Connecting for Good, Inc.
2006 N 3rd Street
Kansas City KS 66101
Denise Brown, from Juniper Gardens in KCK, got a job with UPS following her digital literacy training with instructor Richelle Phillips
Web and Phone Contact
Telephone (816) 5597077
Mission Statement
The mission of Connecting For Good is to provide digital literacy skills, computers, and internet access to low-income communities.
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Thomas Matthew Esselman
Board Chair Michael Levine
Board Chair Company Affiliation Susan G. Kommen Foundation
History and Background
Year of Incorporation 2011
Financial Summary
Revenue Expense Area Graph

Comparing revenue to expenses shows how the organizations finances fluctuate over time.

Source: IRS Form 990

 Breakdown
Net Gain/Loss:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.
Statements
Mission Statement The mission of Connecting For Good is to provide digital literacy skills, computers, and internet access to low-income communities.
Background Statement

Connecting for Good (CFG) was created in 2011 by Rick Deane and Michael Liimatta as a response to Google Fiber’s announcement to make Kansas City its first gigabit fiber city. Its objective was to provide internet connectivity for low income communities throughout the Kansas City area. 

Relying on Rick Deane’s knowledge of wireless mesh networks, CFG installed its first free Wi-Fi network in Rosedale Ridge, Kansas, in December, 2012, bringing internet services to nearly 400 residents. In 2013 CFG was able to partner with Kansas City Kansas (KCK) Housing Authority to bring internet service to Juniper Gardens, a public housing project. Having formed a volunteer board of directors, CFG, In July of 2013 moved to Troost Avenue, the racial and economic dividing line of Kansas City, Missouri. Moving to this location allowed CFG to expand its services to include computer refurbishing and digital literacy training in an open computer lab serving some of the most vulnerable of Kansas City’s urban core residents.

In May 2014 through its partnership with the KCK Housing Authority, CFG opened a second facility, the Northeast Wyandotte County Community Technology Center, at 2006 N 3rd Street in KCK. The center opened with 20 public computer workstations, with regularly scheduled digital literacy classes. nonprofits. In December, 2014, Connecting for Good became a founding member of the Kansas City Digital Inclusion Coalition, along with the Kansas City Public Library, Literacy KC, KC Digital Drive, and the City of KCMO and others. By this time, CFG had trained over 2000 urban core residents, and sold over 1000 affordable computer devices to needy families for as little as $50

With growing demand, CFG moved again in November of 2015, opening the Linwood Area Computer Center in the beautifully restored Linwood Area Ministry Place (LAMP), to serve residents east of the Troost Avenue divide. At this same time, Michael Liimatta left Connecting for Good to become the inaugural manager of HUD’s ConnectHome initiative in Washington DC. The board hired former Hallmark executive Tom Esselman as CEO in January, 2016. Under Esselman’s leadership, CFG has shifted its focus beyond Connectivity, Hardware, and Training, towards an outcomes-based approach. Funding has increased to support goals in Education, Employment, Economic Impact, and the Environment. With more classes and on the job training in more sites, including Community Learning Centers throughout Kansas City, CFG trained 7000 residents in 2016. In April, 2017, CFG hired a new Chief Programs Officer, Angela Underwood, who will lead the development and expansion of education and job training programs, as well as the formalization and expansion of a city-wide volunteer program.

Impact Statement

Accomplishments in 2016:

  • Opened the Linwood Area CommunityComputer Training Center at 3210 Michigan Avenue in KCMO, and began adding more class topics and remote training locations.  
  • Became the designated digital literacy training partner for HUD's Connect Home initiative, joining Google Fiber and The Surplus Exchange to provide free internet access, low-cost computers, and computer training at 6 Housing Authority sites in KCMO and three in KCK
  • At year end, 2016, CFG had served 7000 low-income individuals with computer skills training
  • At year end, 2016,CFG had sold 275 low-cost computers to low income families and non-profits who serve them
  • At year end, 2016, CFG had averaged 1500 low-income subscribers per month to its free mesh network internet service
  • At its first ever annual fundraiser, in December, 2016, CFG announced it new programming focus on the ecosystem of Digital Inclusion, balancing the 'roots' of technology (internet access and affordable devices) with the 'branches' of training (Life Skills, Education Skills, and Career Skills), with a commitment to outcomes measurement and workforce development.
 
Goals for 2017:
  • Build staffing and facilities capacity to fulfill commitment to outcomes measurement and workforce development
  • Develop credentials and certifications to align with all program services offered to low income clients, with a particular focus on educational achievement and workforce development
  • Expand commitment to 'collaboration and impact' through leadership roles locally (KC Coalition for Digital Inclusion) and nationally (National Digital Inclusion Alliance)
  • Develop a sustainable citywide volunteer program to support and grow all program services reach and impact
  • Diversify funding sources to include Government (City, County, State and Federal), as well as new corporate and individual donors, to supplement philanthropic foundation funders
Needs Statement

Major program funding needs:

  • Life Skills program: Curriculum development, professional development training, materials, and support costs— $80,000
  • Education Skills program: Curriculum development, professional development training, materials, and support costs — $50,000
  • Career Skills program: Curriculum development, professional development training, materials, and support costs — $70,000

Major facilities funding needs:

  • Completion of remodeling LAMP campus for Cisco workshop, Pearson Vue Testing Center, childcare space, Drive Up Computer donation service entry ($25,000)
  • Support costs for developing workforce development expansion to 'Digital Commons' concept on LAMP campus ($50,000)
  • $85,000 in costs for upgraded job training program for Juniper Gardens KCK Housing Authority residential facility (240 apartments) in 66101, the poorest zipcode in the state of Kansas, to upgrade internet access, computers, and training —this is in response to Google Fiber announcing that Juniper Gardens will no longer be included in its Connect Home gigabit fiber installation plans.

General operating funding needs:

  • $45,000 to support recruitment, background checks, training, and materials for volunteer program in support of expanded services

Service Categories
Urban & Community Economic Development
Educational Services
Job Training
Areas of Service
MO - Jackson County Urban Core
KS - Wyandotte County Urban Core

Over 80% of the individuals served are projected to have annual incomes below the federal poverty guideline, less than 80% of the KC median income level. Over 85% are projected to have no broadband internet access at home. Based on prior year’s data, they are expected to be predominantly African American and Latino. In addition, sixty-five percent are expected to be working age adults over the age of 21. Fifteen percent of the participants are projected to be retirees and older adults and 20% are expected to be school- age children. Over 75% of the participants are expected to live in the 64106, 64108, 64109, 64123-27 and zip codes. In the Kansas City, Kansas area of Northeast Wyandotte County, residents in the zip code of 66101, the lowest income zip code in the entire state of Kansas, are our target clients. For the 2017 grant year, 5000 individuals are targeted to be served.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Chair Statement

Connecting For Good (CFG) is in its fifth year, experiencing a shift in focus, balancing the technology roots of internet access and refurbished computers, with the publicly visible branches of skills development and economic impact.  As Kansas City heightens its momentum for workforce development, Connecting For Good is becoming one of the City’s regular partners.  After one year in my role as CEO, I am excited to see the formalization of our programming, and to help build the capacity and human capital to ensure its sustainability far into the future.

From its start in 2012, CFG became a darling in the newly emerging field of ‘digital inclusion’ because of its stance against the large technology companies who, up to that point, had largely ignored the poor parts of most cities in providing adequate broadband internet infrastructure. But in January of 2016, the month I started at CFG, technology companies, led by Google Fiber, began placing a bigger emphasis on developing affordable plans for low-income communities. What most of them needed was partnerships with community organizations and individuals with the compassion and trust of the residents, to educate and train the residents on the benefits of being online. That revelation became obvious to me in the first year of Google Fiber’s commitment to Connect Home—the federal HUD initiative to provide free internet to public housing residents—when many residents chose not to sign up for the completely free service due to their concerns about losing privacy and lack of trust in big brands and government. What matters to these residents is the open arms of trusted neighbors and friends—such as the staff and volunteers of Connecting For Good—who are willing to share learning to help make it clear why and how it matters to learn computer skills.

To be a trusted partner means that we commit ourselves to all parties engaged in digital inclusion work. This includes the corporations in the technology fields, as well as other corporate employers whose future workforce needs are linked to digital literacy. It includes the core institutions like schools and libraries, whose educational resources are enhanced by community partners who can help to exponentially expand the impact of their learning focus. It includes the broad network of social service providing agencies who collectively target the same vulnerable urban core families and individuals with an aim towards sustainable life improvement. And it includes an ever expanding focus on partnerships with our surrounding community of funding supporters, individuals and organizations with whom we share a perpetual passion for applying creative and innovative thinking and acting to address the stifling effects of poverty and blight in our cities’ urban core.

Our pledge moving forward is to focus on growth and diversity of our resource support stream, balancing our commitment to outcomes—improvements in Education, Employment, Economic Impact, and the Environment—with the care and compassion that fuels our vision of ‘a connected future for all’.

Programs
Description
  1. Free Internet for families in low income public and Section 8 housing. We use Wi-Fi mesh networks to spread connectivity to communities that otherwise would have very limited access.  As of April, 2017, we now have seven Wi-Fi Communities with over 1500 KC low income households on both sides of the state line.
  2. Pay-as-You-Go, $10 a month unlimited 4G Internet accsss - partnering with two national organizations, Mobile Beacon and EveryOneOn.org, we now offer this special service to low income families and nonprofit organizations.
  3. We offer a referral service to all the existing ISPs (Internet Service Providers) offering affordable internet programs for qualifying residents.  Often times confusing for families to navigate on their own, these offerings range from large corporate companies like Google Fiber, AT&T, and Comcast, to smaller targeted vendors like PCs for People
Program Budget $25,000.00
Category Community Development, General/Other Neighborhood Revitalization
Population Served At-Risk Populations, ,
Program is linked to organization's mssion Yes
Program Frequently Assessed Yes
Short-Term Success
In 2016 we provided service to an average of 1500 low income subscribers per month, across seven public housing and Section 8 subsidized residences.  
Long-Term Success
Access to the Internet brings with it a chance to apply for jobs online, connections with family and friends, access to virtual library shelves, information about medical and health issues, online education - GED completion and college courses - and a whole lot more.

These are resources with the potential to help an under resourced family move toward a healthier, happier and more secure future. Along with a broadband Internet connection, we are also including digital literacy training and distributing very inexpensive computers as part of this initiative.
 
Program Success Monitored By

For our wireless projects we have developed an initial survey and do follow ups at regular intervals to identify who is using the Internet and what they are doing online.

The wireless equipment we use can track which devices are connecting to the network, how often they connect and for how long they are using it. While not tracking individual user behavior, we can get a very accurate picture of the population that is using the networks we will set up.

Examples of Program Success
Residents of Juniper Gardens and other housing complexes with internet access provided by Connecting For Good regularly visit our computer labs for assistance with job searches and employment skills.  In 2016 five individuals attained new jobs or promotions as a direct result of the internet access and skills gained by the interaction with Connecting For Good
Description

One of the main contributors to the Digital Divide is a lack of access to affordable computer equipment. Many under resourced people who could connect to the Internet simply do not have the funds to purchase a PC.

Our staff, interns and volunteers take used desktops and laptops and create high quality, Internet ready PCs. As a participant in the Microsoft Registered Refurbisher Program, a software grants program allows us to provide these computers for as low as $50 to those who complete our free digital life skills classes and meet income qualifications.
Category Human Services, General/Other Household Goods Provision
Population Served At-Risk Populations, ,
Program is linked to organization's mssion Yes
Program Frequently Assessed Yes
Short-Term Success
In 2016, we partnered with The Surplus Exchange and Google Fiber to bring refurbished computers to public housing residents. Nearly 300 low-cost computers went to low income families and non-profit partners who serve them, including Operation Breakthrough, Amethyst Place, Reconciliation Services, and Literacy KC.
Long-Term Success

Our goal is to see that still useful computer equipment does not end up in the landfills but rather in the hands of people who really need them.

Long-term success for us is to see thousands of refurbished computers disseminated to adults, students and seniors through the Kansas City area who otherwise may not have been able to afford them

The ultimate goal is to assist them to become functioning citizens in a digital age, participating fully in all of the online activities that are essential for life in the twenty first century.

Program Success Monitored By

One of the main contributors to the Digital Divide is a lack of access to affordable computer equipment. Many under resourced people who could connect to the Internet simply do not have the funds to purchase a PC. Meanwhile, millions of still usable computers are sent out to be stripped down and their components recycled. The return on these activities is about $12.00 per unit.

As a participant in the Microsoft Registered Refurbisher Program, a software grants program allows us to provide these computers to those who complete our free digital life skills classes and meet income qualifications.

Every computer that comes out of our shop has a fully registered copy of the Windows 7 operating system. Microsoft Office is also available. We work with Macintosh and Linux computers, as well.

We follow a strict set of data destruction standards that ensure the confidentiality of the information on the donated computers we receive. What we can’t use, we send out to certified recycling organizations so nothing ends up in a landfill.

Examples of Program Success Sarah is a 23 year old single mother who was living on public assistance with two children when we first met her. Knowing she wasn’t providing for her children, she, too, experienced struggles with self-esteem and hopelessness. With minimal education, no marketable job skills or computer knowledge she was going nowhere fast. Over a period spanning several months, this young lady attended our basic classes and learned how to use a computer for the first time.

Because of her limited income, it took Sarah four months to pay for her $50 refurbished computer. She did it by taking on odd jobs to earn the money. During this time, we provided her with one-on-one assistance to learn how to apply for jobs and to develop a top notch resume. She also asked for our help with interviewing skills and choosing appropriate attire.

The good news is that she did get an office job and then a promotion within six months of being hired. Besides moving from public assistance to a career, Sarah also completed her GED and is taking college courses on line. All of this happened within the span of just nine months!

Description

By teaching everyday digital Life Skills, Education Skills, and Career Skills, Connecting for Good helps under-resourced families, senior citizens and the disabled to experience all of the possibilities that the World Wide Web has to offer

We are conducting regularly scheduled free classes and one-on-one and hands-on digital tutorials at our centers located at 3210 Michigan Avenue, Kansas City, Missouri and at 2006 N 3rd Street in Kansas City, Kansas.

We also offer tutoring and special classes on these topics at public housing facilities, churches, and community centers throughout Kansas City’s urban core.

Program Budget $195,000.00
Category Education, General/Other Computer Literacy
Population Served At-Risk Populations, ,
Program is linked to organization's mssion Yes
Program Frequently Assessed Yes
Short-Term Success

Education:  In 2016, we trained 7000 individuals from the urban core—by teaching over 53 different digital literacy topics in over 15 different Kansas City locations.  By the end of 2016, CFG had developed a new programming framework for digital literacy training, grouping courses into three categories:  Life Skills, Education Skills, and Career Skills. 

Long-Term Success

Our goal is to bring more users on to the Internet and to assist them to use it in a productive way. Long-term success for this program is seeing hundreds, if not thousands, of people who were previously not users at all become fully functioning digital citizens.

Success also includes seeing these people improve their lives because of the knowledge we impart, especially in gaining employment and education online.

Program Success Monitored By
Pre- and post-instruction surveys are being developed. We plan to do a follow-up survey at various intervals to learn how people who have been through the training have been using the Internet and how their lives have changed.
 
For the digital literacy classes we have to measures of success, a student create an email account and send a message with an attachment. A second measure is the ability to open a web browser and use a search engine to find information they seek. 
Examples of Program Success A 68 year old senior living in low income housing, once felt very alone. All of her family members had moved to Texas and California. Because of her limited budget, after completing the classes it took her 3 months to pay for a computer on our “lay away” plan . In the meantime, we taught her how to use Facebook and it’s chat feature. Before, she had very limited contact with her children and grandchildren and just a few pictures at holidays.

Using Facebook Annette now sets times to chat with her daughter and grandchildren. She is also able to see their photos in sports, school functions and family activities. She also does chat sessions with her son every week. This is so important for her because all she can afford is a cell phone with limited minutes.

Because she is now “digital,” she no longer feels unwanted, abandoned or old and unnecessary. Instead, by staying in touch with her family, she now feels loved, wanted, needed and has more fun. Getting a computer, learning how to use it and being a part of the world and connected changed Annette’s life dramatically.

Description

CFG currently operates two community technology centers, at 2006 N 3rd Street in Kansas City KS and 3210 Michigan Avenue in Kansas City MO. Located in two of the areas most under resourced neighborhoods, we offer a variety of programs to promote technology use and access, including regular free classes in computer and Internet use.

We are in the process of creating after school and summer programs for youth that will be conducted at these sites.

Category Education, General/Other Computer Literacy
Population Served At-Risk Populations, ,
Program is linked to organization's mssion Yes
Program Frequently Assessed Yes
Short-Term Success

  • Northstar Digital Literacy Certification—over 2000 students trained.
  • 400 kids trained through collaboration with Operation Breakthrough and digiSTORY of KC.
  • Developed curriculum and hired volunteer coordinator to begin classes in Summer of 2017.
  • Began Library-card training module in September of 2016; agreed to contract partnership with DuBois beginning March 2017.
  • A total of 19 Summer Jobs League interns were trained by CFG during Summer 2016, and one was hired full–time in November, 2016.
  • Provided training in all ConnectHome launch sites.
  • Averaged 1500 subscribers per month across 6 low-income housing sites.
  • Began promoting AT&T program to all clients in both CFG sites in Fall 2016.
  • Provided hotspots through PCs for People, and bullt new computer labs in 9 different sites across KCMO urban core landscape.
  • Over 50 Housing Authority residents trained across 5 Connect Home site launches and the two weeks following each.

Long-Term Success Our goal is to make sure those who live in Kansas City's under resourced urban core neighborhoods have access to the Internet, even if they do not yet have an in-home connection.
 
We are partnering with the Kansas City Public Library and the City of Kansas City to use the free Google Fiber Community Connections to create public access computing spaces in city-owned facilities.  
 
In the coming years, we will be focusing on outreach to the Northeast area of Kansas City on the Missouri side of the state line. Our research has found that a very high percentage of families there are living on the wrong side of the Digital Divide. 
Program Success Monitored By For the digital literacy classes we have to measures of success, a student create an email account and send a message with an attachment.  A second measure is the ability to open a web browser and use a search engine to find information they seek.
Examples of Program Success Liza is an unemployed 38 year old woman could neither read nor write. She how to use a computer and the Internet for the first time in our free classes. Outside of the sessions, we introduced her to educational word games. Using them, she taught herself how to read, write and spell. Because we made it fun for her, she came in every day for several months.

Once she started learning, Liza’s thirst for education was fueled, she couldn’t get enough. She felt she just had to have a computer that she could use at home. Like the other two women, because of her limited income, the only way she could purchase a refurbished PC was to take on odd jobs, like scrubbing floors. Before long, Liza was able to get a part time job and her self-esteem and confidence have blossomed.

CEO Comments

Connecting For Good (CFG) is in its fifth year, balancing the technology roots of internet access and refurbished computers, with the publicly visible branches of skills development and economic impact.  As Kansas City heightens its momentum for workforce development, CFG is becoming one of the City’s regular partners.  After one year in my role as CEO, I am excited to see the formalization of our programming, and to help build the capacity and human capital to ensure its sustainability far into the future.

Executive Director/CEO
Executive Director Thomas Matthew Esselman
Term Start Jan 2016
Compensation $50,001 - $75,000
Experience

Tom Esselman was named CEO of Connecting For Good in January, 2016, succeeding co-founder Michael Liimatta, who relocated to Washington DC to lead the national Connect Home initiative of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).  Tom has always been passionate about community engagement and leadership.  He came to Kansas City in the late 1980’s to work for Hallmark Cards, and eventually became an Innovation Director, responsible for creating Hallmark’s ‘Song Cards’, and Recordables.  After retiring from Hallmark in 2012 as a senior innovation executive, Tom was recruited to be the CEO for the Institute for the Ages, a startup nonprofit in Sarasota, Florida, where he built a successful record of leveraging healthcare technologies and digital inclusion for the senior market.  He gained experience bridging public and private funding as well as local and national efforts to drive the mission of a nonprofit entity.  Tom, and his wife Mary, returned to Kansas City in 2015 to be closer to their children—and two recent grandchildren. At Connecting For Good, Esselman is focused on developing robust programs focused on Education, Employment, Economic Impact, and the Environment—an outcomes approach to take Connecting For Good and the digital inclusion movement into a larger scale of clarity and impact.  The leaders who have worked with Tom describe him as a “creative connector’ with the ability “to see around corners” and inspire teams to ‘achieve the unthinkable’.  Tom earned his B.S. in Foreign Service from Georgetown University, and Masters in Business Management from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University.

Co-CEO/Executive Director
Term Start 0
Compensation Last Year
Senior Staff
Title Chief Technology Officer
Experience/Biography Rick started working in the community in the late ’80s. As a teenager, he helped with the mobile crime watch in his neighborhood. Later, he interned with the Jackson County Combat Commission. In 1998, he began working with the Kansas City Neighborhood Alliance where he led the efforts to develop a comprehensive website to serve community groups throughout the metro area. In 2006 Rick formed NPO Tech Support where he has continued to serve the technology needs of nonprofits in the Kansas City area. He is no stranger to Wi-Fi technology. He installed sixteen community networks for One Economy in its efforts to bridge the digital divide in Kansas City.
Title Chief Programs Officer
Experience/Biography

Angela is an innovative, data driven, Turnaround Leader, with a track record for exceeding targeted outcomes, leveraging community partnerships, as well as developing and customizing products and trainings. She has over 10 years of experience working with schools and families in the urban core of Kansas City, Detroit, and Nashville, with most of those years spent as a school principal, and personalized learning expert. She brings to Connecting For Good an energized approach to program development, data collection, analysis and reporting, volunteer management, and community development. Angela has a Masters degree from Western Governors University in Salt Lake City, and a Bachelors from William Jewell College in Liberty, Missouri

Staff
Paid Full-Time Staff 6
Paid Part-Time Staff 3
Volunteers 20
Paid Contractors 1
Retention Rate 100%
Staff Diversity (Ethnicity)
African American/Black 3
Caucasian 6
Staff Diversity (Gender)
Female 6
Male 3
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Plans & Policies
Organization Has a Fundraising Plan Yes
Organization Has a Strategic Plan Yes
Management Succession Plan No
Organization Policy and Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistleblower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Collaborations
  • KC Coalition for Digital Inclusion
  • Front Porch Alliance
  • Black Community Fund
  • Kauffman Foundation
  • Greater Kansas City Community Foundation
  • R.C. Kemper Family Foundation
  • D.W. Kemper Foundation
  • G.K. Baum Foundation
  • Sherman Family Foundation
  • Francis Family Foundation
  • Housing Authority of KCMO
  • City of KCMO
  • Unified Government of Wyandotte County
  • Full Employment Council of KCMO
  • Workforce Partners of KCK
  • Veterans Community Project
  • Troost Alliance
  • Linwood Corridor Coalition
  • Black Family Technology Awareness Association
  • Blue Hills Community Services
  • Kansas City Kansas Housing Authority
  • Kansas City Public Schools
  • Kansas City Public Library
  • KC Digital Drive
  • Literacy Kansas City
  • Operation Breakthrough
  • Reconciliation Services
  • The Surplus Exchange
  • Upper Room/Swope Renaissance
  • Urban Neighborhood Initiative
  • W. E. B. DuBois Learning Center
  • Linwood YMCA
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Life & Justice CampaignDiocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph2014
Sustainable Success StoriesMidAmerica Regional Council2014
Government Licenses
Is your organization licensed by the government? No
CEO Comments

To be a trusted partner means that we commit ourselves to all parties engaged in digital inclusion work. This includes the corporations in the technology fields, as well as other corporate employers whose future workforce needs are linked to digital literacy. It includes the core institutions like schools and libraries, whose educational resources are enhanced by community partners who can help to exponentially expand the impact of their learning focus. It includes the broad network of social service providing agencies who collectively target the same vulnerable urban core families and individuals with an aim towards sustainable life improvement. And it includes an ever expanding focus on partnerships with our surrounding community of funding supporters, individuals and organizations with whom we share a perpetual passion for applying creative and innovative thinking and acting to address the stifling effects of poverty and blight in our cities’ urban core.

Board Chair
Board Chair Michael Levine
Company Affiliation Susan G. Kommen Foundation
Term Jan 2014 to Jan 2018
Email michael@eat-kc.com
Board Co-Chair
Board Co-Chair Barbara Lach
Company Affiliation University of Missouri at Kansas City
Term Jan 2013 to Sept 2017
Email lachsmithb@umkc.org
Board Members
NameAffiliation
Chad Bly CPA, Spencer Reed Group, LLC
Amy Eastin
Leslie Gasser Don Bosco Center
Barbara Lach Asst to the Dean, UMKC School of Biological Sciences
Michael Levine Race & Events Manager, Susan B. Komen Run for the Cure
Ed Linnebur
Ralph Munyan Attorney in Private Practice
James New Retired, US Army
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 6
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 5
Female 3
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 90%
Written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 50%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 12
Standing Committees
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Operations
CEO Comments



Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01, 2017
Fiscal Year End Dec 31, 2017
Projected Revenue $550,000
Projected Expenses $494,000
IRS Letter of Exemption
Foundation Comments
  • FY 2015, 2014, 2013: Financial data reported using Form IRS 990.
  • Foundation/Corporation revenue line may include individual contributions.
Detailed Financials
 
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$233,828$117,543$87,829
Administration Expense$73,282$38,800$10,831
Fundraising Expense$16,409$7,397$8,654
Payments to Affiliates----$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.831.221.27
Program Expense/Total Expenses72%72%83%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue8%5%8%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$60,823$113,390$59,177
Current Assets$48,898$101,465$59,177
Long-Term Liabilities$0$0$0
Current Liabilities$5,051$1,489$1,080
Total Net Assets$55,772$111,901$58,097
Short-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities9.6868.1454.79
Long-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- --Kansas City Digital Inclusion Fund $35,000
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- --Kauffman Foundation $15,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- --Google Fiber $10,000
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Campaign Purpose To raise funds in support of the construction of the Digital Commons--an expansion of Connecting For Good's workforce development focus at the Linwood Area Ministry Place (LAMP) campus, 3210 Michigan Ave, KCMO 64109.  The initial campaign is to fund the Project Definition and Pre-Development phase
Goal $80,000.00
Dates Apr 2017 to Aug 2017
Amount Raised to Date $0.00 as of Apr 2017
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years Yes
Organization Comments

In 2017 Connecting For Good is undertaking a CPA review of 2015 and 2016 financial years, to be completed and published before the end of summer, 2017. The review is designed to prepare the organization to complete its first full audit no later than summer of 2018.

Organization Name Connecting for Good, Inc.
Address 2006 N 3rd Street
Kansas City, KS 66101
Primary Phone (816) 5597077
CEO/Executive Director Thomas Matthew Esselman
Board Chair Michael Levine
Board Chair Company Affiliation Susan G. Kommen Foundation
Year of Incorporation 2011