Wounded Warrior Project
4899 Belfort Rd Ste 300
Jacksonville FL 32256
Mission Statement

The mission of Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) is to honor and empower wounded warriors. We are committed to fostering the most successful, well-adjusted generation of wounded service members in our nation’s history by providing free programs and services to address their unique needs and fill gaps in government care.

Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Michael Linnington
Board Chair Mr. Anthony K. Odierno
Board Chair Company Affiliation JP Morgan Chase
History and Background
Year of Incorporation 2005
Financial Summary
Revenue Expense Area Graph

Comparing revenue to expenses shows how the organizations finances fluctuate over time.

Source: IRS Form 990

 Breakdown
Net Gain/Loss:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.
Statements
Mission Statement

The mission of Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) is to honor and empower wounded warriors. We are committed to fostering the most successful, well-adjusted generation of wounded service members in our nation’s history by providing free programs and services to address their unique needs and fill gaps in government care.

Background Statement

WWP began in 2003 when several veterans and friends, some severely injured in previous military conflicts, were moved by the stories of the first wounded service members returning home from Afghanistan and Iraq. This group decided something different needed to be done, and took action. They wanted to provide tangible support to help those injured to heal both physically and mentally, and started packing backpacks with essential items not provided by hospitals. Some of the items included shorts, t-shirts, razors, underwear, soap, shampoo, calling cards, and playing cards. They delivered the first backpacks to Walter Reed Army Medical Center and were soon asked for more because of the positive impact they had on patients.

What these founders describe as “one wounded guy helping another” has evolved into America’s foremost advocate for those who return home with both the visible and invisible wounds of war. Over time, services provided by WWP have evolved into a full-range support system, from the first days after injury to a warrior’s transition back into civilian life and beyond.

Today, more than 100,400 injured service members and 22,900 family support members are registered with WWP nationwide and have access to free, comprehensive programs and services. This includes 2,312 warriors and 640 caregivers living throughout the states of Kansas and Missouri who are being served by regional WWP field staff located in Kansas City.
Impact Statement

Since our founding in 2003, WWP has evolved into America's foremost advocate for those who come home with the visible and invisible wounds of war. Recent successes include:

  • In March 2017, WWP proudly announced the registration of our 100,000th injured veteran. WWP is honored to serve these men and women with free, life-saving programs and services. 
  • In 2016, WWP connected more than 2,800 veterans and their families with meaningful employment, creating a $95 million economic impact. We also secured more than $80 million in benefit assets for warriors during the same time frame. 
  • In January 2016, WWP launched Warrior Care Network, an innovative collaboration with Massachusetts General Hospital, Rush University Medical Center, Emory Healthcare, and UCLA Health. Warrior Care Network provides timely, world-class mental health care at no cost to veterans and their families. In its first year, Warrior Care Network treated more than 900 patients with each receiving 70 to 80 hours of therapy. 
  • Two important pieces of legislation created by WWP have led to more than $2.5 billion in economic impact for wounded warriors and their families. Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance Traumatic Injury Protection (TSGLI) and Caregivers and Veterans Omnibus Health Services Act of 2010 provide financial assistance, health care coverage, training, and support. 
  • In 2016, WWP worked with a coalition of partners to gain approval of reproductive protection for veterans seriously wounded while serving their nation. The VA approved rules for this legislation in January 2017. 
  • WWP is an accredited charity with the Better Business Bureau, is top rated by Charity Navigator, and holds a GuideStar Platinum rating. 

Needs Statement
Since 9/11, more than 2.4 million brave men and women have been deployed around the world to fight for our country. Of those who have served, more than 52,000 have been physically injured or wounded in action. Further, an estimated one-in-three (400,000) will experience post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and one-in-five (320,000) will incur a traumatic brain injury (TBI).
Recent research from the Center for a New American Security suggests that the needs of this generation of wounded warriors are more complex than any we have faced in the past. The gap between their needs and what’s available from the government is substantial and growing.
Together, with the generous support of the American public, WWP will continue to provide free programs and services to wounded warriors, their families, and caregivers. WWP's mission is the same today as it was when the organization was founded, to honor and empower wounded warriors. WWP is here to fill gaps in service and take care of the warriors who raised their hands to step up on behalf of our great nation.
Service Categories
Human Services
Human Services
Areas of Service
National
MO
KS

WWP's national headquarters is located in Jacksonville, FL, supporting administrative and fundraising functions, in addition to local programmatic efforts. Fifteen additional regional offices are located across the county and act as service centers, delivering programmatic services and support for warriors and their families in the local area and region.

Programs
Description
During military service, warriors form bonds with one another that are as strong as family ties. WWP helps to reform those relationships after service by providing wounded warriors opportunities to connect with one another through community events and veteran support groups. We also provide easy access to local and national resources through outreach efforts and with the help of our partners. Programs include: 
  • Alumni Program
  • WWP Resource Center
  • Peer Support
  • Operation Outreach
  • Policy & Governmental Affairs 
Program Budget $29,589,970.00
Category Human Services, General/Other Services for Specific Populations
Population Served Veterans, ,
Program is linked to organization's mssion Yes
Program Frequently Assessed Yes
Short-Term Success
We expect to see the following results from Engagement Programs in 2017:
  • More than 123,000 Engagement program interactions will take place. 
  • 80% will be satisfied with Engagement programs and services. 
  • 75% will agree with the statement, "There are people who enjoy the same social activities that I do."
  • 80% will agree with the statement, "There are people I can depend on to help me if I really need it."
Long-Term Success WWP envisions a generation of warriors engaging with each other, their families, and their communities. Through WWP programs and services, they build meaningful relationships with others. They are able to lead productive lives in communities across the country surrounded by a network of support. 
Program Success Monitored By To measure the impact of our programs on wounded warriors and their families, WWP establishes key performance indicators (KPIs). Surveys and evaluations (including digital tools) are carefully planned and analyzed by an internal metrics team, along with process measures and counts tracked through a networked relationship management database (Salesforce). KPIs are monitored quarterly so course corrections can be made in a timely manner when necessary.
Examples of Program Success
Program results from the most recently completed fiscal year (October 1, 2015 to September 30, 2016) include: 
  • 48,848 warriors and 17,654 family members attended Alumni Program events. The satisfaction rate for these events was 94%.
  • More than 470 warriors and family members joined a Peer Support group with 82% reporting that participation positively impacted their life.
  • WWP staff made more than 96,000 wellness checks and outreach calls to warriors and family members through Operation Outreach.
  • The WWP Resource Center fielded 55,138 inbound calls and emails, resulting in a 90% customer satisfaction rate.
Description

WWP offers warriors and their families programs and services that help them overcome the invisible wounds of war including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury (TBI), combat stress, depression, and other invisible injuries. WWP helps warriors set and achieve mental health goals by providing effective tools and ensuring a fully supportive community and family environment. Programs include:

  • Warrior Care Network
  • Combat Stress Recovery Program
  • Project Odyssey
  • WWP Talk 
Program Budget $70,778,047.00
Category Human Services, General/Other Services for Specific Populations
Population Served Veterans, ,
Program is linked to organization's mssion Yes
Program Frequently Assessed Yes
Short-Term Success

We expect to see the following results from Mind Programs in 2017:

  •  More than 6,000 Mental Health & Wellness program interactions will take place.
  • 60% of participating warriors will improve by two points on the CD-RISC (scale used for PTSD assessment) 
  • 60% of participating warriors will improve by two points on the Veteran Rand-12 Scale (scale used to measure quality of life)
Long-Term Success We envision a generation of warriors well adjusted in mind, building the resilience needed to overcome mental health challenges. They maintain healthy relationships with their families, friends, peers, and communities. They pursue life goals with the barriers and stigmas associated with mental health issues. They have options in mental health care treatment that allow them to reach their goals. 
Program Success Monitored By To measure the impact of our programs on wounded warriors and their families, WWP establishes key performance indicators (KPIs). Surveys and evaluations (including digital tools) are carefully planned and analyzed by an internal metrics team, along with process measures and counts tracked through a networked relationship management database (Salesforce). KPIs are monitored quarterly so course corrections can be made in a timely manner when necessary.
Examples of Program Success

Program results from the most recently completed fiscal year (October 1, 2015 to September 30, 2016) include:

  • 2,898 warriors were served through the Combat Stress Recovery Program with 88% reporting they were satisfied with the mental health support they received. 
  • Project Odyssey hosted 2,664 warriors and family support members; 97% of participants responded "Yes" when asked, "As a result of your experience at Project Odyssey, will you continue or will you seek out mental health support in the future?"
  • 1,003 warriors and family support members were served through WWP Talk with 91% of participants reporting they were satisfied with the support they received. 
Description

When wounded warriors commit to making a positive change in their physical recovery, WWP is ready to help. Goal-setting, coaching, skill-building, physical training, cycling, and other opportunities provide the resources warriors need to make long-term changes toward a healthy life. Programs include:

  • Physical Health & Wellness
  • Soldier Ride  
Program Budget $8,125,786.00
Category Human Services, General/Other Services for Specific Populations
Population Served Veterans, ,
Program is linked to organization's mssion Yes
Program Frequently Assessed Yes
Short-Term Success
We expect to see the following results from Body Programs in 2017:
  • More than 12,700 Body program interactions will take place.
  • 60% of participants will improve by two points on the Veteran Rand-12 Scale (scale used to measure quality of life)
  • 60% of participants will reduce their weight by five percent.
  • 60% of participants will increase the total number of workouts by two per week.
Long-Term Success We envision a generation of warriors well-adjusted in body, living active and healthy lives. They are able to reach their fitness goals without limitations from physical challenges. With emphasis on regular exercise and weight loss, these warriors enjoy improved physical health. 
Program Success Monitored By To measure the impact of our programs on wounded warriors and their families, WWP establishes key performance indicators (KPIs). Surveys and evaluations (including digital tools) are carefully planned and analyzed by an internal metrics team, along with process measures and counts tracked through a networked relationship management database (Salesforce). KPIs are monitored quarterly so course corrections can be made in a timely manner when necessary.
Examples of Program Success

Program results from the most recently completed fiscal year (October 1, 2015 to September 30, 2016) include:

  • 13,397 warriors and 3,404 family members participated in a Physical Health & Wellness program; 98% say they will continue to seek out other sport or recreation opportunities in their community.
  • 1,610 warriors participated in Soldier Ride with 99% reporting they will continue to seek out cycling opportunities in the future.
Description

Financial stability is the cornerstone of recovery. If a warrior isn’t financially stable, it’s nearly impossible for them to focus on anything else. WWP provides Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and Department of Defense (DOD) benefit claims assistance to ease the transition to civilian life. Additionally, WWP offers career services to help warriors secure rewarding civilian careers and emergency financial assistance to help during emergent situations. Programs include:

  • Warriors to Work
  • Benefits Service
  • Emergency Financial Assistance 
Program Budget $21,148,058.00
Category Human Services, General/Other Services for Specific Populations
Population Served Veterans, ,
Program is linked to organization's mssion Yes
Program Frequently Assessed Yes
Short-Term Success

We expect to see the following results from Economic Empowerment Programs in 2017:

  •  More than 21,000 Economic Empowerment program interactions will take place. 
  • 70% will retain employment for one year.
  • Employment earnings and benefits awarded will result in an economic impact of $131 million. 
Long-Term Success We envision a generation of warriors who are economically empowered. They pursue meaningful careers and have the right tools to succeed in the workplace. They attain long-term financial stability through increased income and claiming earned benefits. 
Program Success Monitored By To measure the impact of our programs on wounded warriors and their families, WWP establishes key performance indicators (KPIs). Surveys and evaluations (including digital tools) are carefully planned and analyzed by an internal metrics team, along with process measures and counts tracked through a networked relationship management database (Salesforce). KPIs are monitored quarterly so course corrections can be made in a timely manner when necessary.
Examples of Program Success

Program results from the most recently completed fiscal year (October 1, 2015 to September 30, 2016) include:

  • Benefit claims were finalized on 15,555 issues on behalf of warriors, resulting in an economic impact of $80.7 million.
  • 2,813 warriors and family support members were successfully placed into employment, resulting in an economic impact of $95.3 million. 
Description The most severely injured warriors often need specialized care and services. When the government can’t cover what the warrior needs, WWP is there. We help ensure these warriors receive the support they need.
Program Budget $19,898,656.00
Category Human Services, General/Other Services for Specific Populations
Population Served Veterans, ,
Program is linked to organization's mssion Yes
Program Frequently Assessed Yes
Short-Term Success

We expect to see the following results from the Independence Program in 2017:

  •  More than 700 warriors will be enrolled in the Independence Program.
  • 85% of warriors will be supported in their homes and communities.
  • 60% of warriors will show improvement on the Independence Index.
  • 60% of family support members will improve two points on the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale. 
Long-Term Success We envision a generation of warriors who are empowered to achieve their full potential for independence. Warriors living with severe physical and mental injuries live life to the fullest in their homes and communities. They are surrounded by resilient caregivers and knowledgeable communities that are well equipped to provide long-term care. 
Program Success Monitored By To measure the impact of our programs on wounded warriors and their families, WWP establishes key performance indicators (KPIs). Surveys and evaluations (including digital tools) are carefully planned and analyzed by an internal metrics team, along with process measures and counts tracked through a networked relationship management database (Salesforce). KPIs are monitored quarterly so course corrections can be made in a timely manner when necessary.
Examples of Program Success

Program results from the most recently completed fiscal year (October 1, 2015 to September 30, 2016) include:

  •  602 warriors enrolled in the Independence Program.
  • Warriors reported a 78% satisfaction rate with the support and services they received. 
Executive Director/CEO
Executive Director Mr. Michael Linnington
Term Start Aug 2016
Experience

Michael Linnington serves as chief executive officer of Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP). He brings 35 years of military experience and leadership to the organization.

In this position, Michael oversees day-to-day operations and works with the executive team to set and implement the organization’s strategic vision. He is responsible for ensuring WWP’s free, direct programs and services continue to have the greatest possible impact on the warriors, caregivers, and families we serve.

“When our wounded veterans return home from combat, they rely on WWP and the organization’s dedicated team to provide necessary physical and mental health services, as well as economic empowerment and engagement programs,” says Michael. “Being part of an organization committed to this important mission is a sacred duty and solemn responsibility.”

Prior to joining WWP, Michael was the first permanent Director of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA), following his retirement as a Lieutenant General from the U.S. Army. He served as the Military Deputy to the Under Secretary of Defense (Personnel and Readiness) from 2013 to 2015 and as Commanding General, Military District of Washington and Commander, Joint Force Headquarters-National Capital Region from 2011 to 2013.

Michael also held general officer positions of responsibility as Deputy Commanding General, Fort Benning, Georgia; Commandant of Cadets, United States Military Academy, West Point, New York; and in Kabul, Afghanistan.

His military career included duties in key command and staff positions worldwide. He served on the Army Staff, the Joint Staff, and the Office of the Secretary of Defense’s Staff. His combat experience includes command of the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, in support of both Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF).

Michael graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York, in 1980. He is married with two children.

Co-CEO/Executive Director
Term Start 0
Compensation Last Year
Senior Staff
Title Chief Programs Officer
Experience/Biography

As chief programs officer, Jennifer Silva is responsible for providing strategic direction, management, and coordination for Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) programs and services.

Through the years, Jennifer has led the way in creating several new programs and business teams at WWP. In her previous role as economic empowerment executive vice president, Jennifer focused on education and employment programs for WWP Alumni. She first joined WWP as the director of the TRACK™ program and later served as program metrics and integration director, measuring the effectiveness and outcomes of all WWP programs.

Jennifer is a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point and served in the Army as a logistics officer. Before coming to WWP, Jennifer worked in the financial field, owned her own business, and was a secondary school educator.

Title Chief Development Officer
Experience/Biography

As chief development officer of Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP), Gary Corless is responsible for leading the fundraising team, while developing and executing a strategic and diversified plan to grow and manage significant fundraising efforts. Prior to this role, Gary served as WWP strategic giving executive vice president, where he focused on the vision, cultivation, and coordination of strategic partnerships, corporate and foundational giving, cause marketing, signature events, and major gifts.

Before joining WWP, Gary was president and chief executive officer of PSS World Medical, concurrently serving on the company’s board of directors. From 2002 to 2010, his extensive career with PSS World Medical included serving as chief operating officer, executive vice president, and president of the Physician Business.

Gary worked with Gulf South Medical Supply, Inc. as president from 1999 to 2002 and with Eastern Region of Diagnostic Imaging, Inc. (a former subsidiary of PSS World Medical) as senior vice president from 1998 to 1999. Gary held various other leadership positions with PSS World Medical’s Physician Business between 1990 and 1998.

Gary holds a bachelor’s degree in finance from Florida State University. He lives in Jacksonville, Florida, with his wife, Ruby, and their four children.

Title Chief of Staff
Experience/Biography

Chris Toner serves as chief of staff for Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP). He works directly with the chief executive officer (CEO) to ensure effective and efficient relationships with internal and external stakeholders and to fulfill WWP’s commitments to warriors, partners, donors, and the board of directors.

Additionally, Chris prepares for and facilitates meetings critical to the successful path of WWP. He coordinates projects and commitments directly involving the CEO and his direct reports. He is also responsible for ensuring alignment among stakeholders, leading special CEO-initiated projects, and supporting the communication needs of the leadership team with the CEO.

Before joining WWP, Chris led the Army’s Warrior Care Program as the Commander of Warrior Transition Command and the Assistant Surgeon General for Warrior Care. His military career included combat experience in Afghanistan as the Chief of Staff, 101st Airborne Division; Commander of Task Force Duke, 3d Brigade, 1st Infantry Division; and the Commander of Task Force Catamount, 2d Battalion, 87th Infantry.

Chris graduated from Emporia State University in Kansas in 1987. He is married with three sons.

Title Chief Financial Officer
Experience/Biography

Eric Miller serves as chief financial officer of Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP). In this role, he is responsible for all WWP financial strategy and, in concert with the entire executive team, assists in the development and execution of the organization’s strategic plan.

Eric joined WWP in May 2015 as finance and accounting executive vice president, where he was responsible for leading the financial reporting, financial planning and analysis, accounting services, internal audit, and purchasing teams.

Prior to joining WWP, Eric spent the first six years of his career in the audit practice of Arthur Andersen in Miami, Florida. He later moved on to Columbia Laboratories where he spent the next seven years as corporate controller. More recently, Eric spent 15 years in a senior financial leadership role at PSS World Medical where he served as a strategic business partner to sales, marketing, and operations leadership.

Eric has also served as a volunteer coach for Special Olympics and other sports programs for physically and intellectually disabled children and adults.

Eric earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Florida State University. He lives in Jacksonville, Florida, with his wife, Susan, and their three kids, Kristine, Jake, and Ben.

Staff
Paid Full-Time Staff 517
Paid Part-Time Staff 0
Volunteers 1000
Paid Contractors 20
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Plans & Policies
Organization Has a Fundraising Plan Yes
Organization Has a Strategic Plan Yes
Management Succession Plan Yes
Organization Policy and Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistleblower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
External Assessment and Accreditations
Assessment/AccreditationYear
Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance2017
Charity Navigator2017
Board Chair
Board Chair Mr. Anthony K. Odierno
Company Affiliation JP Morgan Chase
Term Sept 2014 to Sept 2020
Email executiveoffice@woundedwarriorproject.org
Board Members
NameAffiliation
Mr. Roger C. Campbell BGC Partners, Inc.
Mr. Justin Constantine Federal Bureau of Investigation
Mrs. Cari DeSantis Melwood
Mr. Kenneth Fisher Fisher House Foundation
Mr. Jaun Garcia Amazon
Mr. Richard Jones CBS
Mr. Anthony K. Odierno JP Morgan Chase
Mr. Richard Tryon University of North Florida
Dr. Jonathon Woodson Boston University Medical Center
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 0
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 9
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 8
Female 1
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria? Under Development
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 4
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Oct 01, 2016
Fiscal Year End Sept 30, 2017
Projected Revenue $238,547,386
Projected Expenses $223,777,851
Endowment Value $1,200,000
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage 5
Foundation Comments
  • FYE 9/30/2014, 2013, 2012: Financial data reported using the national organization's IRS Form 990.
  • Foundations/corporate revenue line item may include contributions from individuals.
Detailed Financials
 
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201420132012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$287,413,061$211,164,532$143,772,582
Government Contributions$0$0$0
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$0$0$0
Individual Contributions------
$4,505,445$5,751,324$3,364,908
$9,959,340$5,824,194$3,606,400
Investment Income, Net of Losses$18,040,397$2,394,868$1,929,092
Membership Dues$0$0$0
Special Events$1,687,664$1,323,885$1,135,358
Revenue In-Kind$19,912,192$7,629,668$0
Other$548,015$434,851$2,225,410
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201420132012
Program Expense$189,558,100$117,198,737$69,599,744
Administration Expense$15,006,166$9,134,900$5,412,693
Fundraising Expense$43,441,173$31,740,306$20,499,112
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.381.481.62
Program Expense/Total Expenses76%74%73%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue15%15%14%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201420132012
Total Assets$269,680,308$182,838,004$101,438,851
Current Assets$39,516,935$29,708,188$18,972,161
Long-Term Liabilities$0$0$0
Current Liabilities$21,394,825$16,439,984$11,201,098
Total Net Assets$248,285,483$166,398,020$90,237,753
Short-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities1.851.811.69
Long-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201420132012
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Organization Name Wounded Warrior Project
Address 4899 Belfort Rd Ste 300
Jacksonville, FL 32256
Primary Phone (904) 296-7350
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Michael Linnington
Board Chair Mr. Anthony K. Odierno
Board Chair Company Affiliation JP Morgan Chase
Year of Incorporation 2005