMA. Teacher and volunteers surveys are collected by JAMA staff.
After the first class is presented, JA staff reach out to teachers and volunteers to make sure that the class is being taught, if it is meeting expectations and that all curriculum material is provided to the volunteer.
In addition, the Education Committee of the Board provides oversight of growth and program progress and reports results to JA's Board of Directors six times a year.
At the end of each school term, representatives from JA USA reach out to all schools in which JA was presented to ensure the class actually was taught.
Examples of Program Success

Junior Achievement was presented in 90 classrooms reaching 2,180 students providing 13,080 student contact hours.

Description
High School Programs include the following:
  1. JA Economics – an introduction to economics. Theoretical concepts are enriched by the experience of organizing and operating a student company.
  2. JA Company Program - this 15-lesson course helps young people appreciate and better understand the role of business in our society, by organizing and operating an actual business enterprise.
  3. JA TitanStudents are put into teams to work on manufacturing and marketing. All curriculum is completed on the Internet.
  4. JA Career Success – students learn skills necessary for the modern workplace, including interpersonal skills, teamwork, critical thinking, and problem solving strategies. Computer-generated skill assessment software is included.
  5. JA Be Entrepreneurial focuses on challenging students, through interactive classroom activities, to start their own entrepreneurial venture while still in high school.
  6. JA Personal Finance demonstrates the importance of planning, goal setting, and thoughtful decision-making within the context of personal financial decisions.
  7. JA Exploring Economics fosters lifelong skills and knowledge about how an economy works, including micro-, macro, personal, and international economics.
  8. JA Economics – Reinforces concepts of micro- and macro-economics by having students explore the basic characteristics of the U.S. economic system and how economic principles influence business decisions.
  9. JA Job Shadow introduces students to careers through one-day, on-site workplace orientations.

Category Education, General/Other Partnerships in Education
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years), ,
Short-Term Success In the 2015-2016 school year, 70% of the students were able to identify concepts and skills noted.  
Long-Term Success
For students completing JA programming in high school, 85% are able to identify the following:
  • Concepts -  business plan, ethics, marketing, collaboration, communication, conflict management, critical thinking, job retention skills, STEM,  supply and demand, global economy, scarcity, federal reserve system, risk vs. reward, saving, budgeting, credit, investing, business management, competition,  entrepreneurship, stocks, job hunting and interviewing, networking, resume skills.   
  • Skills -  analyzing information, categorizing data, decision making, oral and written communications, working in groups, collaborations, following written and oral instructions, critical thinking, goal setting, time management, leadership, public speaking, research, graphing, negotiating, solving mathematical equations, product assembly, estimation, selling, creativity and innovation, interview skills, self-assessment.  
Program Success Monitored By
For each classroom session, students are provided a pre/post test evaluation to determine what skills they gained through the Junior Achievement curriculum. In addition, all classroom volunteers are provided a post survey, as well as the classroom teacher. Volunteers collect post tests and provide back to JAMA. Teacher and volunteers surveys are collected by JAMA staff.
After the first class is presented, JA staff reach out to teachers and volunteers to make sure that the class is being taught, if it is meeting expectations and that all curriculum material is provided to the volunteer.
In addition, the Education Committee of the Board provides oversight of growth and program progress and reports results to JA's Board of Directors six times a year.
At the end of each school term, representatives from JA USA reach out to all schools in which JA was presented to ensure the class actually was taught.
Examples of Program Success
Junior Achievement presented curriculum in 107 classrooms reaching 2,375 students, providing 16,380 student contact hours.
 
CEO Comments

At Junior Achievement, we continuously monitor education trends to ensure that our programs complement and reinforce classroom learning and align with future workforce needs and state education learning standards. It is increasingly evident that in order for the United States to compete and succeed in the global marketplace, there exists an urgency to prepare students for innovative and 21st century careers - such as science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) as well as entrepreneurial ventures.

We actively seek to engage volunteers who are currently working in 21st century careers to facilitate JA programs and share their personal work experiences, providing students with real-world examples. JA has incorporated STEM career-related concepts into several of our existing programs, and we are committed to incorporating relevant STEM and entrepreneurial elements into new programs we develop.

We know the traditional classroom model doesn’t work for every student—but there are programs we can implement during classroom time to link learning to the real world—and strengthen our future workforce and create jobs in the process. At Junior Achievement, we give young people from kindergarten through the 12thgrade the knowledge and skills they need to plan for their future and make smart academic and economic choices. JA programs complement the hard work and dedication that teachers are putting into educating their students.

JA helps students envision the possibilities of what they can be by helping them see the value of staying in school. Our interactive curriculum engages and excites students, leading to stronger critical thinking and decision-making skills and more confidence. JA programs are delivered by trained corporate and community volunteers who share their skills and personal and professional experiences to make learning come to life.

Junior Achievement of Middle America has been educating K-12 students about entrepreneurship, work readiness, and financial literacy since 1955. Throughout the years we have grown and in school year 2015-16 we will engage over 18,000 students in Junior Achievement of Middle America programs. For more information about JA and how to get Junior Achievement in your classroom, check out our website at www.jagkc.org. 

Executive Director/CEO
Executive Director Ms. Megan Sturges
Term Start Aug 2014
Experience

Megan Sturges is an experienced professional who brings many years of leadership in non-profit business development, fundraising, marketing, and communications.  She most recently served as Executive Director at Reach Out and Read Kansas City and prior to that was with the Phoenix Family.  She completed her Master’s degree in Family Studies and Human Services at Kansas State University and recently joined an elite group of leaders upon graduating from the Ladder to Leadership Fellowship sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Healthcare Foundation of Greater Kansas City, and the Center for Creative Leadership in Greensboro, NC.  

Co-CEO/Executive Director
Term Start
Compensation Last Year
Former CEOs
NameTerm
Dr. Bernard Franklin Ph.DJan 2012 - Feb
Ms. Jan Murfield Jan 2010 - Oct 2012
Senior Staff
Title Senior Program Director
Staff
Paid Full-Time Staff 6
Paid Part-Time Staff 2
Volunteers 879
Paid Contractors 0
Retention Rate 60%
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Plans & Policies
Organization Has a Fundraising Plan Yes
Organization Has a Strategic Plan Yes
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Organization Policy and Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistleblower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Collaborations
Junior Achievement of Middle America has established collaborative partnerships with the following school districts in Kansas and Missouri for the purpose of delivering JA programs directly to students in the classroom during the school day:  Center, Hickman Mills, Kansas City (KS), Kansas City (MO), North Kansas City, Olathe, Shawnee Mission, St. Joseph.
 
In addition, Junior Achievement partners with several other non-profit agencies to deliver programming at their sites.  These agencies include the Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Kansas City, LINC, Youth Entrepreneurs, Big Brothers Big Sisters, Greenworks, Boys & Girls Choirs, Camp Enterprise, and School of Economics.
 
From an administrative perspective contracts with Support KC for financial services and payroll management. 
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Junior Achievement Worldwide1955
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Summit Bronze Award for Outstanding Program Impact & Quality, Financial Solvency, and Management EffectivenessJunior Achievement USA2012
Star Award - 5 Star Level (Highest Level of Distinction)Junior Achievement USA2015
Government Licenses
Is your organization licensed by the government? No
CEO Comments

In 2014, Junior Achievement of Middle America hired a new Executive Director, Megan Sturges.  Ms. Sturges brings a wealth of experience and education to the leadership position at JAMA.  With her leadership team, they are in the process of process of analyzing all policies, procedures, and systems in place for the management of the organization.  A comprehensive re-thinking of procedures is happening to insure that the agency is as efficient as possible with personnel, volunteers, and resources.

 
In addition, board recruitment has become a priority and as a result new community leaders have joined the organization, bringing with them additional volunteer and funding opportunities.  
 
In the past few years, JAMA has experienced a lot of leadership transition on the staff.  The board believes that the Organization is now set with individuals who bring to the table a wealth of skills, a vast network and a desire to grow the mission to higher levels, reaching more schools and ultimately more youth.  
Board Chair
Board Chair Mr. Jeff Greig
Company Affiliation Burns & McDonnell
Term July 2015 to June 2017
Email jgreig@burnsmcd.com
Board Members
NameAffiliation
Mrs. Marjorie Adair iModules
Mr. Bryce Anderson Bank of Blue Valley
Mr. David Anderson Ernst & Young, LLP
Mr. Jeff Anderson Grant Thornton
Mr. Alec Blackwell Cushman Wakefield
Mr. Christopher Blackwood Ericsson, Inc.
Mr. Stephen Bledsoe Berkowitz Oliver LLP
Mr. Brian Brogan American Century Investments
Mr. Brian M. Burns Blue Cross Blue Shield of Kansas City
Ms. Barbara Christ Arvest Bank
Mr. Matthew G. Clark U.S. Bank
Mr. Stephen J. Cosentino Stinson Morrison Hecker LLP
Mr. Tim Dunn JE Dunn Construction Group
Mr. Mark Eagleton Citizens Bank & Trust
Ms. Jennifer Emerson CitiCards
Mr. Scott Ferguson Morgan Stanley
Ms. Gena Fitzgerald Hallmark
Mr. Jeffrey Greig Burns & McDonnell
Mrs. Amy Grothaus Community America Credit Union
Ms. Angela Hoffman Black & Veatch
Mr. Joseph G. Jacobs Kansas City Power & Light Co.
Ms. Tammy Kapeller SCOR
Mrs. Ailie Kofoid EML
Ms. Mandy Kruger JE Dunn Construction
Dr. Anthony Lewis Kansas City Public Schools
Mr. Kesavanand Maganti Accenture
Mr. John C. Martin Jr.PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
Mr. KC Mathews UMB Bank, n.a
Mr. Leroy McCarty Forrest T. Jones & Company
Ms. Melea McRae Crux Marketing
Mr. Michael R. Mollerus KPMG, LLP
Mrs. Kathryn Rhodes CBIZ MHM, LLC
Ms. Lisa Ridge Nodoway Bank
Mr. Raffaele Sadun The Mutual Fund Store
Ms. Julie Schaller Freightquote
Mrs. Laura Scobie H&R Block
Mr. Joe Scovell DST
Mr. Peter Shriver Cross First Bank
Mr. Chris Sims Capitol Federal Bank
Mr. Ramon Smith State Farm Insurance
Mrs. Laura Stack Fox Point Trucking
Ms. Kelly Uran Bank of the West
Ms. Jodi Vickery Pioneer Financial Services
Mrs. Shawna F. Wright Commerce Bank
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 42
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 26
Female 18
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 70%
Written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 22%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 6
Standing Committees
Audit
Board Governance
Education
Executive
Marketing
Finance
Investment
CEO Comments

Junior Achievement of Middle America has a strong Board of Directors, and organized structure of Board committees, and a good system of checks and balances.  In recent years, we have experienced a 25% increase in demand for financial literacy education from area schools and community centers. In response, our Board has provided oversight through the growth to make sure our agency has developed a strong fundraising plan to match the demand for services.

 

In order to meet the increased demand, we are increasing operational efficiencies, expanding the revenue streams and diversifying donor choices. Our Board members have committed to personal efforts in development calls and more members of the board have become more engaged in our efforts in a variety of ways.

 

The Board has also provided oversight on program quality.  Quality control measurements have been implemented for teacher evaluations and volunteer evaluations. The Board recognizes the lifeline that volunteers bring to Junior Achievement.  Without volunteers, there is no JA programming.  With growth in both numbers of volunteers and their expanded involvement, the agency has tremendous capacity for growth.

Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01, 2016
Fiscal Year End June 30, 2017
Projected Revenue $771,845
Projected Expenses $715,963
IRS Letter of Exemption
Foundation Comments
  • FYE 6/30/2015, 2014: Financial data reported using the IRS Form 990.
  • FYE 6/30/2013: Financial data reported using the organization's audited financial statements. 
  • Foundations/corporate revenue line item may include contributions from individuals.
Detailed Financials
 
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$290,433$301,114$324,926
Government Contributions$0$0$0
Federal----$0
State----$0
Local----$0
Unspecified$0$0$0
Individual Contributions----$14,879
$24,978$15,834$0
$0$2,521$16,168
Investment Income, Net of Losses$508$531$631
Membership Dues$0$0$0
Special Events$310,437$305,807$313,052
Revenue In-Kind$53,115$3,434$14,519
Other$2,393$0$50,449
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$445,826$422,675$592,041
Administration Expense$78,489$216,031$60,725
Fundraising Expense$138,354$134,490$122,378
Payments to Affiliates----$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.030.810.95
Program Expense/Total Expenses67%55%76%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue22%22%19%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$893,379$885,850$1,022,550
Current Assets$890,521$885,245$964,748
Long-Term Liabilities$250$0$0
Current Liabilities$32,256$44,171$36,917
Total Net Assets$860,873$841,679$985,633
Short-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities27.6120.0426.13
Long-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years Yes
Organization Comments

During FY16, Junior Achievement experienced tremendous success and not only grew the student impact and outreach but reduced our cost per student from $37/student to $33.81/student. We finished the fiscal year with a surplus that is allowing us to continue to expand our program.  We are very thankful to the many corporate, private, individuals, and in-kind supporters who believe in our mission and are helping us serve the youth of Kansas City.

Organization Name Junior Achievement of Middle America, Inc.
Address 4001 Blue Parkway, Suite 210
Kansas City, MO 641303006
Primary Phone (816) 561-355812
Contact Email info@jagkc.org
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Megan Sturges
Board Chair Mr. Jeff Greig
Board Chair Company Affiliation Burns & McDonnell
Year of Incorporation 1955