NorthCare Hospice & Palliative Care
NorthCare Hospice House
2800 Clay Edwards Drive, 2nd Floor
North Kansas City MO 64116
Web and Phone Contact
Telephone (816) 6915119
Mission Statement

To offer excellence in care, comfort and support to those experiencing a life limiting illness so they may embrace life until death with dignity.

 

Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms Pam Barrett
Board Chair Ms. Elaine McIntosh
Board Chair Company Affiliation Kansas City Hospice & Palliative Care
History and Background
Year of Incorporation 2005
Former Names
Barr Hospice
Financial Summary
Revenue Expense Area Graph

Comparing revenue to expenses shows how the organizations finances fluctuate over time.

Source: IRS Form 990

 Breakdown
Net Gain/Loss:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.
Statements
Mission Statement

To offer excellence in care, comfort and support to those experiencing a life limiting illness so they may embrace life until death with dignity.

 

Background Statement

NorthCare Hospice & Palliative Care (NCH) was established in 1995 and in 1998 became affiliated with North Kansas City Hospital. In July 2015, North Kansas City Hospital invited Kansas City Hospice & Palliative Care (KCH&PC) to bring NorthCare Hospice under its umbrella.  The hospital recognized KCH&PC as the most desirable community partner for its depth and breadth of expertise and programs. Since its earliest beginnings NorthCare Hospice has been sensitive to special needs of patients and families.

  1. 2002 - introduced a program for patients with cardiac disease to improve care and reduce unnecessary ER visits or hospitalizations.
  2. 2004 - established a program to address the particular needs of patients with Amytrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS).
  3. 2010 - opened NorthCare Hospice House, a 16-bed homelike in-patient hospice facility within North Kansas City Hospital. It is the only facility of its kind in the Northland and serves patients with medical needs too complex to manage at home.
  4. 2012 - created a program to address the distinctive needs of patients with Advanced Lung Disease.
  5. 2015 - NorthCare Hospice became a subsidiary of Kansas City Hospice & Palliative Care.
Impact Statement

2015 Accomplishments:

 
  1. NorthCare Hospice (NCH) became a subsidiary of Kansas City Hospice & Palliative Care in July. As a subsidiary NCH will continue to serve over 1,000 patients a year in the Northland in their homes and at NorthCare Hospice House, located within North Kansas City Hospital.
  2. Pet Peace of Mind Program introduced to help provide pet care for hospice patients. Many patients want to keep their pets near them, but they sometimes become too ill to attend to the animals’ needs. PPOM trains volunteers to help patients with their pet care needs and it finds homes for pets after a patient dies.
  3. Grew volunteer program hours significantly. 

 

Goals for 2016:
 
  1. Make major refinements to the Electronic Medical Record system.
  2. Expand recognition and appreciation program to patients who are Veterans.
  3. Continue to provide in-home hospice and palliative care services to patients in the Northland and at NorthCare Hospice House.

 

 

Needs Statement
  1. $289,000 – Subsidized Services –Costs associated with subsidized care include medical and nursing  services, medications, grief support, massage therapy and patient emergency funds to help cover expenses such as one-time utility bills, a car repair so that a patient can get to medical appointments, or other emergency needs.
  2. Volunteer Recruitment/Expansion – More volunteers are needed to provide reception and hospitality, respite and companionship and to staff the No One Dies Alone and We Honor Veterans Programs.

 

Service Categories
Hospice
Areas of Service
MO - Clay County
MO - Platte County
MO - Ray County
MO - Jackson County
MO - Cass County
MO - Clinton
CEO/Executive Director/Board Chair Statement

Having learned from long ago personal experience with the death of my 58-year old father from cancer, I understood the impact and dynamics of terminal illness.   Although my father received the standard of care at the time in 1975, he suffered a great deal.  He experienced a great deal of pain.  He and my mother were never prepared for what was ahead and she struggled mightily to care for him at home.  My sisters and I were completely at a loss of how to help, how to grieve, and how to live through this experience.  My experience was certainly not unique, but it was profound to me.

When I first learned of the hospice movement in the United States, I knew instantly that this was a much needed change for our health care system.  It has been my privilege to work toward assuring that no one ever needs to go through this experience without help, guidance, expertise and compassion, which is what the hospice movement is all about.
 
Challenges are many
  • Finding the right staff is central to success.  Not everyone wants to work with people who are not going to get better.  There are those who do find it a deep calling, but there are not many of them.
  • Financial pressures are enormous.  Hospice is a small but extraordinarily important part of the health care system.  Hospice is paid a flat rate by the payers, regardless of what it actually costs to care for the patient.  And it often costs more to provide excellent care than is paid by Medicare and others.
  • Regulatory requirements are perpetually changing and keeping up with each new requirement is resource and time intensive. 



Programs
Description

Hospice care teams consisting of nurses, social workers, chaplains, therapists, home health aides and volunteers provide care for the patient and support for the family. The Director of Medical Programs coordinates the plan of care with the family physician. Services are provided where the patient resides. 

Category Health Care, General/Other Hospice Care
Population Served Adults, ,
Short-Term Success

Short term success of hospice care: patients receive the right amount of help to manage pain;  patients are able to maintain a sense of well-being as they approach the end of life; and family members receive the right amount of emotional and spiritual support they need as they help their loved ones make this journey. Success is indicated when 90% or more of NorthCare Hospice & Palliative Care families state that:

  1. The patient was treated with dignity and respect
  2. The patient got as much help with pain as was needed. 
  3. The care giver received the right amount of emotional support.
  4. The caregiver(s) received the right amount of spiritual support.
Long-Term Success

For hospice patients, long term successes are achieved when: no one dies in pain, and patients receive all of the emotional and spiritual support they need to make the journey at the end of life as easy as possible; family members are not overburdened when serving as home caregivers for their loved ones. Instead they are able to participate in the circle of care at whatever level they feel is best; and the patient and family members express and manage grief appropriately, so that the path to healing can begin.

Program Success Monitored By

Nurses and social workers monitor the patient's psychological and emotional well-being on each visit to the home. The effectiveness of pain management, the management of anxiety and stress and whether or not loved ones receive the right amount of support following a patient's death are measured by DEYTA LLC, the largest hospice benchmark data base in the U.S, which evaluates family satisfaction and compares those outcomes to those of over 1,700 hospices nationwide. Any concerns identified are addressed in regular meetings of the Quality Assessment and Improvement Committee, which sets objectives and establishes methods of improving and measuring program outcomes.

Examples of Program Success

 In the most recent 2015 DEYTA Family Satisfaction Survey: 

  1. 96.9% of families stated the patient was always treated with dignity and respect.
  2. 96.3% of families stated that the family received the right amount of help with pain.
  3. 93.7% of families stated that they received the right amount of emotional support.
  4. 96.8% of families surveyed stated that they received the right amount of spiritual support.
 




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Description

Hospice care is usually provided in the familiar surroundings of home. But sometimes the need for care gets more complicated than can be provided at home.  In August, 2010,  NorthCare Hospice opened the NorthCare Hospice House, a 16-bed facility located within North Kansas City Hospital. Created to replicate a homelike-environment, NCH patients receive care for pain and symptom management.  Family members and friends of all ages, including family pets, can visit around the clock. A dedicated team of medical directors, nurses, hospice techs, social workers, chaplains and volunteers provide care to patients as well as support to the family during this challenging time.

In addition to excellent care NorthCare Hospice House provides comfortable spaces for loved ones to gather, quiet garden areas, children's play areas, spaces for meditation and prayer, refreshments for families, a kitchen, dining room and laundry facilities, and a caring staff. 


Category Health Care, General/Other Hospice Care
Population Served Adults, ,
Short-Term Success

Short-term success of hospice care: patients receive the right amount of help with pain and are able to maintain a sense of well-being as they approach the end of life; patients are treated with dignity and respect; and family members receive the right amount of emotional and spiritual support they need as they help their loved ones make this journey. Success is indicated when 90% or more of NorthCare Hospice & Palliative Care families state that:

  1. The patient was treated with dignity and respect.
  2. The patient received the right amount of medicine to manage  pain.
  3.  Caregivers received the right amount of emotional support.
  4. Caregivers received the right amount of spiritual support.
Long-Term Success

For hospice patients long term successes are achieved when: no one dies in pain, and patients receive all of the emotional and spiritual support they need to make the journey at the end of life as easy as possible; family members are not overburdened as caregivers.  Instead they are able to participate in the circle of care at whatever level they feel is best; and the patient and family members express and manage grief appropriately, so that the path to healing can begin.


Program Success Monitored By

Nurses and other professionals monitor the patient's psychological and emotional well-being. The management of anxiety and stress and whether or not loved ones receive the right amount of emotional and spiritual support are measured by DEYTA LLC, the largest hospice benchmark data base in the U.S., which evaluates family satisfaction and compares those outcomes to those of over 1,700 hospices nationwide. Any concerns identified are addressed at regular meetings of the Quality and Assurance and Improvement Committee, which sets objectives and establishes methods of improving and measuring program outcomes.

Examples of Program Success

In the most recent 2015 DEYTA Family Satisfaction Survey:

  • Families stated that 96.3% of patients received the right amount of help with pain.
  • 96.9%% of families stated that the patient was always treated with dignity and respect. 
  • 93.7% of families stated that they received the right amount of emotional support.
  • 96.8% of families surveyed stated that they received the right amount of spiritual support.
Description
Volunteers help provide a variety of services that enrich families’ lives. For example:
  1. Respite care - the most prevalent request from families caring for patients in the home is for respite services.  Trained volunteers go into patients' home to provide support so that caregivers can have a break for a few hours to go grocery shopping, run errands and take care of personal business.
  2. Pet Peace of Mind - pet assistance so that patients can maintain their pet in their home. Volunteers walk dogs, transport pets to and from veterinarian and grooming appointments, deliver pet supplies and support the patient in making long-term placement decisions regarding their pet.
  3. We Honor Veterans - provides recognition and appreciation to Veterans. Volunteers who have served in the military are available to visit with patients who are Veterans.
  4. Lifetime Legacy - Trained volunteers can come to the patients' residence or NorthCare Hospic House and video a conversation between the patient and family where history is shared and stories are told. Volunteers use professional equipment and the family is provided with 2 DVDs.
Category Health Care, General/Other Hospice Care
Population Served Adults, ,
Short-Term Success Short-term success is achieved when volunteers provide the right amount of help to support caregivers.
Long-Term Success Long-term success of volunteer services are achieved when family members are not overburdened when serving as home caregivers and when patients receive all the help they need from volunteer services.
Program Success Monitored By
  1. NorthCare Hospice maintains statistical records that track how many volunteers and how many volunteer service hours each patient receives. 
  2. DEYTA LLC, the largest hospice benchmark data base in the U.S., evaluates family satisfaction of a wide range of hospice services, including volunteer services, and compares those outcomes to those of over 1,700 hospices nationwide.  Any concerns identified are addressed at regular meetings of the Quality and Assurance and Improvement Committee, which sets objectives and establishes methods of improving and measuring program outcomes. 
Examples of Program Success
  • In 2015, 120 NorthCare Hospice volunteers provided 10,443 hours hours of service and the equivalent of 5.8% of staff patient care hours. 
  • In the most recent 2015 DEYTA Family Satisfaction Survey 96.7% of NorthCare Hospice families stated that they received the right amount of volunteer support. 
CEO Comments

Hospice patients often are referred very late in the course of illness. Unfortunately, the late referral to the program means patients and their families will not receive the maximum benefit they could receive if hospice staff had the opportunity to begin to work with the family sooner.  It also places higher burden on the hospice staff, as the circumstances are often already very intense when they walk through the door.  Building trust, getting the proper equipment, medications, and supplies in the home takes a bit of time, not to mention providing the emotional support and teaching for family members to prepare for the coming days.  However, staff are often able to take the situation from chaos, fear and confusion to a peaceful and comfortable experience in a very short time.  They can sometimes work absolute miracles.

 
The excellence of the work of Hospice is shown in Family Satisfaction scores.  The process of surveying families served is contracted to an outside company, which also compares our scores to over 1,700 hospices nationwide.  We are extremely proud of our scores which consistently exceed the national average.  
Executive Director/CEO
Executive Director Ms Pam Barrett
Term Start Jan 2015
Experience Ms. Barrett has served in various roles at NorthCare Hospice & Palliative Care for 18 years.  She began as a social worker, providing direct patient and family support.  She moved through the ranks from Social Worker to Team Manager to Chief Operating Officer to Executive Director.  Ms. Barrett provides statewide leadership as a member of the Board of Directors of the Missouri Hospice and Palliative Care Association and has assisted in a variety of roles with related professional organizations.
Co-CEO/Executive Director
Term Start
Compensation Last Year
Former CEOs
NameTerm
Ms. Kim Logan May 1998 - Dec 2014
Senior Staff
Title Medical Director
Experience/Biography

Dr. Anderson is an internist, medical oncologist and hospice/plliative care physician.  A graduate of Stanford University Medical School, he received postgraduate training at the University of Colorado in Denver and the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX.  Prior to becoming Medical Director at NCH in August of 2010 he taught and practiced medicine at the University of Missouri Health System, the MU Center for Health Ethics, the Sinclair School of Nursing and was a part-time medical director for Hospice Compassus, Inc. in the North Central Missouri office between 2006 and 2010. 

Title Director of Clinical Services
Experience/Biography

Ms. Carter has been with NorthCare Hospice for ten years has served in a variety of capacities. She began her NorthCare career as a RN Case Manager. She next became a Community Liaison and then a Team Manager. Ms. Carter received her Bachelor of Social Work from Kansas University and a Masters of Arts Organizational Administration from Mid-America Nazarene University

Staff
Paid Full-Time Staff 88
Paid Part-Time Staff 29
Volunteers 120
Paid Contractors 3
Retention Rate 70%
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Plans & Policies
Organization Has a Fundraising Plan Yes
Organization Has a Strategic Plan Yes
Management Succession Plan Yes
Organization Policy and Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistleblower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Collaborations
NorthCare Hospice collaborates with North Kansas City Hospital and other hospitals including the University of Kansas Hospital, Liberty, St. Lukes Northland and others. . We collaborate with local chapters of the American Heart Association, ALS Association, MDA, and the American Cancer Association. We engage students from local nursing schools, medical schools and social work schools. We are active members of North Kansas City Business Council and Northland Regional Chamber. The Darrel Bland Sertoma Club was created for and supports NorthCare’s mission, programs and activities. We also participate in the Grief Support Network, Northland Professionals in Aging, Metropolitan Discharge Planners Group, KC Partnership for Caregivers, KC 4 Aging and KC Regional Health Care Organization.
External Assessment and Accreditations
Assessment/AccreditationYear
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments Accreditation2013
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Heroes in Health Care, Kim LoganIngram's Magazine2007
Volunteer of the Year, Pete LaneMissouri Hospice & Palliative Care Association2008
Spirit of Philanthropy, Michelle & David CarpenterAssociation of Fundraising Professionals - Mid American Chapter2008
Lifetime Achievement Award, Dr. Jesse RobertsMissouri Hospice & Palliative Care Association2009
Top Doctors / Super Doctors, Dr. Clay AndersonKansas City Magazine2011
Nonie McCall Legislative Award, Kim LoganKansas City Regional Home Care Association2012
Top Doctors / Super Doctors, Dr. Clay AndersonKansas City Magazine2012
Program of the Year, Advanced Lung Disease ProgramMissouri Hospice and Palliative Care Association2013
Heroes in Health Nursing Award, Sue MatthewsIngram's Magazine2013
Fellow, Dr. Clay AndersonAmerican Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine2014
Program of the Year, Cardiac ProgramMissouri Hospice and OPalliative Care Associtaion2002
Government Licenses
Is your organization licensed by the government? Yes
CEO Comments
Challenges are many
  • Finding the right staff is central to success. Not everyone wants to work with people who are not going to get better. There are those who do find it a deep calling, but there are not many of them.
  • Financial pressures are enormous. Hospice is a small but extraordinarily important part of the health care system. Hospice is paid a flat rate by the payers, regardless of what it actually costs to care for the patient. And it often costs more to provide excellent care than is paid by Medicare and others.
  • Regulatory requirements are perpetually changing and keeping up with each new requirement is resource and time intense.


Board Chair
Board Chair Ms. Elaine McIntosh
Company Affiliation Kansas City Hospice & Palliative Care
Term July 2015 to June 2017
Email emcintosh@kchospice.org
Board Members
NameAffiliation
Ms. Jody Abbott North Kansas City Hospital
Ms. Sheilahn Davis-Wyatt Health Care Administration
Mr. Bill Dichiser Kansas City Hospice & Palliative Care
Ms. Darla Easley Nurse Manager, North Kansas City Hospital
Ms. Jennifer Kozin North Kansas City Hospital, VP General Counsel
Ms. Elaine McIntosh Kansas City Hospice & Palliative Care
Ms. Donna Payne Private Consultant, Coach
Mr. John Sinnett Retired
Mr. David Wiley Kansas City Hospice & Palliative Care
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 8
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 3
Female 6
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 1
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 96%
Written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 0%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 6
CEO Comments
Governance is a huge responsibility in any not-for-profit and this is acutely felt by the Board of Hospice.  The Board knows, as does the staff, that we only get one chance to get it right for the families we serve and so we know how important it is that Hospice has adequate resources, strong staff, up-to-date equipment, etc.  Thus the Board strives to balance the acute need for long term financial stability with a finite resource picture.
 
Hospice is also a highly complex organization and it takes a meaningful, multi-year commitment to really understand the organization and to be able to thoughtfully govern.  Recruitment of capable people who understand Board function and who have a deep respect for the service is a critical part of our job as members of the governing board. 
 
It should be noted that the current Board is a new Board and while members have not made financial contributions within the first few months, we fully anticipate full participation in the months ahead. 
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01, 2015
Fiscal Year End June 30, 2016
Projected Revenue $9,307,994
Projected Expenses $9,498,134
IRS Letter of Exemption
Foundation Comments
  • FYE 6/30/2015, 2014, 2013:  Financial data reported using the organization's internal financial documents.
Detailed Financials
 
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$9,517,596$10,242,878$10,756,053
Administration Expense$1,003,576$1,079,330$1,128,112
Fundraising Expense$0$0$0
Payments to Affiliates$0$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.880.871.08
Program Expense/Total Expenses90%90%91%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue------
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$2,903,469$0$0
Current Assets$1,511,410$0$0
Long-Term Liabilities$0$0$0
Current Liabilities$302,833$0$0
Total Net Assets$2,600,636$0$0
Short-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities4.99----
Long-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%----
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- --Medicare $10,425,263
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- --Missouri Medicaid $1,234,550
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- --Commercial Insurance $549,794
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years No
Organization Comments

The need for a strong financial base is critical. The intense nature of hospice makes financial challenges very, very difficult.  Therefore we strive to create a strong financial base, which provides the long term ballast necessary for the organization to flourish and fully serve the community at the highest level of excellence. 

Organization Name NorthCare Hospice & Palliative Care
Address NorthCare Hospice House
2800 Clay Edwards Drive, 2nd Floor
North Kansas City, MO 64116
Primary Phone (816) 6915119
CEO/Executive Director Ms Pam Barrett
Board Chair Ms. Elaine McIntosh
Board Chair Company Affiliation Kansas City Hospice & Palliative Care
Year of Incorporation 2005
Former Names
Barr Hospice