After the Harvest
406 W. 34th Street
Suite 816
Kansas City MO 64111-7511
Web and Phone Contact
Telephone (816) 921-1903
Mission Statement

 After the Harvest’s mission is to prevent hunger by rescuing fresh produce that would otherwise be wasted and distributing it to organizations that feed hungry people. We are a nonprofit serving Greater Kansas City, primarily, and the states of Kansas and Missouri.

With the help of volunteers, we glean regional farms, farmers’ markets, and orchards after they’ve been harvested and distribute the wholesome produce to nearby food banks and agencies. We also procure truckloads of fresh produce from large-scale commercial entities around the country that cannot sell it because of cosmetic imperfections. We then send the rescued produce to Harvesters and other food banks in Missouri and Kansas. In all of these instances, the fruits and vegetables, which are perfectly edible, would otherwise go to landfills.
 
Hunger in America is a serious challenge. An estimated 46.5 million Americans are food insecure, which means on a regular basis they do not know when, where, or how they will get their next meal, and they are not able to consistently access the foods they need to live a healthy life. This according to Hunger in America 2014 - the most comprehensive study of hunger in our nation, conducted by Feeding America, the nation's food bank network.
 
The study also revealed that in the 26 counties in Missouri and Kansas that are serviced by Harvesters, 45,100 people seek emergency food aid each week. Of that number, 25% are children; 20% are senior citizens; 5% are homeless; and 49% of households served include at least one adult who has worked in the last year. Demographically speaking, 59% of those served are Caucasian; 24% are African American; 9% are Hispanic and the remainder come from other racial or ethnic groups. Among those served, 27% of households include at least one veteran of military service; 29% had at least one family member in poor health; and 54% have had to choose between paying for housing and paying for food.
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Lisa Ousley
Board Chair Christina Martin
Board Chair Company Affiliation Nonprofit Consultant
History and Background
Year of Incorporation 2014
Financial Summary
Revenue Expense Area Graph

Comparing revenue to expenses shows how the organizations finances fluctuate over time.

Source: IRS Form 990

 Breakdown
Net Gain/Loss:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.
Statements
Mission Statement

 After the Harvest’s mission is to prevent hunger by rescuing fresh produce that would otherwise be wasted and distributing it to organizations that feed hungry people. We are a nonprofit serving Greater Kansas City, primarily, and the states of Kansas and Missouri.

With the help of volunteers, we glean regional farms, farmers’ markets, and orchards after they’ve been harvested and distribute the wholesome produce to nearby food banks and agencies. We also procure truckloads of fresh produce from large-scale commercial entities around the country that cannot sell it because of cosmetic imperfections. We then send the rescued produce to Harvesters and other food banks in Missouri and Kansas. In all of these instances, the fruits and vegetables, which are perfectly edible, would otherwise go to landfills.
 
Hunger in America is a serious challenge. An estimated 46.5 million Americans are food insecure, which means on a regular basis they do not know when, where, or how they will get their next meal, and they are not able to consistently access the foods they need to live a healthy life. This according to Hunger in America 2014 - the most comprehensive study of hunger in our nation, conducted by Feeding America, the nation's food bank network.
 
The study also revealed that in the 26 counties in Missouri and Kansas that are serviced by Harvesters, 45,100 people seek emergency food aid each week. Of that number, 25% are children; 20% are senior citizens; 5% are homeless; and 49% of households served include at least one adult who has worked in the last year. Demographically speaking, 59% of those served are Caucasian; 24% are African American; 9% are Hispanic and the remainder come from other racial or ethnic groups. Among those served, 27% of households include at least one veteran of military service; 29% had at least one family member in poor health; and 54% have had to choose between paying for housing and paying for food.
Background Statement
After the Harvest is a local nonprofit agency that executes the simple but profound mission of rescuing nutritious produce that would otherwise go to landfills and providing it – at no charge – to food banks and agencies that serve hungry people. Our work has three significant impacts: it combats hunger, boosts the nutritional levels of an at-risk population, and reduces food waste. The majority of the nourishing produce is provided to Harvesters – The Community Food Network, which serves 26 counties in Kansas and Missouri.
ATH was founded in May of 2014 to address the need for a locally based gleaning and produce-rescue organization. Its founding board and staff were previously affiliated with Society of St. Andrew (SoSA), a national gleaning organization, but eventually chose to form a local, independent agency that would have better control of how the donated funds were used to serve the food insecure in Kansas and Missouri.
ATH focuses on saving produce at three points of large-volume waste:
  1. In fields and orchards where fruits and vegetables are left behind after the harvest. We work with regional farmers and growers, and we engage community and faith organizations, corporations, and other volunteers to glean these sites. Importantly, we are not a faith-based organization, and so we can partner more easily with all faiths to support their hunger-relief goals by donating fresh produce.
  2. In packing sheds, where produce is graded for its marketability.
  3. At the points of sale for large truckloads of produce that are rejected because of cosmetic imperfections. ATH pays for the sourcing, packaging, and handling of these large-scale donations, and Harvesters (or other recipient food bank) pays the freight costs. A trailer-load of produce will weigh, on average, about 42,000 pounds, and the affiliated expenses for ATH are about $5,000.
In our short history, we’ve managed to increase the year-to-year quantities of produce we provide to food banks and agencies, culminating in an expected 5 million pounds for 2017 alone.
Impact Statement
After the Harvest (ATH) successfully impacts food-insecure people in Greater Kansas City and in large parts of Missouri and Kansas by providing nourishing fruits and vegetables at no charge for those who are food insecure.
  • From our inception in May 2014 to the end of the third quarter in 2017, we provided more than 10.2 million pounds of fresh produce to agencies and food banks in Missouri and Kansas.
  • In 2016 we surpassed our original goal of providing 3.1 million pounds of fresh produce to food banks and agencies; instead, we rescued and provided more than 3.6 million pounds.
  • ATH is a valuable partner for Harvesters - the Community Food Network. For the past two years, ATH has been Harvesters' largest donor of produce. ATH is able to rescue fresh produce from outside of Harvesters' service area, providing millions of pounds of fresh fruits and vegetables that the food bank would otherwise be unable to access.
  • In late 2016, ATH forged a partnership with a for-profit farmers' agent called Farmers’ Choice USA, which connects us to commercial farmers and growers who wish to donate their nutritious but unmarketable produce. Harvesters has agreed to pay the freight costs for produce, and ATH will cover the packaging, handling, and sourcing fees. These large-scale donations greatly increase the amounts and varieties of nutritious produce we can provide, and the partnership is helping us meet our 2017 goals of providing 5 million pounds of nutritious produce to Harvesters and other agencies, and providing at least 65 varieties of fruits and vegetables.
Needs Statement
To continue to succeed in our mission, ATH needs the following:
  1. Financial support: We are on track to meet our 2017 goal of providing 5 million pounds of fresh produce to feed hungry people. In 2018, we seek to raise $800,000 for packaging and handling fees so we can provide 6 million pounds of fresh produce to hungry people. For each dollar that’s donated, we can provide about 33 servings of fresh, nourishing produce.
  2. Produce donations: We work with produce industry partners to acquire semi-truckloads of fresh produce, which we distribute to food banks in Missouri and Kansas, but chiefly to Harvesters - the Community Food Network, which serves 26 counties in Missouri and Kansas. This is produce that Harvesters would not have access to because of its service-area agreement with Feeding America.
  3. Regional farmers willing to invite volunteers into their fields and orchards for gleaning after their crops have been harvested.
  4. Volunteers willing to donate their time to glean.
  5. In-kind support, equipment, consulting services (legal, accounting, IT, Salesforce training, etc.)
Service Categories
Food Programs
Human Services
Areas of Service
MO - Jackson County
KS
MO
ATH serves much of Kansas and Missouri, with an emphasis on the 26-county area that is served by Kansas City's only food bank, Harvesters - The Community Food Network. We have provided fresh produce to food banks in St. Joe, Mo.; Springfield, Mo.; Topeka, Ks.; and Wichita, Ks., to name a few.
CEO/Executive Director/Board Chair Statement
As After the Harvest’s Board President and Pro Bono Consultant, and one of the founders of the organization, I have had a rare opportunity to watch the organization grow, through both times of challenge and much success. In our first (abbreviated) year – 2014 – we rescued 1.5 million pounds of nutritious produce. In 2015, that figure increased to 2.2 million; in 2016 we reached more than 3.6 million pounds; and currently we’re on track to meet our 2017 goal of 5 million pounds. We have set a goal of providing 6 million pounds of fruits and vegetables in 2018. The majority of the produce goes to Harvesters – The Community Food Network. It is important to emphasize that without us, Harvesters and other community agencies would not receive these critical, nutritious produce donations. We retrieve large-load produce donations outside of the Kansas City area, where Harvesters is unable to recruit produce donors due to its service-area contract with Feeding America. This is one of the many ways ATH complements and does not compete with Harvesters’ efforts. We are also Harvesters’ largest and most sustainable produce donor. Often farm-fresh, our produce donations have a longer shelf life than other produce donations. In September of 2016, ATH was honored with Harvesters’ Circle of Hope Award for being its largest produce donor. We are committed to forging a myriad of multi-sector partnerships to help achieve equitable access to healthy food in our community.
 
As for other achievements, our executive director, Lisa Ousley was invited to participate in the Health Care Foundation of Greater Kansas City’s Healthy Lifestyles Leadership Academy. The Leadership Academy is a yearlong program for up to 15 individuals currently working on (or interested in working on) policy and community environment change related to healthy eating, active living and tobacco use prevention. In November of 2017, ATH is being honored at Nonprofit Connect’s Philly Awards for outstanding achievement in nonprofit communications.
 
As for challenges, weather is a chief concern. The 2017 growing season, though, has been bountiful with very few local weather issues. While we have no control over Mother Nature, we do have ways to address many barriers we face. For one, in this competitive non-profit environment, organizations are chasing too few dollars and resources, and so we have to work hard to make sure our message is heard and understood. Our message is powerful and appealing to most who hear it, and our success in this area will help us solve another key barrier -- finding sustainable funding and diversifying our funding base. Our recently hired development director will help us meet this challenge, together with updated tools and infrastructure. This will drive efficiencies and help us generate more dollars, donors, and volunteers so that we can focus our efforts more squarely on our mission of providing fresh produce for food-insecure people in Missouri and Kansas.
Programs
Description After the Harvest works with local and regional farmers and growers to glean their fields and orchards after the harvest. We engage thousands of volunteers each year in our gleaning program. Gleaning is an ancient, biblical practice whereby poor, sick, and homeless people were able to get food by “gleaning,” often walking behind the harvesters and picking up what they passed over. Today, farmers call After the Harvest when they’re done harvesting a crop, and staff and volunteers meet at the farm to gather what’s left. Farmers will also save back produce that they identify as “B-grade” – produce that is edible but not marketable. They then call After the Harvest and a staff member or volunteer goes to the farm and picks up and delivers the produce to an agency or to Harvesters.
Category Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food Distribution
Population Served General/Unspecified, ,
Short-Term Success
Studies have shown that children who eat balanced diets that include fresh fruits and vegetables perform better in school and in social settings. Our goal to get more fresh food into low-income neighborhoods and areas of need will result in better school performance, improved health in terms of diet-driven illnesses including diabetes, heart disease and obesity, and an improved sense of well-being on the part of children, families, and seniors. Another goal we have set includes increasing the number of local and regional farmers, growers and packers working with us to reduce the waste of good food and support their community through fresh produce donations.
Long-Term Success
The ultimate goal of this program is to provide nourishing, fresh food for people who cannot access it themselves, and thus change the diets and health outcomes of low-income, at-risk Kansas City area residents. Another goal of the program is to condition local farmers and growers to automatically call After the Harvest so that fresh produce isn’t wasted unnecessarily, and farmers are given the opportunity to donate food without expending valuable staff time harvesting it or finding places to donate it.
Program Success Monitored By
We have simple measures, which include
• Pounds of food provided/variety of fresh produce provided
• Number of gleaning and market pickups events held
• Number of volunteers who glean
We also have some more subjective measurements related to the impact of our work on the different populations involved, including the pantries and agencies that receive and distribute our produce, the volunteers who glean with us, the farmers with whom we work to glean and/or donate produce, and the people who receive our food from local agencies.
Examples of Program Success
It is important to note that because After the Harvest procures produce for food banks, in many instances, we are not the direct provider to the agencies or the end consumer. For example, when we secure a semi-truckload of potatoes that was rejected by a distributor, there are often up to four degrees of separation between After the Harvest and the recipient (the produce company, the driver, the receiving food bank, and the agency.) With that in mind, individual-level impact assessment is quite difficult to conduct. However, we have received some valuable anecdotal information. One senior recently shared her happy memory of sweet corn that had arrived at a local food pantry after a gleaning. “I’m seventy years old, and I’ve never tasted corn like that before. It was so good…so sweet. You know how good it was? I always share with my family and I just kept hoping that nobody came over and asked for any of it!” And, one of our gleaners mentioned: “Gleaning has changed my life, honestly. It gets me out of my head, it enables me to make a tangible difference for people in need, and it’s fun: the fresh air, the exercise, and I welcome the quiet.”
Description The Produce Procurement Program is the large-volume truckloads program of After the Harvest. Through this program we work with commercial growers and packers to secure whole truckloads of excess and B-grade produce, which we deliver to food banks in Missouri and Kansas. The produce is donated by the grower or packer, and After the Harvest pays for packaging, handling, and sourcing fees. Harvesters has committed to paying the freight costs on all truckloads secured by After the Harvest. Truckloads of rejected produce also are included in this program. When we get called on a rejected load, we usually locate the closest food bank in Missouri or Kansas and direct the truck to that location.
Category Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food Distribution
Population Served General/Unspecified, ,
Short-Term Success Short term success in our Produce Procurement Program is determined by the volume and variety of produce After the Harvest provides for Harvesters and other food banks in Missouri and Kansas. Our goal is to provide 5 million pounds of fresh produce in 2017 and 6 million pounds in 2018.
Long-Term Success The ultimate goal of this program is to provide nourishing, fresh food for people who cannot access it themselves, and thus change the diets and health outcomes of low-income, at-risk Kansas City area residents. Another goal of this program is to develop partnerships with national and regional growers, packers and trucking firms to ensure a steady flow of fresh produce into Harvesters and other Missouri and Kansas food banks.
Program Success Monitored By Our simple measurements for this program include number of pounds and variety of produce donated, as well as number of large-volume donors partnering with After the Harvest.
Examples of Program Success In 2017, 2018 and beyond, we will partner with Farmers' Choice to provide an increasing volume and variety of nutritious fresh produce to food banks feeding hungry families. Harvesters is our largest distribution partner for our Produce Procurement Program.
CEO Comments
I'm pleased at the progress After the Harvest experienced in our programs thus far in 2017.
  • Our Gleaning Network continues to expand in terms of the number of farmers in our network and the number of businesses, community organizations and organizations providing gleaners. The growing season in 2017 was a good one, with no severe climate challenges. In 2018, we look forward to expanding the footprint of the Gleaning Network in both Missouri and Kansas.
  • Our partnerships with Farmers Choice USA and Harvesters - the Community Food Network grew in 2017 as we worked together to meet our goals. We started the year with commitments from both partners that would enable After the Harvest to provide 5 million pounds of fresh produce to feed hungry people. Farmers Choice agreed to provide access to at least 100 truckloads in 2017, and Harvesters agreed to pay freight costs on at least 100 truckloads. As of the end of the third quarter, After the Harvest is on target to provide 5 million pounds of fresh produce for hungry people in 2017.
In looking toward 2018 and beyond, After the Harvest and Harvesters will collaborate to increase not only the volume but more importantly, the variety and the nutrient value of produce we provide. Beginning in 2018, the two organizations will work together with Farmers Choice USA and other produce partners to focus on expanding the variety of produce types – pineapple, pears, citrus, a variety of greens – offerings that are lacking in traditional food bank selections.
 
In addition to Harvesters and Farmers’ Choice, After the Harvest continues to work with The Giving Grove and Fresh Farm HQ, valued partners with whom we anticipate growing relationships in 2018 and beyond.

Executive Director/CEO
Executive Director Lisa Ousley
Term Start May 2014
Experience

Lisa Ousley, founding director of After the Harvest, speaks to groups regularly on the topics of hunger and food insecurity in the United States. Before opening After the Harvest, she served as founding director of the Western Headquarters of the Society of St. Andrew, a position she held for six years. During that time the small, two-person team, with the help of many volunteers, provided more than 15 million pounds of produce for hungry people in Missouri, Kansas, and other states west of the Mississippi River. Other nonprofit work included volunteering for and serving as a membership services director for a national hunger relief network.
Lisa’s background in communications, marketing, and public affairs serves her well in her efforts to communicate the compelling mission of After the Harvest.
 
Lisa received a Bachelor of Arts degree in English/Mass Media-Communications from the College of the Ozarks. In addition to nonprofit work, her career includes reporting and editing for news media, employee communications, investor relations, marketing, communications, and public affairs.

Co-CEO/Executive Director
Term Start 0
Compensation Last Year
Senior Staff
Title Outreach and Communications Director
Title Development Director
Staff
Paid Full-Time Staff 6
Paid Part-Time Staff 3
Volunteers 1500
Paid Contractors 0
Retention Rate 100%
Staff Diversity (Ethnicity)
Caucasian 6
Staff Diversity (Gender)
Female 6
Male 0
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Plans & Policies
Organization Has a Fundraising Plan Yes
Organization Has a Strategic Plan Yes
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Organization Policy and Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistleblower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Collaborations

Through collaborations with the produce industry and freight brokers, as well as with local and regional farms and farmers' markets, we are able to secure produce donations. Community partners are also a part of this collaboration.
 
After the Harvest also participates in several area policy-level efforts that create collaborations across multiple sectors. Included in these are the Greater Kansas City Food Policy Coalition, Johnson County Food Policy Council; Healthy Communities Wyandotte; and the Healthy Eating Team of Healthy KC. After the Harvest’s role in these efforts is to ensure that low-income and disadvantaged residents have access to nutritious fresh produce.
 
Lisa is also a founding board member of The Giving Grove, which helps at-risk communities grow, harvest, and share nutritious fruit, nuts, and berries by providing the resources to plant edible tree gardens on school and community grounds and unused vacant land. As tree gardens mature around the city, ATH volunteers will glean the fruit and nut trees after residents have harvested their portion, ensuring that a portion of the produce from each garden is used to feed people in need in the Kansas City area.
 
Additionally, After the Harvest partners with Harvesters, Fresh Farm HQ, the regional food hub, and Farmers' Choice, a farmers' agent in Florida, our newest partner.

Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Circle of Hope Award for Product DonationHarvesters - the Community Food Network2016
Nonprofit ConnectAward for Outstanding Achievement in Nonprofit Communications2017
CEO Comments

  • As of September 30, 2017, After the Harvest is fully staffed for the first time since its inception. We started the organization with two employees and have gradually grown to a full-time staff of six, and a seasonal, part-time staff of three. We believe this team will provide us with the skills, expertise, and talent to successfully grow to meet our goals for the next several years.
  • At the end of the first quarter 2017, we hired a volunteer coordinator, whose duties are focused primarily on the Gleaning Network. As a result, we saw measurable improvements in volunteer recruitment, satisfaction and retention that resulted in growth in the number of gleanings, number of gleaning occurrences, and number of total hours gleaned. In 2017 we also expanded our outreach to local and regional farmers and growers with an end goal of a greater variety of produce types gleaned and more total pounds of produce gleaned.
  • In August, we hired a development director, a position funded by a grant from the Hall Family Foundation. Megan Hunter has already proven valuable in the execution of our first ticketed fundraiser, Greens&Jeans, held Sept.16, and we look forward to her help in diversifying our funding in the coming year.
  • In 2017, ATH made a concerted effort to expand and diversify our board of directors, adding six new board members in May, as two ended their service on the board. Board development was provided to help the new board focus on its duties to the organization, especially regarding fund-raising efforts.
  • After the Harvest is also developing an employee handbook. We have already implemented many critical policies and will work to draft and implement the remaining policies in the coming year.

Board Chair
Board Chair Christina Martin
Company Affiliation Nonprofit Consultant
Term May 2014 to Apr 2020
Email martin1c@aol.com
Board Members
NameAffiliation
Ryan Chiaverini Financial Planner, Creative Planning
Mary Dees Community Representative
Deanna Diebolt HR, Demdaco
Elisa Haake Marketing Consultant
Vickie Harris Human Resources Consultant
Joelsette Hernandez-Jones Founder & CEO, Pharos Partners
Sally Luck Hallmark
Christina Martin Nonprofit Consulting
Jim Merrill Retired
Matt Merrill Attorney, Brown and Ruprecht, PC Attorneys at Law
Kelly Schwalbe Sr. Lartner, Sage Communications
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 8
Hispanic/Latino 2
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 4
Female 7
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 81%
Written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 90%
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 10
Standing Committees
Advisory Board / Advisory Council
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Marketing
Community Outreach / Community Relations
Advisory Board Members
NameAffiliation
Scott Burnett Jackson County Legislature
Congressman Emmanuel Cleaver U.S. House of Representatives
Diana Endicott Good Natured Family Farms
Kathy Jantsch American Century Investments
Beth Low KC Healthy Kids
Sally Luck Hallmark
Christina Martin Consultant
Jim Merrill Retired
Judy Perry Retired
Phil Pisciotta Fresh Food Express
Rob Reiman Giving Grove
Anne Tierney Community Volunteer
Mike Wedel Harvesters
CEO Comments

In 2017, ATH staff and board members made a concerted effort to expand and diversify our board of directors, adding six new members in May, as two ended their service on the board. For the first time in its short history, ATH’s board of directors reached capacity. Board development was provided to help the new board focus on its duties to the organization, especially regarding fundraising efforts. The board of directors is transitioning from being a working board for a new startup to a governing board of an established organization. To date, 100% of its members support the organization with financial resources and in-kind services.
In early 2017, After the Harvest sought to redefine its advisory board, breaking the group into Yambassadors (ambassadors for ATH) and an executive advisory council of industry experts who would serve to consult with the organization regarding their areas of expertise. This effort is in process, though the two groups have yet to formally convene.

Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01, 2017
Fiscal Year End Dec 31, 2017
Projected Revenue $1,221,968
Projected Expenses $1,146,426
Foundation Comments
  • FY 2015, 4/8/2014 - 12/31/2014: Financial data reported using IRS Form 990.
  • Foundations/corporate revenue line item may include contributions from individuals.
Detailed Financials
 
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$948,878$832,542--
Administration Expense$58,676$44,270--
Fundraising Expense$29,545$16,643--
Payments to Affiliates--$0--
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.221.17--
Program Expense/Total Expenses91%93%--
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue4%5%--
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$407,578$189,400--
Current Assets$385,949$189,400--
Long-Term Liabilities$0$0--
Current Liabilities$28,745$36,447--
Total Net Assets$378,833$152,953--
Short-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities13.435.20--
Long-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%--
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountAnonymous $175,000Anonymous $160,000--
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountAnonymous $170,000Anonymous $75,000--
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountAnonymous $100,000Anonymous $50,000--
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Organization Comments

Through the dedication and effort of staff and board members and strong partnerships with funders, supporters, produce partners, volunteers, and agencies and food banks, After the Harvest is on target to meet its goal of 5 million pounds of fresh produce in 2017, and continue to grow its work by one million pounds annually for the next four years.
 
Through annual planning sessions and reporting against the plan, we have been able to remain focused on our original strategic plan, which ends on Dec. 31, 2017. We are looking forward to beginning a new strategic plan in January 2018, and anticipate continued growth in 2018 and beyond.

Organization Name After the Harvest
Address 406 W. 34th Street
Suite 816
Kansas City, MO 641117511
Primary Phone (816) 921-1903
CEO/Executive Director Lisa Ousley
Board Chair Christina Martin
Board Chair Company Affiliation Nonprofit Consultant
Year of Incorporation 2014