Hope Haven of Cass County
200 N. Oakland
Harrisonville MO 64701
Hope Haven Therapy Dogs Celebrate Survivors
Mission Statement

Mission:  Hope Haven of Cass County Domestic and Sexual Violence Program exists to provide safe shelter, concentrated supportive services, community resources, and education to survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault and with public outreach, seeks to reduce the tolerance and frequency of domestic and sexual violence in our community. 

Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Charlotte R Jennings MS
Board Chair Mrs. Jesica Junge
Board Chair Company Affiliation CPA, Franklin & Co
History and Background
Year of Incorporation 1992
Financial Summary
Revenue Expense Area Graph

Comparing revenue to expenses shows how the organizations finances fluctuate over time.

Source: IRS Form 990

 Breakdown
Net Gain/Loss:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.
Statements
Mission Statement

Mission:  Hope Haven of Cass County Domestic and Sexual Violence Program exists to provide safe shelter, concentrated supportive services, community resources, and education to survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault and with public outreach, seeks to reduce the tolerance and frequency of domestic and sexual violence in our community. 

Background Statement

Hope Haven of Cass County is the realization of a grass roots effort envisioned by the Harrisonville Business and Professional Women’s Club in 1991. Bolstered by community support, funds were raised, land donated and a shelter for battered women and children was built by the Cass County Career Center Building and Trades Program.

Since opening its doors in 1995, over 15,000 survivors of domestic violence received services. July 2009, Hope Haven became a dual program and began serving victims of sexual assault also. Since January 2010, staff and volunteers responded to 283 sexual assaults. Hope Haven, the sole provider of domestic and sexual violence services in Cass County, MO, continues to expand to meet the ever-increasing needs of survivors and their families. Today, Hope Haven, a “Dual” Domestic and Sexual Violence Program, provides shelter; 24/7 crisis intervention; support groups, counseling, outreach services, court, child, and hospital advocacy, sexual assault response, limited transitional housing, and referral services for survivors of sexual and domestic abuse.

Impact Statement
In 2016 - 2017, the organization's top accomplishments included:
  • The hiring and training of a new Director of Development and Public Relations.
  • The acquisition of a new building for administrative offices and outreach services.
  • Rapid Rehousing dollars awarded that allows clients to move immediate from shelter to housing with rent and utility assistance.
  • Opened a pet kennel on-site so that victims of domestic and sexual violence can bring their pets with them to shelter.
  • Annual gala collecting $79,000 in revenue.
Needs Statement

Funding to support:

  1. Purchase of approximately 20 acres of usable land for new campus project ($200,000).
  2. Funding to build and furnish a new campus with additional admin/services building, housing for women and men, housing for pets, and an increase in housing over all.  Project estimated costs at $1,000,000.
  3. Purchase van for client transportation estimated at $45,000.  Handicap accessible
  4. Furnishing replacement current shelter premises (20 twin mattresses @ $2000, 6 storage chests of drawers $1200; 2 heavy-duty washers/dryers $4000) and replace common-area living room furniture (2 leather couches/2 leather chairs) @ $4000
Service Categories
Family Violence Shelters and Services
Areas of Service
MO
MO - Cass County
KS
Hope Haven does not turn away any victim regardless of their location.  49% of clients were previously located in Jackson County and the areas surrounding the Greater Kansas City Metropolitan Area.  29% of clients were previously located in Cass County.  The remaining 22% are clients from other counties throughout Missouri and and other states throughout the US.
CEO/Executive Director/Board Chair Statement

The program meets the diverse needs of Cass County with experienced advocates providing essential Residential and needed Outreach services due to a full shelter . Drugs and alcohol abuse, coupled with issues of mental illness, stretch both human and financial resources. Families have compounded issues. In addition to economic and social barriers resulting from domestic or sexual violence, affordable housing is minimal, childcare is limited, and transportation non-existent.

Challenges are supporting Hope Haven financially to ensure sustaining effective efficient delivery of services to victims and compensating service deliverers performing in a high-stress arena reflecting the economic population that it serves. Funding for critical services is competitive.  Hope Haven continues to serve victims, implementing countywide protocols, a SANE Program to serve victims of sexual assault, expanding the volunteer program, and incorporating critical training for crisis intervention, safety, and Mental Health 1st Aid for advocates.

Even with these challenges, in 2016 Hope Haven provided 4020 safe bed-nights to 117 women, 2 men and 145 children. 360 women, men and children were turned away due to the shelter being full. Hope Haven also provided 184 hours of face to face crisis intervention, 1233 hours of case management, 342 hours of court advocacy, 708 hours of adult support group, 984 hours of children’s group, 152 hours of professional therapy, 152 hours of community education/training, and 38 community awareness activities. Advocates also answered 1625 crisis calls so that people received shelter, services, resources and information.

Programs
Description
Hope Haven provides a variety of services through the Shelter and Outreach   Programs that are grant supported with no charge to survivors. Services include emergency safe shelter and 24/7 hotline and crisis intervention. Case Management is resource referral and progress towards independence and safe community goals, as are Child, Law Enforcement and Hospital Advocacy. Court advocacy supports victims in the Crime Victim Compensation process and through the legal process, which can be difficult and frightening. Support groups held weekly for domestic violence adult and child survivors, parenting and sexual violence support groups held bi-monthly. Families served housing program based on funding; advocates offer education and training about issues of violence via programs about safety planning, prevention, dating violence and confidential assistance. Mental health, rape crisis and drug/alcohol abuse counseling provided, in collaboration with mental health professionals foster recovery.
Program Budget $417,000.00
Category Human Services, General/Other Services for Specific Populations
Population Served Victims, ,
Short-Term Success The reality of leaving abusive relationships is risk as the abuse often escalates when one decides to leave (i.e., if an abuser has threatened family members or has weapons at home the risk of harm or death is high). For victims leaving the abuse is often the start of added crises with minimal, if any, support or stability. The Shelter Program provides that support.

Changes in client behaviors range from subtle to obvious, from manic to despair, from aggression to apathy. Tasks like cooking, grooming or getting children to school may trigger memories that disable. Making decisions or facing a judge become overwhelming. For some isolation is a way of life and they lack skills for coping in a community living setting.

In Shelter, steps to recovery celebrated as clients seek help; redefine self-image and approaches to relationships; learn safety planning, community resources, and find jobs. Survival skills, once calculating become collaborative as clients also support each other.
Long-Term Success The ultimate goal is financial independence and re-integration into safe community as defined by the survivor, the expert in her/his life. Achieving such is a difficult and complex process compounded when children are also victims and moms must meet their needs. Overcoming abuse and pain, mental health issues, re-establishing credit, securing and maintaining employment, locating affordable housing and transportation coupled with meeting the educational and general well-being of one’s children meets greater success with individual supportive advocacy.
Program Success Monitored By Hope Haven employs a “Women Defined Advocacy” approach to programs supporting the premise that survivors are the experts on their own lives. Our collective role is to assist, support, educate, and refer based on self-defined needs related to goals.

Needs are assessed from data of pre and post anonymous surveys issued upon program entry, as receiving various program services including hospital, shelter, court and child advocacy, support groups, and throughout professional counseling experiences, and upon program exit.

The top five consistent need mentions remain program participants consistently rate as high needs are:
  1. Counseling for themselves and family
  2. Safety for self and children
  3. Support from other women
  4. Connections to others for help with financial, daycare, education and legal issues, and
  5. Finding a job
Compiled data evaluated monthly enables assessing gaps in service, success towards realizing individual goals, and tracking effectiveness of programs, services, and service providers.
Examples of Program Success During 2016, Hope Haven answered 1625 crisis hotline calls, provided shelter and case management for 264 residents that totals 4020 bed nights, provided 342 hours of court advocacy, and provided 38 community awareness activities.
Description
Hope Haven, a “dual” domestic and sexual violence program, collaborates with the Metropolitan Organization to Counter Sexual Assault (MOCSA) in bringing sexual assault services to Cass County. Since January 1, 2010 through October 2016, Hope Haven advocates have provided 347 sexual assault hospital responses with 58% or 201 seeking follow-up services including shelter, counseling, and court advocacy. Advocates have responded to 440 sexual assault crisis hotline calls in 2016 involving sexual assault specifically or domestic and sexual violence.  All Hope Haven staff have been trained as MOCSA volunteers and we respond to 3 local hospitals for any sexual assault activations.  Victim are then provided information about Hope Haven services including shelter, counseling, groups, outreach services, case management, and court advocacy.  SA volunteers are truly the backbone of the sexual assault response program. Current 2016 MOUs remain in place with MOCSA, Cass County Sheriff and Prosecutor’s offices; COVERSA, and Pathways for sexual assault services.
Program Budget $41,813.00
Category Human Services, General/Other Services for Specific Populations
Population Served Victims, ,
Short-Term Success Evident change in clients is the drive to move from victim to survivor and return to whatever normalcy is for them. Because sexual victimization is about one person choosing to exert power and control over another person, victims of sexual assault have had their power taken away. Changes in condition and attitude are seen as victims learn to direct their own healing process; they recover power by having the opportunity to decide what works best for them.

Individuals’ senses of self-worth also change as feelings, value as a person, and courage are validated. They ask if what they’re feeling is normal; are they going crazy, why they cry, or will the fear of everything and everyone go away?” As they hear, that the thoughts/feelings are normal, they are not crazy, their concerns/fears are real they begin to talk and gain ground. Believing that what was done to them wasn’t their fault, they begin to trust, feel more comfortable being alone, and they begin a long painful road to recovery.
Long-Term Success That with advocacy, crisis intervention, counseling, resources, referrals, and support clients’ recoveries from victimization enables them to assume living life or a state of normalcy as mentally healthy and free of trauma as they were prior to victimization.
Program Success Monitored By

The primary tool used to measure success is client feedback on question “Did having an advocate present help you?”

“Yes” responses of 32 calls 2010: 27 or 84%
“Yes” of 43 calls 2011: 36 or 83%

"Yes" of 66 calls 2012: 58 or 87%.
"Yes" of 64 calls 2013: 54 or 84%.
"Yes" of 60 calls 2014: 51 or 85%.
"Yes" of 53 calls 2015: 44 or 83%.
"Yes" of 29 calls Oct 2016 (YTD): 26 or 90%.

Measures that are more subjective include referring other victims to Hope Haven, observation, talking with SA survivors as they call to talk or if they come into shelter for safety. Clients and their family members call to say thanks, seek crisis support, and often to volunteer -- offers we appreciate but tactfully hold on until the individual and family are further along in recovery.

Examples of Program Success
Traumas of sexual assaults with certain re-victimization of those seeking services intensify as victims present at hospitals and report to authorities yet the courage, strength, and graciousness of victims is awe-inspiring.
  • X male raped, left exposed presented at hospital for injuries. Police response phone, X to come to station & report as unbelieving of story due to felon past, denied advocacy. X chose police report then attempted suicide, result in-house psychiatric care. X apologized for trouble he caused HH
  • Y female raped, threatened with death went thru SANE and because reported evidence tied accused, former police officer, to 2 murders. Y safe, suffers PTSS, continues working at onset of prosecution.
  • Z raped by estranged spouse, children present. Z and accused both “authorities”. He’s believed most credible, she seeks solace for kids.
  • YY female teen – SANE indicative of trauma, accused HS sports “stars”, victim un-believed attire and alcohol consumption questioned.
Description

Current provisions of Child Program include:

  • Weekly/as requested provided case management with moms for an average of 234 children annually
  • Provide age-appropriate safety planning; healthy coping and problem solving
  • Provide 45 Children’s DV/SV support groups with 10 to 12 children attending weekly and 24 Parenting Support groups
  • Coordination of child counseling; school transportation services; and outside child care An average of 2 family oriented group activities (birthday, holiday, and educationally oriented) provided annually
  • Child Advocate provides limited childcare during counseling, job searches; mothers case management or other scheduled resource meetings/job trainings or medical appointments
  • Provided 9 In-school & community programs that include safety planning, dating/sexual violence, and Domestic Violence and Children
  • Court Advocacy and support for average of 8 children annually
Program Budget $58,000.00
Category Human Services, General/Other Child Care
Population Served Families, ,
Short-Term Success
Short-term success is sometimes difficult to measure as children of all ages are in and out of the program at different times.  Successes are measured however based on activities and education provided consistently by Advocates. Measures of successes measured include:
  • 100% of non-infant children participate in age-appropriate safety planning/education ranging from good touch/bad touch to knowing their name and mom's full name;  fire safety/fire drills; safety signs; and being able to identify a person (can be family member or friend) they feel safe talking to and being with
  • Participating in bi-monthly organized art activities
  • Family participation in one family-oriented activity (story day; movie; play-yard game; petting zoo; picnic; etc.) monthly
  • Child Advocate, Volunteers, and staff are knowledgeable and current about community child related services from professional counseling and child therapy to school resource and library activities   
Long-Term Success

Development and planned expansion of Children's Advocacy Program entails:

  • Longer term accredited child care for working mothers in separate child facilities either on premises or contracted
  • Financial support child care
  • Accommodate court ordered supervised visitation off premises
  • Accommodate individual and group counseling for children
Program Success Monitored By For parenting support groups and children's groups success is monitored by survey feedback, specifically feedback related to finding groups beneficial to the healing process; our ability to meet requests for topics; repeat participation in groups; and requests for additional services.
Examples of Program Success Approximately 1/3 of Outreach families return weekly for up to one year after leaving shelter on a consistent basis to attend group so their children remain engaged in services.  
Description

Hope Haven’s STEPSS Program (introduced 2013), gained momentum and changed focus based on client participant need and request. While still available to serve outreach clients that choose to remain connected to supportive services, the revamped program is STEPSS (Supportive Transitions Ensure Planned Safe Survival) and is designed and supported by Outreach clients for addressing issues "beyond shelter" includes advanced support that speaks to issues clients experience when surviving after survival. Topics, safety planning, and speakers are scheduled at participants’ request. Why? Because we learned that new outreach clients, especially those who haven’t required shelter still need the “basics” of initial DV/SV support groups while those that have moved on, or graduated from shelter, face different and sometimes unique supportive needs related to surviving vs. moving from victim to survivor.

Category Human Services, General/Other Emergency Assistance
Population Served Victims, ,
Short-Term Success Short-term success was re-evaluated for the STEPSS program with feedback from participants. What we learned was that there is a point in time where survivors of domestic violence that have essentially graduated from shelter for a year or more were in the mode of surviving – providing for themselves and their families financially yet with a need and desire to move beyond “simply surviving” their words. Near term achievements became:
    • By the end of their (30, 45, 60 or longer) stay in shelter 82% of individuals leaving will be employed, in job training, &/or moving into habitable and affordable housing.
    • 95% of women re-assessed components of safety planning for themselves and their children encompassing multiple situations from daycare/school situations to workplace safety entailed vigilance; re-visiting; and establishment of different boundaries.
    • 70% of STEPSS Outreach women re-assessed goals related to continuing education; job skill needs; and parenting. Their requests were for enhanced/expanded Life Skills programs (Saving/investing vs. Budgeting; job advancement vs. job search; incorporating healthy lifestyles vs. cooking/healthy eating; basic car repair/servicing; household improvement, etc.)
Long-Term Success Long-term success is women leaving abusive situations will be financially independent and live violence free consistently making positive choices regarding education, employment, and family. 
Program Success Monitored By

Program success has been monitored by participant feedback and participation in activities beyond expectation. Examples include:

 

  • Requests and participation in additional support groups considered advanced or senior groups where guest speakers (successful survivors) facilitate discussions addressing issues/questions ranging from overcoming debt to managing/eliminating triggers.
  • “Seniors” participate in focus groups and opportunities to share their stories (i.e., awareness presentations, panel discussions for training and in-school, story-boarding activities/presentations)
  • Providing ideas and assistance for overall program and best practices improvement for shelter.

 

Examples of Program Success
Convincing information that we receive reflective of success comes from clients themselves.  They trust us enough to share lives/stories, they let us to sit with them, hug and cry with them. Powerful calls, letters sharing, "I am employed - YEAH"!; "I'm with my kids/family"; "As of today I have held a lease for a year, I am free".;  
  • 10 yr. old boy writing story -- "Day 1 My New Life" ending it with, "This place is full of people just like us and is free.  That's our new life.  See you tomorrow."
  • A woman in shelter 5x's spoke at a community meeting. Shared what it meant to have people to turn to. Ended her talk with "Who knew so much bad could turn out with so much good".
  • A woman sending drawing of shelter's floor plan titled "My Safe Place". writing, "While I was in a jail we were asked to draw our safe place. I've been at HH 4x's before I finally got away. I know I can always count on HH.  This is MY ultimate Safe Place!"
  • recommendations to program because "they can help" is success. 
CEO Comments
Challenges facing Hope Haven are the need to do more with less in terms of funding, facilities and human resources yet uniqueness’s are:
  • Being sole provider of domestic/sexual violence services for Cass County
  • Serving the 2nd fastest growing county in the Metro Area (2010 Census) with 2 distinct populations – a suburban populace north comprising about 46% of the population and rural populace in the southern half of the county
  • Serving 11 municipalities with independent police forces and the Sheriff’s Department
  • Serving a county that lacks community resources critical to the population served including public transportation; services for youth and homeless; career/employment centers; bilingual services in human services organizations; in-house psychiatric or counseling services for victims of sexual violence
Meeting ever-expanding needs remains a challenge met short-term by:
  • Designating 2 rooms, 6 beds for single women increasing shelter capacity by 23%. Hope Haven facilities have 3 suites (6 bedrooms, 3-4 beds per) with adjoining bathrooms; combined kitchen, dining and living room area; laundry facilities, playroom, group meeting room, reception and 1 office area.
  • Converting a storage and the group area to serve dual purposes ensuring confidential client meetings, counseling, Court Advocacy and Case Management. Future goals are expanding capacity through renovation, adding a modular unit and expanding with another shelter in the north half of the county.
  • Expanded Outreach for those not needing/turned away due to capacity. Outreach clients have access to all existing services including Court and Child Advocacy, Case Management, Referral, emergency financial, transportation, mental health, and housing related services. The Outreach Program operates from Hope Haven’s existing location yet resident security and confidentiality are maintained by serving Outreach clients via separate entrance.

With increased need for services countywide, an added challenge is human resources bench strength. Hope Haven employees are dedicated and long-term yet face challenges not realized even 5 years ago. The proliferation of drug/alcohol abuse, mental illnesses, and aggressive behaviors influence client, staff and volunteer interactions yet while we meet these challenges with training, procedures and resource development, the sometimes volatility of community living and crisis intervention jeopardizes safety. Programs are short-staffed, staff underpaid and overworked even with fully paid health insurance and PTO for full time employees.

Executive Director/CEO
Executive Director Ms. Charlotte R Jennings MS
Term Start May 2015
Compensation $0 - $50,000
Experience
Charlotte Jennings received her Bachelor of Arts in the fields of psychology and criminology at Drury College (Springfield, MO) and followed this with a Masters of Science in Criminology and Criminal Justice at Florida State University (Tallahassee, FL).
 
Ms. Jennings has worked in the human services field through employment with law enforcement agencies, State of Missouri Children's Division, Missouri State University and others.  She has extensive knowledge in the fields of social work, criminal justice, and several forms of mediation.
 
Ms. Jennings joined Hope Haven in May 2015 as Executive Director.
Co-CEO/Executive Director
Term Start 0
Compensation Last Year
Former CEOs
NameTerm
Ms. Joan Pierce Aug 2002 - Sept 2010
Ms. Linda Tessar Apr 2008 - Apr 2015
Senior Staff
Title Program Director
Experience/Biography Ms. Neumann has her BA in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Kansas.  She has volunteered and worked for several agencies that advocate for victims of crime.  She has promoted through multiple positions with Hope Haven as her experience increases, from shelter support advocate, court advocate, and case manager to Program Director.
Staff
Paid Full-Time Staff 11
Paid Part-Time Staff 2
Volunteers 20
Paid Contractors 0
Retention Rate 56%
Staff Diversity (Ethnicity)
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 11
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Staff Diversity (Gender)
Female 11
Male 2
Not Specified 0
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Plans & Policies
Organization Has a Fundraising Plan Yes
Organization Has a Strategic Plan Yes
Management Succession Plan Yes
Organization Policy and Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistleblower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Collaborations
    • Cass County Prosecutor's Office
    • Metropolitan Organization to Counter Sexual Assault (MOCSA)
    • Belton Regional Medical Center and Cass Regional Medical Centers
    • Compass Health Services
    • Cass County Domestic Violence Task Force includes Cass County law enforcement officers, Prosecutors, SANE nurses, and sexual assault and domestic violence advocates. The coalition provides training to law enforcement and prosecutors and establishes countywide protocols for sexual and domestic violence calls for all Cass County Law Enforcement agencies. The Coalition along with Hope Haven and MOCSA established the first countywide sexual assault protocol in 2010. Hope Haven provides training for participating law enforcement entities about domestic and sexual violence.
    • West Central MO Community Action Agency
    • Belton Police Department
    • Legal Aid of Western Missouri (LAWMO)
    • Cass County Sheriff’s Academy
    • Cass Regional Medical Center
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Alliance of Greater Kansas City United Ways Agency Certification2005
National Coalition Against Domestic Violence2003
United Way Member Agency2005
Missouri Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence - Member2000
Government Licenses
Is your organization licensed by the government? No
CEO Comments

Challenges facing Hope Haven are the need to do more with less in terms of funding, facilities and human resources yet uniqueness’s are:

  • Being sole provider of domestic/sexual violence services for Cass County
  • Serving the 2nd fastest growing county in the Metro Area (2010 Census) with 2 distinct populations – a suburban populace north comprising about 46% of the population and rural populace in the southern half of the county
  • Serving 11 municipalities with independent police forces and the Sheriff’s Department
  • Serving a county that lacks community resources critical to the population served including transportation; services for youth and homeless; career/employment centers; bilingual services; counseling services for victims of sexual violence
Meeting ever-expanding needs remains a challenge met short-term by: 
  • Expanded Outreach for those not needing/turned away due to capacity. Outreach clients have access to all existing services including Court and Child Advocacy, Case Management, Referral, emergency financial, transportation, mental health, and housing related services. The Outreach Program operates from Hope Haven’s existing location yet resident security and confidentiality are maintained by serving Outreach clients via separate entrance. 
With increased need for services countywide, an added challenge is human resources strength. Employees are dedicated and long-term yet face challenges not realized even 5 years ago. The proliferation of drug/alcohol abuse, mental illnesses, and aggressive behaviors influence client, staff/volunteer interactions yet while we meet these challenges with training, procedures and resource development, the sometimes volatility of community living and crisis intervention jeopardizes safety. Programs are short-staffed, staff underpaid and overworked even with fully paid health insurance and PTO for full time employees.
Board Chair
Board Chair Mrs. Jesica Junge
Company Affiliation CPA, Franklin & Co
Term Jan 2017 to Dec 2018
Email jesica@judyfranklincpa.com
Board Co-Chair
Board Co-Chair Mr. Steve Deere
Company Affiliation R-G Federal Credit Union
Term Jan 2017 to Dec 2018
Email steve@rgfcu.com
Board Members
NameAffiliation
Mr. Tom Alber Garden City Police Chief
Mrs. Ashley Beard-Fosnow UMKC Foundation
Mr. Steve Deere Community Volunteer
Mr. Fred Delibero CEO Summit Custom Homes
Mrs. Susie Duane Summit Homes Realitor
Mr. Randy Grimm Calvary Bible College
Mrs. Jesica Junge Accountant at Franklin & Co
Ms. Lynn Laffoon Attorney
Mrs. Meryl Lange Circuit/Municipal Judge
Mrs. Jane Redmond Edward Jones
Ms. Amy Schmoll Quality Control Coordinator, Black & Veatch Engineering
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 10
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 4
Female 7
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 78%
Written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 0%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 12
Standing Committees
Executive
Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
Finance
Personnel
Nominating
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Program / Program Planning
Building
Advisory Board Members
NameAffiliation
Mr. Whit Kirk Retired
Ms. Karen Meador Belton Licensing Bureau
CEO Comments

Hope Haven views challenges as “opportunities in progress” with the realization that opportunities may lead to new challenges -- a good thing!  It is a challenge to provide individualized services, from meeting basic needs to photographing injuries, yet each provision an opportunity to encourage, educate, and empower.  Being clear, implementing best practices related to advocacy, minimizes cookie-cutter approaches to services while ensuring focus is on the individual program participant.  

It is a challenge to work with young children whose behaviors toward other children are reflective of their environment and sometimes indicative of child abuse.  In the shelter’s community living environment situations, compounded by diverse parenting skills and the desire to protect ones children, provide opportunities that range from securing professional therapy or diffusing parental aggression to convincing a parent to hotline herself for intervention, support and the safety of her children. 

It is a challenge to be non-discriminatory when prejudices are ingrained.   Fostering understanding and tolerance the opportunity – be it in actions, training, and clarity of expectation.  

It is a challenge yet a privilege, to be the only provider of domestic and sexual violence services and safe shelter in Cass County.   Our opportunities remain in community outreach, education, and strong collaborations with community partners. 

Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01, 2017
Fiscal Year End Dec 31, 2017
Projected Revenue $601,791
Projected Expenses $550,952
IRS Letter of Exemption
Foundation Comments
  • FY 2015, 2014, 2013: Financial data reported using IRS Form 990.
  • Foundations/corporate revenue line item may include contributions from individuals.
Detailed Financials
 
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$266,672$201,775$90,880
Government Contributions$434,138$344,109$343,684
Federal----$0
State----$0
Local----$0
Unspecified$434,138$344,109$343,684
Individual Contributions----$52,445
$0$0$0
$0$0$0
Investment Income, Net of Losses($138)$29$1,500
Membership Dues$0$0$0
Special Events$0$0$0
Revenue In-Kind$0$0$0
Other$148$280$24,174
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$429,832$403,032$400,545
Administration Expense$73,454$61,787$26,944
Fundraising Expense$12,497$3,646$862
Payments to Affiliates----$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.361.171.20
Program Expense/Total Expenses83%86%94%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue2%1%0%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$778,386$595,793$516,996
Current Assets$649,006$506,363$423,490
Long-Term Liabilities$0$2,581$0
Current Liabilities$8,729$8,594$10,106
Total Net Assets$769,657$584,618$506,890
Short-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities74.3558.9241.90
Long-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- --Missouri Dept. of Social Services Domestic Violence Shelter and Related Services $130,778
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- --Dept. of Public Safety-Victims of Crime Act Grant $79,302
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- --Healthcare Foundation of Greater Kansas City-Applicant Defined Grant $63,671
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Campaign Purpose To purchase land for a new campus to increase housing and service space.
Goal $1,000,000.00
Dates Aug 2016 to Dec 2019
Amount Raised to Date $360,000.00 as of Oct 2017
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years Yes
Organization Comments

Hope Haven views challenges as “opportunities in progress” with the realization that opportunities may lead to new challenges -- a good thing!  It is a challenge to provide individualized services, from meeting basic needs to photographing injuries, yet each provision an opportunity to encourage, educate, and empower.  Being clear, implementing best practices related to advocacy, minimizes cookie-cutter approaches to services while ensuring focus is on the individual program participant.  

It is a challenge to work with young children whose behaviors toward other children are reflective of their environment and sometimes indicative of child abuse.  In the shelter’s community living environment situations, compounded by diverse parenting skills and the desire to protect ones children, provide opportunities that range from securing professional therapy or diffusing parental aggression to convincing a parent to hotline herself for intervention, support and the safety of her children. 

It is a challenge to be non-discriminatory when prejudices are ingrained.   Fostering understanding and tolerance the opportunity – be it in actions, training, and clarity of expectation.  

It is a challenge yet a privilege, to be the only provider of domestic and sexual violence services and safe shelter in Cass County.   Our opportunities remain in community outreach, education, and strong collaborations with community partners. 

Organization Name Hope Haven of Cass County
Address 200 N. Oakland
Harrisonville, MO 64701
Primary Phone (816) 380-2833
Contact Email hopehavened@gmail.com
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Charlotte R Jennings MS
Board Chair Mrs. Jesica Junge
Board Chair Company Affiliation CPA, Franklin & Co
Year of Incorporation 1992