KSDS, Inc.
120 W. 7th Street
Washington KS 66968
Contact Information
Address 120 W. 7th Street
Washington, KS 66968-
Telephone (785) 325-2256
Fax (785) 325-2258
Email ksds@ksds.org
Web and Social Media
Spring Class 2013

 

Mission Statement
KSDS mission is to promote the independence and inclusion of people with disabilities as fully participating and contributing members of their communities and society.  This is accomplished through a unique resource, a highly trained canine, selectively matched with a human partner, forming a team.  The dog will provide assistance either specifically for their partner or they will help their partner assist others in prevailing over their disabilities.  Placements occur at no charge to the person receiving the dog.  Continuing support for the graduates is also part of the services offered.  The support is utilized to keep the team working at peak performance and is offered throughout the life of the partnership.  The staff provides one-on-one training for specialized needs and on-going support to all teams.  KSDS assistance dogs are valued at $25,000, and has given away over $12 million in product and services since 1991.
 
KSDS was the first organization in the USA to provide both guide and service dog programs from within the same facility.  KSDS has placed teams in 32 different states and has volunteer puppy raisers located in 16 states.
 
KSDS is a fully accredited  member of Assistance Dogs International ( ADI).  ADI is a coalition of programs from around the world which train and place canine assistance dogs that formed in 1987.  Together the coalition established the standards and ethics for training and placing assistance dogs.
 
KSDS relies on the contributions from individuals, corporations, service clubs, wills and bequests.  KSDS' corporate sponsors include Hills Pet Nutrition, Kansas State University, Merial, Zoetis, Bayer, and Novartis.  The majority of KSDS corporate sponsors provide support by means of donating product or services that directly benefit puppies, dogs in training or teams that have graduated.  Lions Clubs of Kansas provide funding to help offset costs incurred by students while attending classes at KSDS during the placement process.
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Glenda Keller
Board Chair Mr. Roger Post
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired from Farm Credit Bank
History and Background
Year of Incorporation 1990
Former Names
Midwest Canine Assistance
Kansas Specialty Dog Service, Inc.
Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Revenue $575,500
Projected Expenses $575,500
Statements
Mission Statement
KSDS mission is to promote the independence and inclusion of people with disabilities as fully participating and contributing members of their communities and society.  This is accomplished through a unique resource, a highly trained canine, selectively matched with a human partner, forming a team.  The dog will provide assistance either specifically for their partner or they will help their partner assist others in prevailing over their disabilities.  Placements occur at no charge to the person receiving the dog.  Continuing support for the graduates is also part of the services offered.  The support is utilized to keep the team working at peak performance and is offered throughout the life of the partnership.  The staff provides one-on-one training for specialized needs and on-going support to all teams.  KSDS assistance dogs are valued at $25,000, and has given away over $12 million in product and services since 1991.
 
KSDS was the first organization in the USA to provide both guide and service dog programs from within the same facility.  KSDS has placed teams in 32 different states and has volunteer puppy raisers located in 16 states.
 
KSDS is a fully accredited  member of Assistance Dogs International ( ADI).  ADI is a coalition of programs from around the world which train and place canine assistance dogs that formed in 1987.  Together the coalition established the standards and ethics for training and placing assistance dogs.
 
KSDS relies on the contributions from individuals, corporations, service clubs, wills and bequests.  KSDS' corporate sponsors include Hills Pet Nutrition, Kansas State University, Merial, Zoetis, Bayer, and Novartis.  The majority of KSDS corporate sponsors provide support by means of donating product or services that directly benefit puppies, dogs in training or teams that have graduated.  Lions Clubs of Kansas provide funding to help offset costs incurred by students while attending classes at KSDS during the placement process.
Background Statement
KSDS, Inc. was incorporated as Kansas Specialty Dog Service in January 1990 by a committee of Kansas 4-H families to fill the void of accessibility to service and guide dogs in the Midwest. With a one-time $500,000 in start-up funding from the State of Kansas and additional support from donors, KSDS now includes a state-of-the art kennel, modern year-round training facility and an administrative building.
 
KSDS, Inc. is dedicated to the training and placement of assistance dogs in three areas. Guide dogs are trained to help people who are blind or visually impaired travel safely from one place to another by navigating sidewalks, alerting to stairs, crossing streets and avoiding obstacles. Service dogs provide assistance to people with other physical disabilities. Some of their trained skills include: retrieving dropped or selected items, assisting in dressing/undressing, pulling wheelchairs, bracing for balance or transfers, turning lights on/off, and opening doors. KSDS was the first in the nation to train both guide dogs and service dogs within the same facility.
 
Facility dogs are trained to work with a professional in the field of education, counseling, medicine, rehabilitation, retirement and specialty agencies. The facility dog program will place dogs with professionals in schools to help at-risk children learn social skills and personal development as well as academics so they will be able to succeed in school, in the workforce, in their family relationships and in life. Through a facility dog children can learn about caring, self-control, respect, empathy, communication, motivation, self confidence, persistence, responsibility, sequencing and literacy. Rehab hospitals, hospices, nursing homes and retirement centers, counseling centers and retirement centers use social dogs to improve the overall health of people through improved morale, diminished depression and greater self-confidence. One Alzheimer’s patient who had not uttered a word in six months spoke on his first introduction to the social dog. Physical health is improved through increased circulation and relief from aliments such as arthritis through movement from petting or playing with a dog.
Impact Statement

Accomplishments:
  • Applied for community service tax credits with approval of renovation plans for The Class Expansion Project at KSDS;
  • Finished repairs on training building from May, 2013 tornado damage.
  • Increased personnel/training staff at KSDS by hiring a new trainer apprentice who started work in June, 2014.
 
The goals for 2014 include:
  • Complete the renovation of the Class Expansion Project to create additional training space, and kitchen, gift shop, accessible bathrooms, and storm shelter.
  • KSDS has an endowment fund established with the Cornelia Byrnes fund.   KSDS would like to continue to add funds to this account for  the financial stability of KSDS to provide for future needs.
  • Increase annual assistance dog team placements at KSDS.
Needs Statement
  1. Hire a CEO at KSDS.            
  2. Renovation of original KSDS building for additional indoor training space, gift shop, and kitchen area.
  3. Funding for endowment fund.
  4. Puppy raisers are needed to raise puppies for KSDS.
  5. Additional training staff is needed in order that KSDS can increase the number of team placements annually.  Training staff needs to expand more in order that KSDS can increase number of team placements each year, to keep up with the demand, especially for service dogs.  Currently, there is a 3-4 year wait for a service dog at KSDS. 
Service Categories
Animal Training
Blind/Visually Impaired Centers, Services
Areas of Service
MO
KS
AK
AZ
AR
CA
CO
FL
IL
IA
LA
MI
NE
NV
NM
OH
OK
OR
PA
TN
TX
VA
WA
WI
WY
ND
IN
GA
AR
KY
AL
IN
CEO/Executive Director/Board Chair Statement
KSDS, Inc. experiences a great working relationship between Board of Directors, CEO and staff. The Board is strong and represents a broad spectrum of expertise. Each member of the Board brings his or her unique talents to the board. Every member of The Board is passionate about and focused on providing guidance to KSDS, Inc. in all areas required to fulfill their mission statement.
 
One of the greatest successes is the continuing support of KSDS, Inc. puppy raisers. Their involvement in the various communities throughout the United States brings positive input to KSDS, Inc. Because of their commitment and passion to the mission of KSDS, Inc., puppy raisers participate in many of our educational and outreach programs throughout the various states in which they are located. Another success story is the graduates of the KSDS, Inc. program. This includes individuals who are sight challenged with guide dogs, individuals who are physically challenged with service dogs, and social dogs who work with a professional in the area of education, medicine, counseling, physical therapy, and rehabilitation. Our graduates are located in 32 states of the United States.
 
One of our biggest challenges is to receive financial support from areas where graduates reside. The individuals in these communities plus the communities themselves have received benefits from KSDS, Inc. although we are not located in their area. This challenge is being addressed with additional education and outreach within the communities.
Programs
Description
KSDS has three programs providing canine assistance. The Guide Program provides guide dogs to individuals who are blind or visually impaired so they may travel safely by navigating sidewalks and streets, and avoiding obstacles. The Service Program provides highly-trained canines for people with physical disabilities to help with balancing, pulling wheelchairs, opening/closing doors and retrieving dropped items. The Social Program provides dogs trained to work with a professional in the field of education, counseling, medicine, rehabilitation, retirement or other specialty agencies. The dog works with the professional by facilitating the successful completion of specific goals. Many of our social teams work in public education. Through a social dog, children can learn about caring, self-control, respect, empathy, communication, motivation, self confidence, persistence, responsibility, sequencing and literacy. Rehab hospitals, social workers, doctors, hospices, nursing homes and retirement centers use social dogs to improve the overall health of people through improved morale, diminished depression and greater self-confidence.  Staff provides one-on-one training for specialized needs and on-going support to all teams.
Category Human Services, General/Other Services for Individuals with Disabilities
Population Served People/Families with of People with Disabilities, Children and Youth (0 - 19 years),
Short-Term Success Short term success is measured by graduation from the program. Students attend training at the KSDS facilities to learn how to care for the dog, the commands used, how to praise for results, easier ways to achieve the desired results and a number of other subjects that will help them handle the dog. At the end of the training the students must pass an access test that shows they have learned how to do the things that they were taught during class. When they pass this access test they graduate from the program, return home with their new assistance dog and can contact KSDS training instructors for individualized continuing support as needed.
Long-Term Success Long-term success is measured by a successful placement which is a confident happy team working safely together to achieve independence. With the help of assistance dogs people with disabilities live more independently, require less attendant care, experience easier/safer mobility and conserve physical energy for more involvement with community activities. Several KSDS graduates have been able to continue living in their own homes, further their education, gain employment, and operate their own business with the help of their specially trained partners. Placement with an assistance dog improves overall health through improved morale, diminished depression, greater self-confidence, fewer accidents and injuries, and higher levels of functionality. This benefits not only the person with the disability but also family, friends and society as a whole.
Program Success Monitored By Graduate follow-up reports are completed and evaluated every year. Graduates are required to complete re-certification every five years. They are also invited to a yearly retreat. Program goals are reviewed every six months and weekly staff meetings are used to set objectives to accomplish these goals. Apprentices are tested every three to four months in order to advance to the next level of apprenticeship.
Examples of Program Success “After serving 15 years in law enforcement, juvenile wet macular degeneration forced me to give up the job I loved. Everyday activities became a challenge. With every trip, or fall, or near miss with a car, I became more depressed. I started to withdraw from life, participating in nothing, doing nothing. I went into a very deep almost terminal depression. I looked into getting a guide dog, went to KSDS for an interview and ‘test drove’ a dog. I was able to walk with my head up and at my old stride instead of the bent hesitant shuffle I'd endured for too long. With the confidence I regained because of my guide dog partner I was able to begin a new career and am trying things that I never thought I would be able to do.” Ernie. Before coming to KSDS, Joan was living with family, using a power chair and on oxygen. Within 3 months of graduating from KSDS, she moved into her own apartment, didn’t need the extra oxygen and was walking with the help of her new dog. The list goes on and on.
Description Puppies are placed with foster puppy raisers at 8 weeks of age. For the next 12 to 18 months the foster puppy raisers teach the puppies basic obedience and create socialization opportunities both at home and in public. This is a vital group for the organization and the staff provides training and support to the puppy raisers during this critical time.
Category Human Services, General/Other Services for Specific Populations
Population Served People/Families with of People with Physical Disabilities, ,
Short-Term Success Short term success of this program happens when the foster puppy raiser returns a dog that has been trained basic obedience, house manners and socialization so that it is ready to go into a specific program either guide or service.
Long-Term Success Long-term success is measured by a successful placement which is a confident happy team working safely together to achieve independence. With the help of assistance dogs people with disabilities live more independently, require less attendant care, experience easier/safer mobility and conserve physical energy for more involvement with community activities. Several KSDS graduates have been able to continue living in their own homes, further their education, gain employment, and operate their own business with the help of their specially trained partners. Placement with an assistance dog improves overall health through improved morale, diminished depression, greater self-confidence, fewer accidents and injuries, and higher levels of functionality. This benefits not only the person with the disability but also family, friends and society as a whole.
Program Success Monitored By Puppy raiser reports are completed and evaluated every month. Each dog returned is extensively evaluated before being placed in any of the programs. Program goals are reviewed every six months and weekly staff meetings are used to set objectives to accomplish these goals. Apprentices are tested every three to four months in order to advance to the next level of apprenticeship.
Examples of Program Success “I am blind & work with a guide from Guide Dogs for the Blind; I encountered one of your teams during a recent bus ride. I was apprehensive when the bus driver notified me that another service animal was boarding - as I have had a number of negative experiences with other "service animals". I was in for a pleasant surprise! - Both dog & handler were professional, efficient & courteous. Upon striking up a conversation with the handler - while our dogs completely ignored each other - I learned about the services and training that your organization provides. I was so impressed that I felt compelled to contact you regarding the experience. If this team is any indication of the quality of work your organization is doing then you are turning out some of the finest teams in the country.” Kevin L. Bird, Vice-President Rogue Valley Chapter, American Council of the Blind of Oregon
Description
KSDS, Inc. began a program with the Topeka Correctional Facility in March of 1996. The inmates were originally puppy raisers for KSDS. Newly and Sam, 7 week old Labrador Retrievers from the "Gunsmoke" litter were paired with two inmates who had applied to participate in the program. A year later, a 7 month old Golden Retriever joined the program. The TCF trainers did such a good job with the first 3 pups that more puppies were selected to succeed them. Shortly thereafter the KDOC funding for the program was cut. However, the inmates who cared for the dogs rallied and formulated a funding plan. TCF approved the program. In April of 1998, a meeting was held to reorganize the program. The name chosen was "Pooches & Pals". In March of 1998, TCF became the first and only KDOC facility to have dogs placed in their facility in the second phase of assistance training.  The program soon grew to a third phase, Advanced Training.
 
During the past sixteen years, the women at Topeka Correctional Facility have raised puppies, worked dogs in basic obedience in the intermediate program, and started the basics of service dog training.  KSDS is proud to have this ongoing association with Pooches and Pals and the women who put their hearts and souls into these dogs.  "The dogs teach us as well," one of the women said.  " They teach patience, communication and give unconditional love to all who are involved with them."
 
The anniversary in 2013 of this partnership was celebrated with talks from several individuals who have worked with the teams. Certificates were also awarded to those who have gone above and beyond to make this all happen.
 
To date TCF has taken part in the training of  over 200 KSDS dogs.
Category Human Services, General/Other Services for Individuals with Disabilities
Population Served People/Families with of People with Disabilities, ,
Short-Term Success The Pooches and pals program accelerates the ability of KSDS to match the dogs with handicapped individuals upon their return to KSDS, Inc.
Long-Term Success KSDS, Inc. has had a collaborative relationship with TCF since March 1996. The Intermediate Training Program and Advanced Service Training have been in place since 1999 and 2000 respectively. Pooches and Pals adopted the following mission statement, "To give back to society through helping physically challenged persons by the training and support of assistance dogs." Commitment to their mission has accelerated the ability of KSDS to match the dogs with handicapped individuals upon their return to KSDS. The ultimate result is the increasing number of teams working together to achieve independence. In addition, over 200 TCF inmates have taken the opportunity to work toward a higher standard and achieve membership into the Pooches & Pals program. As one member stated, "The KSDS dogs that we train are amazing and can help a person in so many different ways. These dogs mean so much to us here at the prison as well. The program gives us an opportunity to give back to the community..."
Program Success Monitored By The TCF training program is monitored on-site by a staff member working at Topeka Correctional Facility. In addition, the Pooches and Pals members send in monthly progress reports to the KSDS trainers. These monthly reports are monitored by KSDS staff to assess the progress of the dogs. Conference calls are used by Senior Staff and TCF Staff to confer on the progress of the dogs as well as the training skill levels of the members of Pooches and Pals. Training sessions are presented to Pooches and Pals members by the KSDS Senior Training Staff. KSDS has developed a set of written and practical tests which are used to qualify experienced Pooches and Pals members to train dogs at the Advanced Service level within the TCF Facility.
Examples of Program Success During the first eight years of the TCF dog program, 108 KSDS dogs were trained.  Additionally, several Pooches and Pals members have worked on various training teams. To date, over 200 KSDS dogs have been trained through this program.  Many of these ladies have also been released from TCF and placed constructively within their home communities. They fulfilled the mission of Pooches & Pals, having earned their own freedom even as they helped give freedom and independence to others through the training of these assistance dogs.   This program provides good socialization for the dogs as well as a beneficial and rewarding experience for the TCF women who participate.
Description KSDS provides disability related education to the general public through tours of our facility as well as presentations at schools, civic organizations, cultural events and other public and private gatherings. Through these activities KSDS educates the public about disability related issues including laws, regulations, rights, etiquette etc. This education helps the general population to encourage people with disabilities to become involved in their community.
Category Human Services, General/Other Services for Individuals with Disabilities
Population Served People/Families with of People with Physical Disabilities, ,
Short-Term Success Short term success of this program is measured by the knowledge gained by the participants of the program. The participants learn about how assistance dogs are trained and why they are trained that way. Participants learn about different disabilities, how the person with the disability is affected and how assistance dogs can help them. Then they are given tips so that they can be more comfortable about approaching and helping someone with a disability.
Long-Term Success The National Organization on Disability identifies the greatest factors leading to lack of community participation as “fear, discomfort or perceived negative attitudes” and “the lack of encouragement from community organizations”. According to A Framework for Promoting the Health of People with Disabilities, “Interventions that promote the integration (or reintegration) of people with disabilities into school, work or other community settings will promote other opportunities as well as lower the barriers of social stigma and isolation”. This program will provide people with disabilities the support and encouragement they need to become active and contributing members of their communities and society.
Program Success Monitored By Volunteer and staff presenters are provided with training and personal experiences so that they have the skills necessary to speak to the general population about disability related issues. The presenters gauge the audience’s reaction to the presentation given and their knowledge gained from the presentation.
Examples of Program Success Most of our feedback comes from observation while working in public and listening to people talk about what they know about assistance dogs. Since we do several programs for schools, we often hear children explaining to their parents or other adults about the things that they have learned. Through this learning process they know that they can talk to a person with a disability and not be scared. They also know what they should and shouldn’t do in association with an assistance dog so that the dog will still be able to work. People also learn about how they can help a person with a disability and then go above and beyond in helping. There are people who take time off work and out of their own busy schedules to take a person with a disability to places they need to go. For example one graduate owns an accessible van but is unable to drive it, so helpful citizens who have heard about the situation volunteer to drive the owner to the places she needs to go.
CEO Comments People with many types of disabilities gain independence with assistance from a KSDS, Inc. guide or service dog. The skills the dogs are trained to perform help the individuals accomplish many of the small tasks that each of us, as able bodied people, take for granted each day: picking up dropped keys, opening a door to a local business, stepping up a 3 inch curb, or maneuvering a route safely. An assistance dog helps the person conserve energy so they have the stamina to be employed, go to school, or just leave home with the confidence they can return when they desire. Assistance dogs facilitate inclusion in the community as people talk with individuals about their dogs instead of avoiding interaction because of their disability. Social dogs work with a professional in fields such as education, counseling, or rehabilitation. KSDS is proud of its quality product in canine assistance. Volunteers in the puppy raising program are the base for development of the puppies in preparation for assistance work. The quality breeding program insures strengths in conformation, attitude, and aptitude. Throughout puppy hood, puppy raisers channel the energy and intelligence of the puppy into a confident young dog with a desire to learn and serve their new partner. It is difficult to return a puppy to KSDS for the formal training, but it is rewarding to meet the person to whom the dog gives independence. Tours and programs are given by staff, puppy raisers, team graduates, and other volunteers to promote KSDS, Inc. Presentations assist with advocacy for people with disabilities, awareness about assistance dogs in public, proper behavior for people around dogs, and specific support opportunities for KSDS, Inc. Successful assistance dog teams happen because of teamwork in each program area of KSDS, Inc.
Executive Director/CEO
Executive Director Mrs. Glenda Keller
Term Start Apr 2013
Experience
In April, 2013, Glenda Keller was appointed as interim CEO for KSDS. She will lead the organization through the Assistance Dogs International accreditation process. The KSDS Board of Directors will advertise the position for CEO in 2014 and will be interviewing next spring. Glenda has shown a special interest in KSDS as she was part of the 4-H group from which KSDS started. Glenda is also a former KSDS board member.
Former CEOs
NameTerm
Mrs. Judith M. Sifers July -
Larry Stigge Jan 2011 - Oct 2012
Senior Staff
Title Guide Instructor
Experience/Biography Debbie Tegethoff is KSDS Guide Dog Instructor.   Deb joined the KSDS staff  in June, 1999.   She is certified in both human and pet first aid and CPR. Debbie is President of  the local Washington Lions Club and is District Chairperson in Lions District "I" representing KSDS.  She is also a member of G.F.W.C. Modern Pioneers Study Club in Washington.
Title Service and Social Dog Trainer
Experience/Biography  Annette Metz is the Service and Social DogTraining Instructor.  Annette worked at KSDS for 5 years and took off some time to raise her family.  In December, 2011, Annette returned to KSDS full time.  Annette brings experience in training dogs and KSDS welcomes her back. Annette is certified in CPR and First Aid, and is active in school events and community events.

Annette states, “ Returning to KSDS has always been my goal. I am excited and blessed to be back working and reconnecting with Graduates and Puppy Raisers. I enjoy the opportunity to make a positive difference in the lives of people with disabilities through highly trained canines.”

Title
Experience/Biography
Staff
Full-Time Staff 15
Volunteers 300
Contractors 1
Retention Rate 75%
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Semi-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Semi-Annually
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Semi-Annually
Plans & Policies
Organization Has a Fundraising Plan Yes
Organization Has a Strategic Plan Yes
Management Succession Plan Yes
Organization Policy and Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistleblower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
Collaborations
KSDS is fully accredited with Assistance Dogs International, (ADI), International Association of Assistance Dog Partners, Guide Dog Users, Inc. KSDS facilitates a program with Topeka Correctional Facility, and Norton Correctional Facility, to train service and guide dogs. Washington County Schools, USD #108, Hills Pet Food Company, Kansas State University Veterinary School, AmeriCorp, RSVP of Marshall County, Washington County Tourism, and Washington Homestead Nursing Home.
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Independent Charities of America2006
Assistance Dogs International (ADI)2003
Community Health Charities2008
External Assessment and Accreditations
Assessment/AccreditationYear
Assistance Dogs International Inc.2008
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
RSVP Site of the YearAmeriCorps*R.S.V.P.2004
AccreditationAssistance Dogs International2008
Commitment to Washington County KansasWashington County Development Corporation2005
recognition awardRSVP award2008
Kansas Business Excellence AwardKansas Department of Commerce2010
Government Licenses
Is your organization licensed by the government? No
CEO Comments Each member of the Board of Directors is dedicated to the KSDS, Inc. mission and brings a different area of expertise to the table in guidance: disabilities, education, finance, business, communication, canine behaviors, and kennel management. The importance of individualism is proven in the diversity of graduated teams. Consideration in the needs and abilities of each applicant lends to the success of graduates in all aspects of life be it student, homemaker, career oriented, or retired. The youngest person to receive a KSDS service dog was seven years old and the dog was able to open doors for him physically as well as open the doors to communicating and participating in activities with classmates. The oldest person to receive a KSDS guide dog was 83 years of age and with canine assistance, he was able to continue living independently for the next nine years. A constituent task force works with KSDS training staff to provide follow-up mentoring in skills development, at-home routines, and public access issues for graduate teams. A mark of quality for KSDS, Inc. is the achievement of accreditation through Assistance Dogs International (ADI) in 2004. ADI is an international coalition of schools in training Guide, Hearing, and Service Dogs. The objectives of ADI are to promote standards of excellence in all areas of Assistance Dog programs and facilitate communication, learning, and education among member organizations and the public. KSDS has maintained Full-Voting membership since 1994. KSDS is also a member of Kansas Non-Profit Association and is affiliated with American Council for the Blind and International Association of Assistance Dog Partners. KSDS has been a sponsoring organization for AmeriCorps *VISTA, RSVP, and NCCC and utilized the resources for funding and marketing development, volunteers, and renovation assistance in preparation to expand the number of assistance dog teams placed annually.
Board Chair
Board Chair Mr. Roger Post
Company Affiliation Retired from Farm Credit Bank
Term July 2014 to July 2015
Board CoChair
Board CoChair Mr. Roger Post
Company Affiliation Sit-Stay Kennel
Term July 2012 to July 2013
Board Members
NameAffiliation
Mr. Brent Boring Retired.
Mrs. Lila Keesecker Keesecker Agri-business
Mrs. Regina Linenberger Marcon
Mrs. Marilyn McGown Retired.
Mrs. Midge Miller USDA
Mrs. Abby Murray Community Volunteer
Mr. Roger Post Sit-Stay Kennel
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 7
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 2
Female 5
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 0
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 88%
Written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 8
Standing Committees
Executive
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Finance
CEO Comments Each member of the Board of Directors is dedicated to the KSDS, Inc. mission and brings a different area of expertise to the table in guidance: disabilities, education, finance, business, communication, canine behaviors, and kennel management. The importance of individualism is proven in the diversity of graduated teams. Consideration in the needs and abilities of each applicant lends to the success of graduates in all aspects of life be it student, homemaker, career oriented, or retired. The youngest person to receive a KSDS service dog was seven years old and the dog was able to open doors for him physically as well as open the doors to communicating and participating in activities with classmates. The oldest person to receive a KSDS guide dog was 83 years of age and with canine assistance, he was able to continue living independently for the next nine years. A constituent task force works with KSDS training staff to provide follow-up mentoring in skills development, at-home routines, and public access issues for graduate teams. A mark of quality for KSDS, Inc. is the achievement of accreditation through Assistance Dogs International (ADI) in 2003. ADI is an international coalition of schools training Guide, Hearing, and Service Dogs. The objectives of ADI are to promote standards of excellence in all areas of Assistance Dog programs and facilitate communication, learning, and education among member organizations and the public. KSDS has maintained Full-Voting membership since 1994. KSDS is also a member of Kansas Non-Profit Association and is affiliated with American Council for the Blind and International Association of Assistance Dog Partners. KSDS has been a sponsoring organization for AmeriCorps *VISTA, RSVP, and NCCC and utilized the resources for funding and marketing development, volunteers, and renovation assistance in preparation to expand the number of assistance dog teams placed annually.
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01, 2013
Fiscal Year End June 30, 2014
Projected Revenue $575,500
Projected Expenses $575,500
Endowment Value $43,373
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage 0%
Form 990s
2013 KSDS 990
2012 Form 990
2011 KSDS 990
2010 KSDS 990
2009 KSDS 990
IRS Letter of Exemption
Detailed Financials
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201320122011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$931,486$1,647,957$514,428
Government Contributions$0$0$0
Federal$0$0$0
State$0$0$0
Local$0$0$0
Unspecified$0$0$0
Individual Contributions$0$0$0
$16,269$18,960$21,412
$40,207$26,987$32,833
Investment Income, Net of Losses$16,713$17,394$28,994
Membership Dues$0$0$0
Special Events$50,503$24,353$31,524
Revenue In-Kind$53,443$28,167$28,445
Other$52,597$3,825$0
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201320122011
Program Expense$608,150$475,140$412,302
Administration Expense$34,246$40,424$19,166
Fundraising Expense$57,071$54,831$42,880
Payments to Affiliates$0$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.663.101.39
Program Expense/Total Expenses87%83%87%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue6%3%8%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201320122011
Total Assets$4,121,655$3,605,063$2,449,151
Current Assets$2,892,908$2,397,410$1,709,018
Long-Term Liabilities$0$0$0
Current Liabilities$57,475$16,865$66,468
Total Net Assets$4,064,180$3,588,198$2,382,683
Short-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities50.33142.1525.71
Long-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201320122011
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountIndividual Donor $508,888 --Individual donor $1,048,573
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountIndividual Donor $128,497 --Individual donor $130,916
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountIndividual Donor $128,000 --Individual donor $121,430
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Campaign Purpose The capital campaign at KSDS is a renovation project of former building at KSDS to remodel the building to provide additional training space, kitchen, gift shop, and accessible bathrooms and a tornado shelter. This building has been empty for several years, since KSDS left the building due to accessibility and high utility costs. The Class Expansion Project will create additional training space for KSDS in order that KSDS can increase the number of annual team placements by twenty-five percent.
Goal $400,000.00
Dates Jan 2014 to Dec 2014
Amount Raised to Date 153000 as of May 2014
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years No
Foundation Comments
  • FYE 6/30/2013, 2012, 2011, 2010:  Financial data reported using IRS Form 990.  Audited financial statements also provided. 
  • Foundation/corporation revenue line item may include contributions from individuals.
Organization Name KSDS, Inc.
Address 120 W. 7th Street
Washington, KS 66968
Primary Phone (785) 325-2256
Contact Email ksds@ksds.org
CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Glenda Keller
Board Chair Mr. Roger Post
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired from Farm Credit Bank
Year of Incorporation 1990
Former Names
Midwest Canine Assistance
Kansas Specialty Dog Service, Inc.