After the Harvest
406 W. 34th Street
Suite 816
Kansas City MO 64111-7511
Web and Phone Contact
Telephone (816) 921-1903
Fax 816- 931-1902
Mission Statement
After the Harvest’s mission is to fight hunger, improve nutrition, and reduce food waste by rescuing fresh produce and distributing it to organizations that feed hungry people.
 
Founded on May 19, 2014 in Kansas City, ATH provides a simple yet profound way to feed people year-round by saving fresh produce that would otherwise go to waste and getting it to people who would otherwise go hungry. We do this by targeting the two main points of large-volume food waste: (1) farmers’ fields after the harvest and (2) packing operations where produce is prepared for shipping to markets. ATH is on target to provide  3.4 million pounds of fresh produce to food banks and feeding agencies in Missouri and Kansas in 2019.
 
In ATH’s Produce Procurement Program, farmers, growers, and produce-packing plants donate tractor-trailer loads of nutritious produce that cannot be sold due to cosmetic imperfections. We then arrange for its packaging, handling, and safe transport to food banks and feeding agencies in Missouri and Kansas, focusing primarily on the 26-county area that encompasses Kansas City. Harvesters – The Community Food Network, Kansas City’s only food bank, is our primary distribution partner for large truckloads of produce we provide. In fact, ATH is Harvesters' largest local produce donor.
 
Through our Gleaning Program, farmers and growers donate their fields and orchards after harvest for gleaning by ATH volunteers. Diverse groups of volunteers from faith congregations, civic and community organizations, and corporations gather crops that would otherwise be left to rot or to be plowed under. The resulting produce is packaged by volunteers and promptly transported to food banks and agencies. By the end of the third quarter in 2019, our Gleaning Network garnered 66 varieties of farm-fresh fruits and vegetables. We recruited 781 volunteers, which resulted in 921 volunteer experiences. Gleaners provided 2,865 hours of volunteer labor, valued at approximately $28,650.
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Lisa Ousley
Board Chair Ryan Chiaverini
Board Chair Company Affiliation Meritage Portfolio Management
History and Background
Year of Incorporation 2014
Volunteer Opportunities
Ways to donate, support, or volunteer
  • To donate online, go to www.aftertheharvestkc.org and click the donate button. You can access this website by mobile device or computer. 
  • To donate by check, please mail your check to:
            After the Harvest
            406 W. 34th Street; Suite 816
            Kansas City, MO 64111-7511
  • To volunteer, please go to www.aftertheharvestkc.org and click Get Involved and scroll down to click Volunteers. Once you are on the volunteer page, click the link in the sentence "Sign up to become an After the Harvest Volunteer Member." Then you can fill out the online form to become an After the Harvest volunteer.
Financial Summary
Revenue Expense Area Graph

Comparing revenue to expenses shows how the organizations finances fluctuate over time.

Source: IRS Form 990

 Breakdown
Net Gain/Loss:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.
Statements
Mission Statement
After the Harvest’s mission is to fight hunger, improve nutrition, and reduce food waste by rescuing fresh produce and distributing it to organizations that feed hungry people.
 
Founded on May 19, 2014 in Kansas City, ATH provides a simple yet profound way to feed people year-round by saving fresh produce that would otherwise go to waste and getting it to people who would otherwise go hungry. We do this by targeting the two main points of large-volume food waste: (1) farmers’ fields after the harvest and (2) packing operations where produce is prepared for shipping to markets. ATH is on target to provide  3.4 million pounds of fresh produce to food banks and feeding agencies in Missouri and Kansas in 2019.
 
In ATH’s Produce Procurement Program, farmers, growers, and produce-packing plants donate tractor-trailer loads of nutritious produce that cannot be sold due to cosmetic imperfections. We then arrange for its packaging, handling, and safe transport to food banks and feeding agencies in Missouri and Kansas, focusing primarily on the 26-county area that encompasses Kansas City. Harvesters – The Community Food Network, Kansas City’s only food bank, is our primary distribution partner for large truckloads of produce we provide. In fact, ATH is Harvesters' largest local produce donor.
 
Through our Gleaning Program, farmers and growers donate their fields and orchards after harvest for gleaning by ATH volunteers. Diverse groups of volunteers from faith congregations, civic and community organizations, and corporations gather crops that would otherwise be left to rot or to be plowed under. The resulting produce is packaged by volunteers and promptly transported to food banks and agencies. By the end of the third quarter in 2019, our Gleaning Network garnered 66 varieties of farm-fresh fruits and vegetables. We recruited 781 volunteers, which resulted in 921 volunteer experiences. Gleaners provided 2,865 hours of volunteer labor, valued at approximately $28,650.
Background Statement
After the Harvest is a local nonprofit agency that executes the simple but profound mission of rescuing nutritious produce that would otherwise go to waste in landfills and providing it to food banks and agencies that serve hungry people. Our work has three significant impacts: it combats hunger, boosts the nutritional levels of an at-risk population, and reduces food waste. The majority of the nourishing produce we secure is distributed through Harvesters – The Community Food Network, which serves 26 counties in Kansas and Missouri.
 
ATH was founded in May of 2014 to address the need for a locally based gleaning and produce-rescue organization. Its founding board and staff were previously affiliated with Society of St. Andrew (SoSA), a national gleaning organization, but eventually chose to form a local, independent agency that would have better control of how the donated funds were used to serve the food insecure in Kansas and Missouri.
 
ATH focuses on saving produce at two points of large-volume waste:
  1. In fields and orchards where fruits and vegetables are left behind after the harvest. We work with local and regional farmers and growers, and we engage community and faith organizations, corporations, and other volunteers to glean these sites. Importantly, because we are not a faith-based organization, we are able to partner more easily with congregations of all faiths to support their hunger-relief goals by donating fresh produce.
  2. In packing sheds, where produce is graded for its marketability. ATH works to secure truckloads of produce that is graded out for cosmetic reasons. ATH now shares the costs for the sourcing, packaging, and handling of these large-scale donations with Harvesters. A trailer-load of produce will weigh, on average, about 42,000 pounds, and the packaging, handling, and sourcing fees are about $5,000 per load. By sharing the costs, ATH is able to secure more truckloads for distribution through Harvesters. Additionally, Harvesters pays the freight costs for these truckloads. 
Impact Statement
In 2018, ATH provided more than 3.1 million pounds of a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables to agencies in Missouri and Kansas. To date, we are on target to provide 3.4 million pounds of produce in 2019.
  • ATH partners closely with Harvesters - the Community Food Network to provide nourishing food for families, children, and seniors struggling with food insecurity in the Kansas City region. In fact, for the past four years, ATH has been Harvesters' largest local produce donor. ATH is able to rescue fresh produce from outside of Harvesters' service area, providing millions of pounds of fresh fruits and vegetables that the food bank would not otherwise have been able to access.
  • From its inception in May 2014 through September, 2019, ATH has provided more than 17 million pounds of fresh produce to agencies and food banks in Missouri and Kansas.
  • Through our partnership with Farmers Choice USA, we provide not only volume but variety. ATH provided 72 varieties of produce in 2018.
In addition to our continued focus on fresh produce, ATH has achieved the following milestones in 2019:
  • We completed our first outcomes study with Dr. Cheryl Gibson, University of Kansas, and held two outcomes study luncheons to announce the results.
  • We worked with a Certified Fund Raising Executive to increase our funding and diversify our funding streams.
  • We continued board development and recruitment. We now have 11 board members.
  • With the support of the Health Forward Foundation and the Kansas Health Foundation, ATH secured technical expertise to upgrade our Salesforce database and train our staff in its use; and to redesign our website, complete with an upgrade to the Classy fundraising platform. These two technology upgrades will facilitate communication with volunteers, donors and other partners, and help ATH build and retain relationships to enable us to grow our efforts to provide fresh produce for hungry people.
 
Needs Statement
To succeed in our mission, ATH needs the following:
  1. Financial support: Through our partnership with Farmers Choice USA, ATH has access to millions of pounds of nourishing fresh produce, but each truckload costs about $5,000 in packaging, handling, and sourcing fees. ATH needs additional funding to provide this bounty to food-insecure families, children, and seniors in our community.
  2. Core operating support: ATH needs support in covering basic operations, including salaries, occupancy expenses, and other administrative expenses. Often, we find that foundations and other funders want to support program expenses but aren't willing to help us fund day-to-day operations of our organization. If we cannot pay our staff, there will be no one to carry out the mission.
  3. Farmers willing to invite ATH and their volunteers into their fields and orchards for gleaning after crops have been harvested.
  4. Volunteers willing to donate their time to glean.
  5. Partners from corporations, faith congregations, organizations, and the community who will join us in support of our mission.
Service Categories
Food Programs
Human Services
Recycling
Areas of Service
MO - Jackson County
KS
MO
Geographic Area Served Narrative

ATH provides fresh produce for the 141,500 people who seek emergency food assistance in 26 counties in metropolitan Kansas City, northwestern Missouri, and northeastern Kansas:

CEO/Executive Director/Board Chair Statement

As the current board president and a board member for the past two years, I’ve seen the growth and evolution of ATH and the tremendous impact it has on helping provide nutritious produce to the needy. Since ATH opened in mid-2014, it has rescued more than 14 million pounds of produce. The produce comes from organized volunteer gleaning at local farms and from truckloads of donated produce, with the majority going to Harvesters – The Community Food Network. It is important to emphasize that without us Harvesters and other agencies would not receive these critical donations.

Thanks to a partnership with a farmers-agent in Florida, ATH can access truckloads of produce across the country throughout the year, produce that Harvesters can't procure due to its service-area contract with Feeding America. This is one of the ways ATH complements and does not compete with Harvesters. ATH is Harvesters’ largest and most sustainable produce donor. For the past three years, ATH has received Harvesters’ Circle of Hope Award for being its largest produce donor.

As for other achievements, our executive director, Lisa Ousley was invited to participate in the Health Care Foundation of Greater Kansas City’s Healthy Lifestyles Leadership Academy, a yearlong program for up to 15 individuals currently working on policy and community environment change related to healthy eating, active living, and tobacco use prevention. In November 2017, ATH was honored with Nonprofit Connect’s Philly Award for outstanding achievement in nonprofit communications.

However, the organization does face significant challenges.Weather during the growing season and access to funding are the organization’s biggest concerns. While we have no control over Mother Nature, ATH does have ways to access significant amounts of produce throughout the year. And, in this competitive non-profit environment, organizations are chasing fewer dollars and resources. As a result, our small but mighty staff works hard to achieve the ATH mission.

Recently, the board approved a strategic plan that will guide the organization over the next three years. In September, we hired a development consultant who will help us meet this challenge, together with a pending new website and other infrastructure. These efforts will drive efficiencies and help us generate more dollars, donors, and volunteers so that we can further drive our mission of providing fresh produce for food-insecure people in Missouri and Kansas.

Programs
Description After the Harvest works with local and regional farmers and growers to glean their fields and orchards after the harvest. We engage thousands of volunteers each year in our gleaning program. Gleaning is an ancient, biblical practice whereby poor, sick, and homeless people were able to get food by “gleaning,” often walking behind the harvesters and picking up what they passed over. Today, farmers call After the Harvest when they’re done harvesting a crop, and staff and volunteers meet at the farm to gather what’s left. Farmers will also save back produce that they identify as “B-grade” – produce that is edible but not marketable. They then call After the Harvest and a staff member or volunteer goes to the farm and picks up and delivers the produce to an agency or to Harvesters.
Category Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food Distribution
Population Served General/Unspecified
Short-Term Success
Studies have shown that children who eat balanced diets that include fresh fruits and vegetables perform better in school and in social settings. Our goal to get more fresh food into low-income neighborhoods and areas of need will result in better school performance, improved health in terms of diet-driven illnesses including diabetes, heart disease and obesity, and an improved sense of well-being on the part of children, families, and seniors. Another goal we have set includes increasing the number of local and regional farmers, growers and packers working with us to reduce the waste of good food and support their community through fresh produce donations.
Long-Term Success
The ultimate goal of this program is to provide nourishing, fresh food for people who cannot access it themselves, and thus change the diets and health outcomes of low-income, at-risk Kansas City area residents. Another goal of the program is to condition local farmers and growers to automatically call After the Harvest so that fresh produce isn’t wasted unnecessarily, and farmers are given the opportunity to donate food without expending valuable staff time harvesting it or finding places to donate it.
Program Success Monitored By
We have simple measures, which include
• Pounds of food provided/variety of fresh produce provided
• Number of gleaning and market pickups events held
• Number of volunteers who glean
We also have some more subjective measurements related to the impact of our work on the different populations involved, including the pantries and agencies that receive and distribute our produce, the volunteers who glean with us, the farmers with whom we work to glean and/or donate produce, and the people who receive our food from local agencies.
Examples of Program Success
It is important to note that because After the Harvest procures produce for food banks, in many instances, we are not the direct provider to the agencies or the end consumer. For example, when we secure a semi-truckload of potatoes that was rejected by a distributor, there are often up to four degrees of separation between After the Harvest and the recipient (the produce company, the driver, the receiving food bank, and the agency.) With that in mind, individual-level impact assessment is quite difficult to conduct. However, we have received some valuable anecdotal information. One senior recently shared her happy memory of sweet corn that had arrived at a local food pantry after a gleaning. “I’m seventy years old, and I’ve never tasted corn like that before. It was so good…so sweet. You know how good it was? I always share with my family and I just kept hoping that nobody came over and asked for any of it!” And, one of our gleaners mentioned: “Gleaning has changed my life, honestly. It gets me out of my head, it enables me to make a tangible difference for people in need, and it’s fun: the fresh air, the exercise, and I welcome the quiet.”
Description The Produce Procurement Program is the large-volume truckloads program of After the Harvest. Through this program we work with commercial growers and packers to secure whole truckloads of excess and B-grade produce, which we deliver to food banks in Missouri and Kansas. The produce is donated by the grower or packer, and After the Harvest pays for packaging, handling, and sourcing fees. Harvesters has committed to paying the freight costs on all truckloads secured by After the Harvest. Truckloads of rejected produce also are included in this program. When we get called on a rejected load, we usually locate the closest food bank in Missouri or Kansas and direct the truck to that location.
Category Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food Distribution
Population Served General/Unspecified
Short-Term Success Short term success in our Produce Procurement Program is determined by the volume and variety of produce After the Harvest provides for Harvesters and other food banks in Missouri and Kansas. Our goal is to provide 5 million pounds of fresh produce in 2017 and 6 million pounds in 2018.
Long-Term Success The ultimate goal of this program is to provide nourishing, fresh food for people who cannot access it themselves, and thus change the diets and health outcomes of low-income, at-risk Kansas City area residents. Another goal of this program is to develop partnerships with national and regional growers, packers and trucking firms to ensure a steady flow of fresh produce into Harvesters and other Missouri and Kansas food banks.
Program Success Monitored By Our simple measurements for this program include number of pounds and variety of produce donated, as well as number of large-volume donors partnering with After the Harvest.
Examples of Program Success In 2017, 2018 and beyond, we will partner with Farmers' Choice to provide an increasing volume and variety of nutritious fresh produce to food banks feeding hungry families. Harvesters is our largest distribution partner for our Produce Procurement Program.
CEO Comments
Our Gleaning Program saw changes in 2019 with the departure of Emily Worm, Gleaning Program Manager. Emily joined the staff as a seasonal gleaning coordinator in 2015, and was hired as program manager in 2016. Over the next three years, she built a strong program, expanding the number of farmers in the program and developing a more structured gleaning process. Emily worked with Sandy Vivian, who was our first outreach coordinator, to design and develop a web-based gleaning sign-up calendar that allows volunteers to choose a date for a gleaning months in advance and get it on their own calendars for planning purposes.
 
Emily developed the ATH gleaning program to be a nationally recognized model, one for which she was recognized at national gleaning conferences, and pursued for advice related to program issues and challenges. Before she left in June 2019, Emily recruited, hired and trained Zach Callaway, also a former seasonal gleaning coordinator, to step into her shoes. As the gleaning season winds down, Zach is already looking ahead, with plans to grow the geographical footprint of the ATH Gleaning Program in 2020.
 
The Gleaning Program couldn’t operate without volunteers. Mariah Friend joined the team in 2016 as a seasonal gleaning coordinator, and took on the role of Volunteer Coordinator in 2017. She has worked with Sandy Vivian, who is now serving as ATH’s Marketing Director, to develop a volunteer program that keeps volunteers engaged and keeps them coming back. After the Harvest offers a unique volunteer experience. There is no other gleaning organization in this region. A flagship of the volunteer program is our VEG Squad – the Vegetable Emergency Glean Squad. This band of dedicated gleaners can be summoned at a moment’s notice when one of our farmers calls in with a last-minute gleaning.
 
While our Gleaning Program is our face to the community, providing a great volunteer opportunity, it is through our Produce Procurement Program that we provide the greatest volume of fresh produce. ATH works with Farmers’ Choice USA to get truckloads of fresh produce into Harvesters. We are on target to provide around 81 truckloads of fresh produce to Harvesters in 2019. The variety is more limited, (16 varieties last year), but the produce is often more shelf-stable. Lisa Ousley, executive director at ATH, runs this program.
Executive Director/CEO
Executive Director Lisa Ousley
Term Start May 2014
Experience

Lisa Ousley, founding director of After the Harvest, speaks to groups regularly on the topics of hunger and food insecurity in the United States. Before opening After the Harvest, she served as founding director of the Western Headquarters of the Society of St. Andrew, a position she held for six years. During that time the small, two-person team, with the help of many volunteers and a dedicated Advisory Board, provided more than 15 million pounds of produce for hungry people in Missouri, Kansas, and other states west of the Mississippi River.
 
Lisa's previous nonprofit work included volunteering for and serving as a membership services director for a national hunger relief network. Her background in communications, marketing, and public affairs serves her well in her efforts to communicate the compelling mission of After the Harvest.
 
Lisa received a Bachelor of Arts degree in English/Mass Media-Communications from the College of the Ozarks. In addition to nonprofit work, her career includes reporting and editing for news media, employee communications, investor relations, marketing, communications, and public affairs.

Senior Staff
Title Outreach and Communications Director
Staff
Paid Full-Time Staff 5
Paid Part-Time Staff 3
Paid Contractors 1
Volunteers 1000
Retention Rate 80%
Staff Diversity (Ethnicity)
African American/Black 1
Caucasian 7
Staff Diversity (Gender)
Female 7
Male 1
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Plans & Policies
Organization Has a Fundraising Plan Yes
Organization Has a Strategic Plan Yes
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Organization Policy and Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistleblower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Collaborations

Through collaborations with the produce industry and freight brokers, as well as with local and regional farms and farmers' markets, we secure produce donations. Community partners are also a part of this collaboration.
 
ATH also participates in several area policy-level efforts that create collaborations across multiple sectors. Included in these are the Greater Kansas City Food Policy Coalition; Johnson County Food Policy Council; Healthy Communities Wyandotte; and the Healthy Eating Team of Healthy KC. Our role in these efforts is to ensure that low-income and disadvantaged residents have access to nutritious fresh produce.
 
Lisa Ousley is also a founding board member of The Giving Grove, which helps at-risk communities grow, harvest, and share nutritious fruit, nuts, and berries by providing the resources to plant edible tree gardens on school and community grounds and unused vacant land. As tree gardens mature, ATH volunteers will glean the fruit and nut trees after residents have harvested their portion, ensuring that a portion of the produce from each garden is used to feed people in need.
 
Additionally, ATH partners with Harvesters, KC Food Hub, and Farmers' Choice, a farmers' agent in Florida.

Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Circle of Hope Award for Product DonationHarvesters - the Community Food Network2016
Nonprofit ConnectAward for Outstanding Achievement in Nonprofit Communications2017
Ingrams MagazineLocal Heroes Award2018
CEO Comments

One of the lessons learned by the board and staff at After the Harvest in 2018 was this: an organization cannot successfully grow its mission without first growing the resources needed to support that mission.

When we first connected with Farmers Choice USA, we felt like the flood gates had opened. Prior to 2017, we provided mostly white potatoes, with the occasional load of sweet potatoes or carrots. Coming from the Midwest, I didn’t have connections to many produce farmers. Then a former colleague introduced me to Gail Starratt, just before she opened the doors to Farmers Choice USA. Gail had a background in farming and food banking, so when she started Farmers Choice, her mission was two-fold: help farmers sell their seconds and provide the nonprofit food system with better access to fresh produce. Each truckload of produce costs an average of $5,000 in packaging, handling and sourcing fees.

Overnight, After the Harvest had access to a wide variety of fresh fruits and vegetables by the truckload. We struck a three-way partnership with Farmers Choice and Harvesters, committing to provide five million pounds of fresh produce to Harvesters in the 2017 calendar year. It seemed that our funding was falling into place to support this stretch goal – we had never provided more than 3.2 million pounds of produce in a single year – and we were excited to see this dream come true. The sky was the limit. We had plans to grow by a million pounds each year for the next five years.

Then in December of 2017, a couple of important grants fell through and the timing on other grant funding changed, and ATH ended the year with a deficit. We had made our 5 million pound goal, but we spent much of 2018 making up for it.

We have since worked with Harvesters to share the cost of each truckload we provide. Harvesters also covers the freight on each truckload we secure. And we recognized that we have to grow our volume incrementally, as we increase our resources to support our program.

Board Chair
Board Chair Ryan Chiaverini
Company Affiliation Meritage Portfolio Management
Term May 2017 to Apr 2020
Email ryanchiaverini7@gmail.com
Board Members
NameAffiliation
Emily AikensHallmark
Ryan ChiaveriniFinancial Planner, Creative Planning
Mary DeesCommunity Representative
Deanna DieboltHR, Demdaco
Vickie HarrisHuman Resources Consultant
Sally LuckHallmark
Christina MartinNonprofit Consulting
Jim MerrillRetired
Matt MerrillAttorney, Brown and Ruprecht, PC Attorneys at Law
Alyssa PrasilSenior Vice President, Treasury & Operations, Bank of Labor
Russ WeathersAgriculture Future of America
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 10
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 4
Female 7
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 81%
Written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 90%
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 10
Standing Committees
Finance
CEO Comments
The board of directors of After the Harvest has worked to connect our organization to new opportunities for growth and funding thus far in 2019. Ryan Chiaverini is president of the board this year. Ryan has served as treasurer over the past two years and remains focused on funding the organization. He is working with Alyssa Prasil, the 2019 board treasurer, who joined the board in 2018. Russ Weathers, retired president and current chairman of the Board of Agriculture Futures of America, joined the ATH board in May 2019. He is helping ATH to establish connections within the commercial agriculture industry, a logical partner in overall efforts to feed people in our community. Emily Aikens also joined the ATH board in 2109. Emily’s history with the Kansas City Food Circle and passion for sustainable farming will help strengthen the organization’s connections with organic and sustainable farming in the Kansas City region.
 
ATH board and staff will continue their efforts to build our board as we move into 2020. This is especially important because our founding board members, Sally Luck, Jim Merrill and Christina Martin, will be rolling off in April 2020. Their leadership has been pivotal in the success of ATH since its inception. Christina, who has also served as a pro bono consultant and grant writer, has been especially important to the success of the organization. Through her dedication and expertise, ATH has successfully pursued grant funding that, at one point in the organization’s history, comprised 95% (check this number) of its funding. Christina will continue her work into 2020, as our new fund development director, Victoria Cherry, acclimates to the organization.
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01, 2019
Fiscal Year End Dec 31, 2019
Projected Revenue $1,105,000
Projected Expenses $1,041,332
Foundation Comments
  • FY 2018, 2017, 2016: Financial data reported using IRS Form 990.
  • Foundations/corporate revenue line item may include contributions from individuals.
Detailed Financials
 
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201820172016
Program Expense$2,233,155$3,279,931$1,606,896
Administration Expense$213,189$144,857$98,617
Fundraising Expense$105,552$76,219$28,965
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.980.961.06
Program Expense/Total Expenses88%94%93%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue------
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201820172016
Total Assets$406,556$478,892$495,054
Current Assets$372,997$435,672$441,961
Long-Term Liabilities$1,706$2,936$3,983
Current Liabilities$109,617$138,269$12,582
Total Net Assets$295,233$337,687$478,489
Short-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201820172016
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities3.403.1535.13
Long-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201820172016
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%1%1%
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201820172016
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- --Anonymous $200,000
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- --Anonymous $200,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- --Anonymous $60,000
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Organization Comments
Throughout 2018 and 2019, After the Harvest has been pursuing improvements and upgrades in its communication and fundraising technologies. Database improvements made over the past two years have enabled us to streamline and improve tracking and reporting of our program and fundraising metrics. A new, web-based fundraising platform implemented in the second quarter of 2019 has already paid off in terms of user-friendly fundraising campaigns. And with a new website ready to launch in December 2019, we will showcase our new brand standards and seamless integration of technology platforms that will enable us to hone in on our target audience with compelling messaging and content.
 
Beginning in the first quarter of 2020, ATH will further improve its communications and fundraising efforts by improving its social network development and website traffic development, as well as email marketing and onboarding development.
 
These projects will enhance and strengthen our ability to engage with our supporters and followers on social media. More engagement will mean more support and a greater ability to fulfill our mission.
 
These projects will combine to give ATH state of the art technologies supporting our program, communications and fundraising efforts.
Other Documents
ATH Annual Report2018View
ATH Annual Report2017View
Organization Name After the Harvest
Address 406 W. 34th Street
Suite 816
Kansas City, MO 641117511
Primary Phone (816) 921-1903
CEO/Executive Director Lisa Ousley
Board Chair Ryan Chiaverini
Board Chair Company Affiliation Meritage Portfolio Management
Year of Incorporation 2014