Harvesters Community Food Network
3801 Topping Avenue
Kansas City MO 64129-1744
Web and Phone Contact
Telephone (816) 929-3000
Fax 816- 929-3123
Mission Statement
Our Mission
Harvesters—The Community Food Network has been our region’s solution to hunger for 40 years, serving as the community’s link between an abundant food supply and people in need. Our mission is to feed hungry people today and work to end hunger tomorrow.
 
Our Work
As the region’s only food bank, Harvesters’ expertise in distributing food and household products through our network of more than 760 nonprofit agencies is essential to communities across northwestern Missouri and northeastern Kansas. In partnership with our network of emergency food pantries, community kitchens, shelters, day care and senior centers, we offer more than 1,200 programs for food-insecure children, families, and seniors across 26 counties.

Our Vision
Harvesters envisions a time when everyone in our community will have access to enough nutritious food to maintain a healthy lifestyle. We work toward long-term solutions, building a stronger, healthier community through food access, nutrition services, hunger awareness, and advocacy.
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Valerie Nicholson-Watson
Board Chair Mr. Dan Crumb
Board Chair Company Affiliation Kansas City Chiefs
History and Background
Year of Incorporation 1979
Volunteer Opportunities
Ways to donate, support, or volunteer
Give food. There are many ways families, organizations, faith groups, and companies can make a difference by donating food to Harvesters, such as Food Drives, Give Lunch, and more. Learn more: www.harvesters.org/give-food; 816.929.3055; fooddrive@harvesters.org
 
Give money. Each $1 helps Harvesters provide 3 meals. Donate online at https://my.harvesters.org. To make a tribute gift or ask about your online gift, contact donations@harvesters.org or 816.929.3010.
  
Give time. Volunteers help sort food and perform other tasks at Harvesters' Topeka and Kansas City facilities. To schedule a volunteer opportunity, contact Volunteer Services at 816.929.3090 or volunteer@harvesters.org.
 
Give voice. YOU have the power to help end hunger! Become an advocate. Follow Harvesters on social media and sign up for advocacy email alerts. Visit www.harvesters.org/give-voice. 
Financial Summary
Revenue Expense Area Graph

Comparing revenue to expenses shows how the organizations finances fluctuate over time.

Source: IRS Form 990

 Breakdown
Net Gain/Loss:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.
Statements
Mission Statement
Our Mission
Harvesters—The Community Food Network has been our region’s solution to hunger for 40 years, serving as the community’s link between an abundant food supply and people in need. Our mission is to feed hungry people today and work to end hunger tomorrow.
 
Our Work
As the region’s only food bank, Harvesters’ expertise in distributing food and household products through our network of more than 760 nonprofit agencies is essential to communities across northwestern Missouri and northeastern Kansas. In partnership with our network of emergency food pantries, community kitchens, shelters, day care and senior centers, we offer more than 1,200 programs for food-insecure children, families, and seniors across 26 counties.

Our Vision
Harvesters envisions a time when everyone in our community will have access to enough nutritious food to maintain a healthy lifestyle. We work toward long-term solutions, building a stronger, healthier community through food access, nutrition services, hunger awareness, and advocacy.
Background Statement
For 40 years, Harvesters—The Community Food Network has been our region’s solution to hunger. By providing nutritious food, Harvesters meets a basic need while emphasizing health and serving people with dignity. Across our region, one in seven people get help from Harvesters’ network of nonprofit agencies.
 
Agency and community leaders from faith-based, nonprofit, and business organizations created Harvesters in 1979. Their collaboration responded to requests of growers and distributors who wanted the efficiency of a centralized contact and location for donating food instead of seeing it go to waste. Agencies were motivated to increase the quantity and variety of food they would be able to provide for people who might otherwise go hungry.
 
These needs brought together agencies with diverse backgrounds and purposes for a common objective, making it Harvesters’ mission to feed hungry people today and work to end hunger tomorrow. Harvesters does this by distributing food and household products through a network of more than 420 schools and 760 nonprofit agencies that provide more than 1,200 programs across our 26-county service area of northwestern Missouri and northeastern Kansas. Our agencies include food pantries, community kitchens, shelters, daycares, and senior centers. Together, we feed the most vulnerable members of our community.
 
Harvesters’ programs and collaborative relationships are focused on long-term solutions, leadership, and outreach that gets more food into the community, ensures balanced nutrition, empowers low-income clients with knowledge and resources to make healthy choices, and educates the public on the issue of hunger and its connection to healthy outcomes for individuals, communities, and society. Each year Harvesters provides food to more than 388,600 people.
 
As the only food bank serving our region, Harvesters is uniquely situated to the task of providing resources to the underserved. Harvesters has capacity to safely handle, store, and transport large quantities of food to our agency network. As a certified member of Feeding America, the nation's network of 200 food banks, Harvesters has access to donations from national food manufacturers.
 
Harvesters also has capacity to accept large quantities of USDA commodities.
 
Harvesters focuses on our expertise in acquiring and distributing food so our network partners can do what they do best—provide direct client services and distribute food to hungry people in their local communities.
Impact Statement

Harvesters’ top accomplishments in FY18 (July 1, 2017 – June 30, 2018) included:

  • Distributing a record-breaking 52.5 million pounds food, putting more than 47 million meals into the community.
  • Emphasized distribution of healthy food, including more than 17 million pounds of carrots, broccoli, apples, cabbage, oranges, zucchini, grapes and other fresh produce.
  • Filled the weekend meal gap for food-insecure students by sending home a backpack of nutritious meals with more than 18,400 children a week through the BackSnack program.
 
In FY19 (July 1, 2018 – June 30, 2019) Harvesters will:
  • Distribute 53 million pounds of food and related household items to people who might otherwise go hungry.
  • Serve more than 18,000 BackSnack students and expand our School Pantry program to meet needs of more students.
  • Deliver more than 7,000 Commodity Supplemental Food Program boxes of staple foods to low-income seniors.
Needs Statement

Ending hunger is challenging, but achievable. Together with the community, Harvesters moves toward this goal by getting good food to people who need it most, with help from people like you who give time, money, food, and voice to this cause.

Give time:  We couldn't feed 141,500 people every month without thousands of volunteers. Sort and pack food at Kansas City or Topeka warehouses and more.
 
Give money:  Harvesters must raise $18,924,000 in FY19 to fund programs and services.
  • Feeding Children (BackSnack, Kids Cafe after-school and summer meals, School Pantry)
  • Feeding Seniors (Senior Mobile Pantries, boxed commodity food deliveries)
  • Feeding Families (Food Pantries, Mobiles, Shelters, Kitchens, SNAP Outreach)
  • Healthy Eating & Education (proven curricula, pantry coaching and resources, advocacy)
Give food:  Harvesters counts on food donations valued at more than $83.7 million from individuals, producers, and growers to help feed hungry people. You can host a food drive, donate at a Harvesters Barrel in your grocery store, and more. 
 
Give voice:  Become an advocate. Learn more about these opportunities at www.harvesters.org.
Service Categories
Food Banks, Food Pantries
Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash)
Nutrition
Areas of Service
MO
KS
KS - Franklin County
KS - Johnson County
KS - Lawrence
KS - Wyandotte County
KS - Wyandotte County Urban Core
MO - Clay County
MO - Eastern Jackson Co
MO - Jackson County
MO - Jackson County Urban Core
MO - Liberty
MO - Platte County
MO - Ray County
MO - Cass County
MO - Eastern Jackson Co
MO - Lafayette
Geographic Area Served Narrative Harvesters is the food bank for 10 counties of northwestern Missouri and 16 counties of northeastern Kansas.
CEO/Executive Director/Board Chair Statement
The United States Census Bureau heralded good news in September 2016 when it announced the country’s poverty rate was down and median income rose 5.2% in 2015 to $56,516 - up from $53,718 in 2014. Along with the increased median income came news that the country’s poverty rate fell to 13.5%, representing a 1.2% drop. While this is good news for most, especially individuals and families negatively affected during the 2008 economic recession, median income is still below what it was in 2007, and 45 million Americans still live in poverty.
 
Poverty is a leading indicator of food insecurity, which is having enough food today but not knowing if there will be food tomorrow or enough food for everyone in the household. In Harvesters–The Community Food Network’s 26-county service area of northeastern Kansas and northwestern Missouri one in seven people are food insecure. That equates to 353,380 people who may not have enough food to live a healthy, active lifestyle.
 
Young children experience food insecurity more profoundly. Under the age of 18, one in five are at risk of hunger. That is 17.5% or 108,240 children in our region who may not know where their next meal will come from. Despite some improvement in the economy, the need for food assistance remains high. Understanding the following issues clarifies why the food assistance provided by Harvesters' network is so important:
  • rising rent (Kansas City experienced an 8.5% year-over-year increase) and utility costs put additional pressure on overtaxed financial resources
  • food deserts (low-income areas that lack access to grocery stores) exist in almost all 26 counties we serve
  • good nutrition is linked to good health
  • children and adults with appropriate food intake do better at school and work 
  • seniors who have access to good nutritious meals are able to live independently longer, food assistance provided by Harvesters and its partnering member agencies is as important as it has ever been.
As we move forward, Harvesters will Feed people in need, safely providing the healthiest food available; Partner with new and existing organizations to provide services that help stabilize families' health and finances; Advocate for programs and legislation that recognize and help meet the needs of food-insecure people; Operate in a spirit of excellence, guided by our mission and 2018-2020 Strategic Plan, working toward the day when everyone in our community will have access to enough nutritious food to maintain a healthy lifestyle.
Programs
Description One in four Harvesters’ emergency food recipients is a child. We serve children across our region by distributing food through member agency pantries, kitchens, and shelters, as well as programs like BackSnack, Kids Cafe, and Kids in the Kitchen.
Program Budget $8,162,437.00
Category Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food Distribution
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years), K-12 (5-19 years), Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program is linked to organization's mssion Yes
Program Frequently Assessed Yes
Short-Term Success Children are fully equipped and nourished, and able to pay attention and learn in school. There are fewer instances of behavior, attendance, or health problems because availability of food is not an issue. Children are given the tools to develop and reach their maximum potential. These tools include nutrition education and consistent, nutritious meals.
Long-Term Success Children need to have access to healthy and sufficient food in order to learn and grow and reach their full potential. They can then grow up to be self-sufficient adults who contribute to society and make a difference in the world.
Program Success Monitored By
Harvesters works with schools and our network of member agencies to offer Feeding Children programs. Each site has a coordinator who makes weekly or monthly reports and stays in contact with Harvesters staff.
 
Every 3 years, Harvesters conducts an independent evaluation of BackSnack, our flagship Feeding Children program. These evaluations consistently show the program meets its objectives. The 2015-2016 study gathered quantitative and qualitative data from school personnel surveys, student surveys, parent focus groups, and parent surveys. A few findings:
  1. The vast majority of students consume the food in the backpacks, and then share the rest of the food with their family.
  2. School-reported discipline referrals and tardies showed a statistically significant drop between beginning and middle of the year.
  3. Participating students made statistically significant gains in their grades.
Examples of Program Success

We have the nation's largest BackSnack program and are a regional leader for Kids Cafe. 

Major Feeding Children accomplishments in FY18 include:
  • Harvesters served more than 18,470 BackSnack students so they wouldn't miss meals over the weekend.
  • Kids Cafe served 352,037 after-school and summer meals. 
  • Provided 11,944,138 meals to children through all programs. 
Description

BackSnack combats the negative effects hunger has on children by providing a backpack filled with nutritious food for hungry children to take home on the last day of school each week to fill the meal gap when free or reduced-price school meals aren’t available. 

Piloted in 2004, BackSnack has grown from serving 30 students at one school to over 18,000 children, becoming a flagship program for Harvesters. Food-insecure children in our service area receive backpacks full of food for weekends at more than twice the national rate. This is due to early and ongoing generous support of the program, which allowed us to pilot and implement a delivery model that efficiently uses production schedules, volunteer support, and purchased food.

BackSnack's success was confirmed by data from a comprehensive, independent evaluation of BackSnack by Dr. Becky Eason, WordCraft, LLC. The evaluation showed statistically significant improvements in attentiveness, timeliness, and grades.

Program Budget $3,917,282.00
Category Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food Distribution
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years), Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program is linked to organization's mssion Yes
Program Frequently Assessed Yes
Short-Term Success

Children are fed consistently even when school meals aren't available so they return to school on Monday ready to learn. Because they are nourished and have regular access to healthy food, the children can pay better attention in school and are better equipped to learn. Academic achievement, attendance, and behavior improve because availability of food is not an issue.

Long-Term Success Children learn and grow uninhibited by circumstances beyond their control. They grow up to become successful members of society who live to their fullest potential.
Program Success Monitored By Harvesters measures this program's success based on the number of children served, number of backpacks distributed, and pounds of food distributed. Harvesters also works with an external evaluator to measure the program's impact on school achievement, attendance, and other academic factors.
Examples of Program Success

In FY18, Harvesters served 18,470 students through the BackSnack program. Also in FY18, Harvesters initiated an expansion of our School Pantry program in three BackSnack partner schools. that's now being offered to schools along with BackSnack for a blended program. BackSnack is essential for serving children who would go home to a weekend of no food, or where there's no one to prepare anything for them to eat. The School Pantry arm of the blended program more efficiently feeds children and their families who need help getting enough food to feed everyone in their household. 

Description

As the senior population grows, the need for Harvesters’ programs to address their specific needs is more critical than ever. Harvesters reaches as many as 77,720 seniors each year through its network of food pantries, senior centers, and on-site feeding programs.

Program Budget $3,438,092.00
Category Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food Distribution
Population Served Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens, Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program is linked to organization's mssion Yes
Program Frequently Assessed Yes
Short-Term Success Seniors no longer have to compromise their health or living situation on a regular basis by making difficult choices between paying for food or paying for rent, utilities or medicine/medical care. Lack of transportation, lack of mobility, or any other barriers do not prevent senior citizens from accessing nutritious food and other resources they need to live a quality life.
Long-Term Success Seniors across our region have access to adequate amounts of nutritious food to maintain their health, remain independent as long as possible, and have high quality of life. They receive what they need to continue to be self-sufficient, engaged citizens.
Program Success Monitored By Harvesters monitors our Senior Feeding Initiative by measuring total pounds distributed (20% of which goes to seniors) as well as the number of CSFP senior food boxes distributed per month. Harvesters also measures the pounds distributed through the Senior Mobile Food Pantry program and the number of sites we reach. Harvesters collects feedback from the mobile food pantry sites to provide the best service and learn about program successes or challenges.
Examples of Program Success
In FY18, Harvesters provided 9,555,311 meals for seniors across our 26-county service area. Harvesters Senior Mobile Pantries distributed 867,954 pounds of fresh produce and other perishable goods to 55 senior residential sites each month. For many this supplements their Commodity Supplemental Food Program monthly food boxes that include a USDA menu of shelf-stable food items. Harvesters delivered more than 6,000 CSFP food boxes (about 25 pounds each) each month to low-income seniors.
Description We know empty calories are not a viable solution for empty bellies. The opposite of hungry is not full—it’s healthy! Since our founding in 1979, getting food to where it is needed most has been our driving purpose. As Harvesters has grown, our definition of “good food” has evolved to emphasize nutrition, disease prevention, and basic food security as a right for all people. We are part of a growing community health movement, and believe every person in our nation should have access to the nutritious food they need to be healthy.
Program Budget $1,629,294.00
Category Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Nutrition
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program is linked to organization's mssion Yes
Program Frequently Assessed Yes
Short-Term Success
Participants demonstrate increased nutrition knowledge and behavior changes to implement a healthier lifestyle. Adequate amounts of nutritious foods are collected and distributed through Food Drives, Food Rescue, and Fresh Produce programs to ensure access to nutritious foods. 
 
Advocacy from grassroots to treetops builds knowledge and understanding of hunger for community members and influences policies that contribute to ending food insecurity. 
Long-Term Success People with low incomes become equipped with the skills and knowledge to provide healthy meals for themselves and their families on a limited budget. This contributes to the overall health and well-being of their family and the children and/or seniors in their care.
Program Success Monitored By Healthy Eating Initiative program progress is measured by the number of nutrition education sessions, participant pre- and post-tests, participant feedback, knowledge increase, and behavior change. Harvesters also measures the acquisition and distribution of targeted, nutritious foods by food category.
Examples of Program Success

In FY18:

  • Harvesters distributed over 17 million pounds of produce across our 26-county service area
  • Completed 20 Healthy Pantry Partnerships with partner agencies across our network to implement program changes, encourage healthy choices, grow capacity, and increase impact on people served. 
Additionally, starting in FY18 Harvesters committed to increased collaboration with community health leaders to advocate for our clients health and well-being. FY18 key partnership successes include:
  •  Research College of Nursing students deployed to 11 agencies, making 25 visits during which health screenings were provided for 300-400 pantry clients. This program is now integrated with the school's curriculum and will continue into the future.
  • Expanding to serve Kids Cafe summer meals at 3 Children's Mercy clinics
  • Working with American Diabetes Association and American Heart Association to provide resources for agencies and implement trainings. 
Description

Most emergency food recipients are reached through Harvesters’ extensive network of agencies as part of the Feeding Families Initiative. Through Harvesters’ online ordering system, all of our member pantries, shelters, kitchens, daycares, and senior centers have access to a variety of food and household items, from wherever they are located across our 26-county service area. As a result, our agencies are assured access to the nutritious foods their clients want and need.

Program Budget $5,694,176.00
Category Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food Distribution
Population Served Families, Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent, At-Risk Populations
Program is linked to organization's mssion Yes
Program Frequently Assessed Yes
Short-Term Success Individuals who are in need of food assistance are provided with the food they need to lead a healthy lifestyle. Individuals do not have to make difficult choices between paying for food and other necessities.
Long-Term Success Families, adults and children have adequate access to the food they need to lead a healthy lifestyle. Individuals and families are self-sufficient and able to increase their quality of life.
Program Success Monitored By Harvesters monitors success of our Feeding Families Initiative by measuring total pounds of food distributed. Harvesters uses United States Census Bureau information to calculate the number of meals Harvesters distributes per person in need in our service area. This calculation helps determine the effectiveness of our service by person in need and equitable service across our region. 
Examples of Program Success

In FY18:

  • Harvesters provided 26,277,105 meals to families
  • Operated 230 mobile food pantries to 186 agencies, distributing 17,550,917 pounds of food across all 26 counties in our service area.
  • Exceeded Feeding America's target by providing 45.3 meals per person in need in all 26 counties Harvesters' serves. 
  • Expanded SNAP Outreach into 5 correctional facilities and re-entry centers.
  • Added 43 new partner agencies in areas of immediate need, high capacity, or serving at-risk populations.
CEO Comments

Harvesters’ four initiatives - Feeding Children, Feeding Families, Feeding Seniors and Healthy Eating - encompass all of the ways in which Harvesters fulfills our mission. As many as 388,600 individuals each year receive food through Harvesters’ network of agencies. Harvesters is truly the community's response to hunger. Because of community support, Harvesters is able to meet the basic need for food.

Executive Director/CEO
Executive Director Ms. Valerie Nicholson-Watson
Term Start July 2013
Experience Valerie Nicholson-Watson joined Harvesters on July 1, 2013, as President and CEO. Nicholson-Watson was formerly president and CEO of the Niles Home for Children in Kansas City, Missouri, and has been a member of Harvesters' board of directors since 2007. Nicholson-Watson has been a leader in the local nonprofit community since 1999. Prior to her position at the Niles Home, she was Harvesters' director of community services. Nicholson-Watson has a Bachelor of Journalism degree from the University of Missouri-Columbia and a MBA from Webster University.
Former CEOs
NameTerm
Karen HarenNov 1999 - June 2013
Ms. Judy PerryNov 1985 - Oct 1999
Senior Staff
Title Chief Resource Officer
Experience/Biography
Joanna Sebelien is Harvesters' Chief Resource Officer She is responsible for the resource areas of fundraising, volunteer, nutrition education, food acquisition, media relations and public  policy programs and activities for the past 11 years. Prior to Harvesters, she served 16 years as assistant vice chancellor of university advancement and executive director of the alumni association at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. Previously she was regional director and national director of development for Camp Fire, Inc. Sebelien is a member of Rotary 13, The Greater Kansas City Council on Philanthropy, the Mid-America Planned Giving Council, and an alumni member of the Centurians of the KC Chamber of Commerce.
 
Sebelien graduated with honors from Boston College and holds a masters degree from Central Michigan University. 
Title Chief Operations Officer
Experience/Biography Steve Davis joined Harvesters in June of 2015. He previously worked nearly 11 years with the Blue Valley School District in Overland Park, Kansas. Steve was the Director of Budget and Business Operations where he had leadership responsibility for eight departments. Mr. Davis earned his MBA at Mid-America Nazarene University and a Bachelor's degree in Food Science and Human Nutrition from Washington State University.
Staff
Paid Full-Time Staff 130
Paid Contractors 0
Volunteers 76153
Retention Rate 81%
Staff Diversity (Ethnicity)
African American/Black 25
Asian American/Pacific Islander 2
Caucasian 93
Hispanic/Latino 5
Native American/American Indian 2
Other 3
Staff Diversity (Gender)
Female 59
Male 73
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Plans & Policies
Organization Has a Fundraising Plan Yes
Organization Has a Strategic Plan Yes
Management Succession Plan Yes
Organization Policy and Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistleblower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Collaborations

Harvesters collaborates with our network of more than 760 nonprofit agencies across 26 counties to feed hungry people. Harvesters would not be able to distribute food without the dedication and commitment of our agencies that serve on the front lines in our region’s fight against hunger. Harvesters provides food, training, and resources on safe food handling, nutrition, strategic planning, volunteers, and fundraising.

Harvesters collaborates with providers to ensure clients can find other types of assistance, such as MAACLink and United Way 211. As part of the community health care movement, we collaborate with organizations to provide resources for agencies, such as the American Diabetes and American Heart associations.

As a certified member of Feeding America (the national network of food banks), Food Research Action Center, the Missouri Association of Food Banks, and Greater Kansas City Food Policy Coalition, Harvesters shares and accesses best practices, research, and food resources.

Harvesters also participates in federal food programs to serve clients: Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (formerly Food Stamps), school meal programs, The Emergency Food Assistance Program, and the Commodity Supplemental Food Program.

Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Feeding America - Affiliate1979
United Way Member Agency2000
AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals)2000
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
9th consecutive 4-star ratingCharity Navigator2018
5th consecutive Advocacy Hall of Fame ClassFeeding America0
Excellence in Fundraising (Team)Association of Fundraising Professionals2017
Food Bank of the YearFeeding America2011
Government Licenses
Is your organization licensed by the government? No
CEO Comments

Harvesters’ management has experienced continuity of leadership with only five executive directors in our 39-year history. This provides stable and consistent leadership and is a factor in our efficiency and success as an organization.

Board Chair
Board Chair Mr. Dan Crumb
Company Affiliation Kansas City Chiefs
Term July 2011 to June 2020
Board Members
NameAffiliation
Ms. Jamie Allen
Mr. Dan Crumb, board chair
Ms. Wynne Dillon
Mr. Wesley FieldsBryan Cave LLP
Mr. David Gates
Mr. John George, past chairHallmark Cards, Inc.
Ms. Nancy Lewis, secretary
Mr. Andrew Lindeman
Ms. Jill MeriweatherGallagher Benefit Services, Inc.
Ms. Julie SalmonJRS Consulting LLC
Mr. Keith SliferBank of America Merrill Lynch
Mr. Kevin StrathmanDairy Farmers of America
Ms. Kimberly SvatyGencur Svaty Public Affairs
Mr. S. Brent Varzaly, treasurerBOK Financial
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 11
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 8
Female 6
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 78%
Written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 6
Standing Committees
Audit
Board Development / Board Orientation
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Executive
Finance
Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction
Advisory Board Members
NameAffiliation
Ms. Andrea Allison-PutmanQC Holdings
Mr. David BallBalls Foods
Mr. Alan ChapmanInQuest Marketing
Rev. Emanuel Cleaver IIICentennial United Methodist Church
Ms. Olivia DorseyHearst - KMBC
Mr. Neil DouthatSalomon Smith Barney
Mr. Robert EpstenMajor Brands
Ms. Marie FrasureMt. Carmel Redevelopment Corporation
Ms. Beth HallCommunity Volunteer
Mrs. Karen HermanCommunity Representative
Mr. Bob HinesOsage Marketing
Mr. David W. HowardLevy and Craig, P.C.
Mr. Rich JonesMitchell Capital Management
Ms. Dana KnottDillons
Mr. Bennie Lewis
Ms. Christina MartinNonprofit Consultant
Mr. Jon McCormickRetail Grocers Association
Ms. Judy PerryFormer Executive Director of Harvesters
Mrs. Debbie Sosland-EdelmanSosland Foundation
Mr. Mike SvetlicMunicipal Judge
Ms. Melanie M. ThompsonThompson Design Consultants, P.C.
Mr. Phil WittWDAF TV 4 (Fox)
CEO Comments
The strengths of Harvesters’ governance include clearly defined roles of the staff, President/CEO, and Board of Directors; a climate of mutual trust and respect between board and staff; and avoiding conflicts of interest (in fact and in perception) by disclosing any conflicts in a timely manner.
 
Harvesters’ strategic planning process is also very strong. It is overseen by the Board of Directors and involves the work of a committee, including representation from the board, staff, agencies, representatives from the food industry and other community volunteers. Harvesters has several community groups that serve in an advisory role and meet several times per year including the Community Advisory Council and the Agency Advisory Council. These individuals are committed to Harvesters’ mission and are involved with the organization in a variety of ways. Harvesters benefits from tremendous volunteer support through our Board of Directors and advisory groups.
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01, 2018
Fiscal Year End June 30, 2019
Projected Revenue $18,924,000
Projected Expenses $18,924,000
Endowment Value $696,832
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage 5
Foundation Comments
  • FYE 6/30/2018, 2017, 2016: Financial data reported using the IRS Form 990.
  • Foundations/corporate revenue line item may include contributions from individuals.
Detailed Financials
 
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201820172016
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$85,530,305$2,437,651$821,792
Government Contributions$17,165,943$14,665,107$17,001,959
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$17,165,943$14,665,107$17,001,959
Individual Contributions------
$443,733$314,888$343,503
$1,305,666$1,187,790$1,056,369
Investment Income, Net of Losses$185,318$129,890$63,562
Membership Dues--$0$0
Special Events$127,947$83,547$165,970
Revenue In-Kind$83,471,661$87,622,336$78,121,975
Other$79,326$133,060$74,969
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201820172016
Program Expense$98,420,686$107,305,847$92,128,655
Administration Expense$1,300,388$1,192,532$1,174,264
Fundraising Expense$1,835,016$1,948,372$1,815,485
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.030.961.03
Program Expense/Total Expenses97%97%97%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue------
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201820172016
Total Assets$31,977,907$28,914,208$28,495,973
Current Assets$26,164,021$16,427,423$9,419,266
Long-Term Liabilities$4,938,511$5,508,511$832,793
Current Liabilities$1,210,969$1,040,552$1,713,699
Total Net Assets$25,828,427$22,365,145$25,949,481
Short-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201820172016
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities21.6115.795.50
Long-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201820172016
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets15%19%3%
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201820172016
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount $14,561,751 -- --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount $10,427,029 -- --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount $5,319,265 -- --
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years No
Organization Comments

Harvesters' commitment to providing quality service to the community has served us well over the years. Harvesters uses about three percent of our resources for management and fundraising. Using GAAP standards, we are as accountable for donated food and household products as we are for every dollar donated to the organization.

Harvesters’ efficiency is largely due to donated food and volunteer time given to the organization. The food donated to Harvesters is valued at more than $85 million and volunteer time is equivalent to about 91 full-time staff members.

Our funding base is diverse, with individual donors as the largest source of financial donations. We also receive strong support from corporations, foundations, and community organizations. We are truly grateful for the community support we have received for our initiatives to provide food in the community. 
Other Documents
2018-2020 Strategic Plan2018View
Organization Name Harvesters Community Food Network
Address 3801 Topping Avenue
Kansas City, MO 641291744
Primary Phone (816) 929-3000
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Valerie Nicholson-Watson
Board Chair Mr. Dan Crumb
Board Chair Company Affiliation Kansas City Chiefs
Year of Incorporation 1979