Rose Brooks Center, Inc.
PO Box 320599
Kansas City MO 64132-0599
Bringing Families Hope


Web and Phone Contact
Telephone (816) 523-5550
Mission Statement
The mission of Rose Brooks Center is to break the cycle of domestic violence so that individuals and families can live free of abuse.
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Susan Miller
Board Chair Ms. Jennifer Gille-Bacon
Board Chair Company Affiliation Polsinelli
History and Background
Year of Incorporation 1978
Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Revenue $5,566,858
Projected Expenses $5,566,858
Statements
Mission Statement The mission of Rose Brooks Center is to break the cycle of domestic violence so that individuals and families can live free of abuse.
Background Statement

Rose Brooks Center began in 1978 when a group of volunteers, concerned about the abuse of women in the Kansas City area, opened a 24-hour crisis hotline. On October 1, 1979, following the death of Rosa Brooks and donation of her home to the cause, Rose Brooks Center opened its first 19-bed emergency shelter. Within 24 hours, all beds were occupied. As the needs of the women and children staying in the shelter were identified, Rose Brooks Center began providing supportive services, including counseling and support groups.

Since August 2001, Rose Brooks Center has occupied a 45,000 square foot campus with emergency shelter, children’s programming, outreach services, and administrative services all onsite, resulting in an effective continuum of care for the women and children we serve. As a result of the dramatic increase in demand for services over the past several years, Rose Brooks Center recently completed an expansion which significantly increased our capacity to serve more women and children. The expansion included the addition of resident rooms, facilities for outreach services, a health clinic, as well as the only onsite pet shelter in our region for residents with pets.

Founded by volunteers, Rose Brooks Center still depends substantially on generous individuals willing to donate their time and resources. Rose Brooks Center leverages the help of over 3,000 volunteers every year.

Our comprehensive services include the following: a 24-hour crisis line; emergency shelter for women and children; children’s therapeutic programming; case management, economic empowerment programming; financial literacy and management education; employment advocacy; court advocacy; outreach therapy; a housing and economic advocacy program; a school-based violence prevention program including therapy, peer groups, and classroom education; a hospital-based crisis intervention and advocacy program serving eight local hospitals and eleven clinics; and a Lethality Assessment Program with local police patrols.

In 2015, Rose Brooks Center provided 30,899 safe nights to women and children in shelter, 25,802 safe nights to women and children in housing, answered 7,857 calls from individuals and families searching for help and support, offered 4,962 hours of counseling and services to 422 women and children, served 1,290 survivors through our hospital-based advocacy program, and helped 1,486 survivors navigate the legal system.

Impact Statement

Rose Brooks Center envisions a world free of violence. We serve as a leader of innovative, comprehensive family violence services, sharing our legacy of hope through advocacy, education, and empowerment. We believe that violence can be eliminated if we commit to change. We’ve served the Kansas City community for 38 years, and we work daily to rebuild, reclaim, and save lives threatened by domestic violence.

 

2015-16 Accomplishments:
 
  • In 2015, Rose Brooks Center’s innovative intervention model of “Support Planning” was highlighted in the article “Promising Practices: Trauma-Informed Approaches to Working with Survivors of Domestic and Sexual Violence and Other Trauma.”
  • In 2015, Rose Brooks Center completed of the Kansas City Domestic Violence Community Safety Assessment Report Findings and Recommendations.
  • In 2016, the State Department designated Rose Brooks Center as the domestic violence shelter site to tour for international visitors.
  • Rose Brooks Center maintains, for the fourth consecutive year, the maximum 4-star rating by Charity Navigator, the country’s most-renowned charity evaluator, based on our strong financial health and commitment to accountability and transparency – only 9% of the charities evaluated received this recognition.
 
2016-17 Goals:
 
  • Strengthen and maximize collaborations with new and existing community partners.
  • Expand scope of Project SAFE to provide more comprehensive services to students, families, and schools.
  • Integrate Primary Prevention principles into existing child and teen services and broaden internal and external understanding of model.
  • Strengthen the internal capacity of Rose Brooks Center team and infrastructure to ensure the ability to effectively serve all individuals.
  • Create and maintain a safe, welcoming, and respectful environment for all individuals by strengthening agency's commitment to accessibility, cultural competency, trauma-informed care, and trauma stewardship.

 

Needs Statement
  1. Funding for our sustainability, allowing us to provide life-saving services to more individuals.
  2. Ongoing operating and program support.
  3. Funding and resources to ensure that our programs and facilities are accessible to all.
  4. Volunteers to assist with program-related activities, fundraising events, and facility maintenance.
  5. In-kind donations, such as food, clothing, personal care items, and household goods.

 

Service Categories
Family Violence Shelters and Services
Youth Development Programs
Housing Support
Areas of Service
MO
MO - Jackson County
MO - Clay County
MO - Platte County
KS - Wyandotte County
KS - Johnson County
MO - Eastern Jackson Co
MO - Jackson County Urban Core
KS - Wyandotte County Urban Core
National
CEO/Executive Director/Board Chair Statement

During my past 20 years as CEO, Rose Brooks Center’s thoughtful and purposeful expansion has been focused on removing barriers for survivors and achieving our mission of ending the cycle of domestic violence for individuals and families. Today, Rose Brooks Center offers a full continuum of services to increase victim safety and to heal and rebuild the lives of those impacted by domestic violence. Each of our programs and collaborative efforts furthers our commitment to our mission whether it is through supporting a survivor of domestic violence in crisis, or through partnering with the police department to better respond to survivors in need when they call for help, or through teaching our children and future leaders the skills to lead violence-free lives. Rose Brooks Center takes the life-saving work that we do seriously.

Our greatest success comes in our ability to impact the lives of those affected by domestic violence. We stand by victims every day in court as they seek safety through our justice systems despite their personal fears. We support survivors as they make the brave, though frightening, decision to begin their life anew within our shelter, often leaving their belongings behind in search of a new beginning. We train our community partners, including other services providers, law enforcement and medical professionals, on how to understand the nature and dynamics of domestic violence in hope that they, too, will advocate for survivors within their respective fields. Through these services and more, each year Rose Brooks Center impacts the lives of 15,000 people and makes our community a safer place for all. None of this would be possible without the support of our generous community and donors.

While proud of our successes, we acknowledge the great challenges that need to be addressed in order to reduce the alarming number of domestic violence incidents in our community. Unfortunately, the rate of these incidents remains critically high, as Rose Brooks Center is located in Jackson County and Kansas City—each of which ranks with the highest number of domestic violence incidents statewide. These figures translate into a desperate need for our services. Sadly, nearly every bed of Rose Brooks Center’s 100-bed shelter is occupied each night of the year, and in 2015, we answered 7,857 hotline calls, which averages to more than 20 calls per day. Our dedicated staff respond to individuals experiencing domestic violence crises with kindness, compassion and resources for safety.

Despite these challenges, we continue to move forward with hope and dedication while working diligently to overcome barriers. As we are currently in the process of preparing our new strategic plan, I have been meeting with all of the programs and directors to assist in developing future focus areas. This plan will be around three critical initiatives: Keeping Families Safe, Creating a Safer Community, and Breaking the Cycle of Domestic Violence. Rose Brooks Center has demonstrated its capacity to grow and sustain services throughout its nearly 40-year history by challenging itself to meet the complex, changing needs of victims. Together we can put an end to the cycle of domestic violence.

Programs
Description

Community members contacting the 24-Hour Crisis Line will receive support, information on community resources and how to access community resources, and develop a plan for safety. We will respond to an average of 80 victims per month who are identified by law enforcement as being at high risk for lethality. 

 

  • Our Emergency Shelter is a safe sanctuary where adults and children are welcomed, wrapped in support, and given time to heal.
  • PAWS pet shelter is available for families escaping abuse with their pet.
  • Children’s Program provides connection with counselors and other professionals and methods for children to express themselves to heal from their abuse.

 


Program Budget $1,393,716.00
Category Human Services, General/Other Family-Based Services
Population Served Families, Homeless, Victims
Short-Term Success

4,500 community members contacting the 24 Hour Crisis Line will receive assistance with developing a plan for safety.  The 24 hour crisis line will respond to an average of 80 victims per month who are at high risk for lethality.

 

Emergency Shelter

 

  • 90% will develop an individualized safety plan.
  • 80% will develop self-determined goals.
  • 80% will have their priority need addressed.
  • 75% will verbalize power and control tactics used by their abuser and the impact domestic violence has had on their lives.

 

 

Children's Program

 

  • Goal 1: 95% living in shelter for 14 days or more will be provided with nutritious meals, clothing, and referrals for medical care and immunizations.
  • Goal 2: 75% will practice keeping hands to themselves, using inside voices, encouraging others, speaking politely, listening when others talk, and respecting other people and things.
  • Goal 3: 90% over the age of five will develop a developmentally-appropriate safety plan prior to exiting shelter.

 

 

Long-Term Success
24 Hour Crisis Line
  • 75% of clients who called the hotline prior to coming to shelter will report that they received support and understanding from hotline operators. 
  • 75% of clients who called the hotline prior to coming to shelter will report that they received adequate information, resources, and referrals.

Emergency Shelter
Of the adults who reside in shelter for at least two weeks:
  • 85% will accomplish action steps detailed in a self-determined plan for housing. 
  • 75% will use community resources for goal achievement. 
  • 75% will complete domestic violence education curriculum. 
  • 60% will connect with a positive social support.

Children’s Program
  • 75% of children participating in at least 3 sessions will identify and then demonstrate developmentally appropriate behaviors when dealing with conflict and uncomfortable situations. 
  • 75% of the mothers participating in the family/parenting sessions will complete education on the varied and complex ways domestic violence affects children.
 
Program Success Monitored By
Rose Brooks Center uses a variety of methods to monitor success among is different programs, including: 
 
  • Weekly documentation of action steps
  • Goal completion on the participants’ personal goal plan
  • Participant surveys documenting knowledge gained and support provided
  • Administration of the Stages of Healing Observational Instrument at assessment, mid-term and exit from programs
  • Pre-scales and post-scales of children receiving schools-based services
 
Advocates, case managers and therapists enter outcome data into the Osnium database for each client. Designed specifically for domestic violence programs, the Osnium database allows the agency to generate aggregate client outcome reports as well as customized query reports for different demographics and programs.
Examples of Program Success

Sofia, 11,  came with her mother to Rose Brooks Center after her abusive father had threatened her mother’s life.  She arrived withdrawn, distrustful, and terrified.  Immediately, Sofia received warm meals, clothes, toiletries, a stuffed backpack and transportation to her new school. Working with a therapist, Sofia at first said she felt “empty” inside.  She then worked with therapeutic sand art.  Her first creation was ‘home,’ which she displayed with black sand, a leafless tree, and a small dark house. Over several months, Sofia worked with her therapist for coping strategies and tools of resilience.  A change took place. She stood straighter, laughed easily, and felt hopeful about her future. Her sand tray creations showed this transformation, with vibrant green sand, flowering trees, a stream, animals, and children playing. Upon leaving Rose Brooks, Sofia will still face challenges, but she carries with her new strategies for resilience. 

Description

In the safety of local hospitals and clinics, the Bridge Program serves adult and child patients who are experiencing domestic violence. The goal is to bridge the gap between medical services and domestic violence services in order to offer victims of domestic violence a life without abuse. 

  • Services are provided 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
  • Advocates provide a compassionate and confidential connection to support, including shelter, legal services, counseling, and help in planning for safety.
  • Medical staff receive continuous training from the Bridge Program staff on how to recognize and help patients who are experiencing domestic violence. 
Program Budget $390,502.00
Category Human Services, General/Other Personal Social Services
Population Served Victims, Homeless, Victims
Short-Term Success
  • 85% of clients receiving follow-up services will report that they received helpful resource information from the advocate. 
  • 75% of clients receiving follow-up will report that they engaged in at least one safety behavior.
Long-Term Success

  • 95% of victims of domestic violence will develop a personalized safety plan.
  • 25% of victims of domestic violence will complete one of the following steps: file for an Order of Protection, enter into a shelter, or press charges against their batterer.

 
Program Success Monitored By
Rose Brooks Center uses a variety of methods to monitor success among its different programs, including: 
 
  • Weekly documentation of action steps
  • Goal completion on the participants’ personal goal plan
  • Participant surveys documenting knowledge gained and support provided
  • Administration of the Stages of Healing Observational Instrument at assessment, mid-term and exit from programs
  • Pre-scales and post-scales of children receiving school-based services
 
Advocates, case managers and therapists enter outcome data into the Osnium database for each client. Designed specifically for domestic violence programs, the Osnium database allows the agency to generate aggregate client outcome reports as well as customized query reports for different demographics and programs.
Examples of Program Success When Sarah went to the emergency room, she had just been violently attacked by her husband. As she awaited treatment and 47 stitches, she was fearful to go home, yet unsure of what she could do. Thankfully, her physician referred her to the Bridge Program, and she was able to immediately meet with a Bridge Advocate. Sarah shared with the advocate her history of being physically and emotionally abused, isolated from friends and family, and the details of being attacked that evening. The advocate listened to Sarah as she shared these intimate details. She then began to safety plan with Sarah, discussing options such as pressing charges, filing a restraining order, seeking counseling, and finding safe shelter. Sarah decided that it was too dangerous for her to return home, and the advocate made arrangements for Sarah to go directly from the hospital to Rose Brooks Center’s emergency shelter.
Description

  • Support services help empower adult and child survivors of domestic violence to reclaim their lives through what can be a long and complex healing process.
  • Substance Abuse Counseling assists clients in navigating the recovery process. This is accomplished within the Rose Brooks Center treatment program, and also in more intensive treatment programs outside of shelter.   
  • Court Advocacy provides help to domestic violence survivors seeking relief and safety through complex court systems who may be overwhelmed and confused by the process. 

Program Budget $547,583.00
Category Human Services, General/Other Personal Social Services
Population Served Victims, Females, Victims
Short-Term Success

Support Services

  • 90% of survivors will develop an individualized plan for safety. 
  • 80% of survivors will identify knowledge, skills and abilities for accomplishing self-determined goals. 
  • 75% of survivors engaged in therapy services will verbalize power and control tactics used by their abuser and the impact domestic violence has had on their lives.
 
Substance Abuse Counseling

  • 25% abstinence from drug use in clients who successfully complete treatment. 
  • 75% of participating clients will identify and use a minimum of one social support.

 
Court Advocacy
  • 2,000 victims of domestic violence served at the Kansas City Municipal Court, Kansas City Police Department or Jackson County Adult Abuse Division will receive emotional support, information on how to navigate the criminal and civil justice system, options for safety and support from community agencies, and general education about the dynamics of domestic violence.
 
Long-Term Success

Support Services

Of the survivors who participate:
  • 85% will accomplish action steps detailed in a self-determined plan for housing. 
  • 75% will use community resources for goal achievement. 
  • 60% will connect with a positive social support.
 
Substance Abuse Counseling
  • 25% increased abstinence in clients who successfully complete treatment.
 
Court Advocacy
  • 90% of domestic violence victims served by the court advocacy program will develop a plan for safety. 
  • 90% of domestic violence victims served by the court advocacy program will increase knowledge of community resources to support their plan for safety and how to access these resources.
 


Program Success Monitored By
Rose Brooks Center uses a variety of methods to monitor success among its different programs, including: 
 
  • Weekly documentation of action steps
  • Goal completion on the participants’ personal goal plan
  • Participant surveys documenting knowledge gained and support provided
  • Administration of the Stages of Healing Observational Instrument at assessment, mid-term and exit from programs
  • Pre-scales and post-scales of children receiving school-based services
 
Advocates, case managers and therapists enter outcome data into the Osnium database for each client. Designed specifically for domestic violence programs, the Osnium database allows the agency to generate aggregate client outcome reports as well as customized query reports for different demographics and programs.
Examples of Program Success

In one case, the Victim Advocate assisted a victim who had been stalked by her (separated) husband. Due to the nature, severity and frequency of the phone calls the victim had received, the Victim Advocate advocated for her to be seen by the domestic violence police detective. The domestic violence detective realized the victim had received over 100 calls in one day, and hundreds in previous weeks. After safety planning, the Victim Advocate advised her to consider seeking shelter, which she then did. The police later informed the Victim Advocate that, as soon as the victim had left, her abuser had broken into her home, destroyed property, and was waiting for her to return. The police arrived on the scene and arrested him. State prosecutors charged the suspect and he was then incarcerated. The victim is certain that, had she not been contacted and gone to shelter, he would have killed her.

Description
Children/teens dealing with violence at home, in personal relationships, or in the community can receive support/counseling throughout the school year.
  • Peer support groups, individual counseling, and educational presentations provide students the tools needed to make positive life choices and develop healthy relationships.
  • Pre-school to high school students receive guidance on safety planning, anger control, healthy relationships, violence and substance abuse prevention, and building a positive sense of self.
  • School personnel are offered training and consultation on how they can help students break the cycle of violence in their communities.  
Category Human Services, General/Other Children & Youth Services
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years), ,
Short-Term Success

Goal ONE: Children will increase safety.

80% of Weekly Support Group, 95% of Individual Therapy, and 95% Classroom Education participants will complete a safety plan.
 
Goal TWO: Children will improve social skills.

75% of children will demonstrate appropriate social skills.

80% of children will be able to express their feelings in a healthy manner.

75% of children will begin to have a positive sense of self.

 


Long-Term Success

Goal: Children will improve their ability to respond to and deal with conflict.

90% of children will identify positive ways for responding to conflict.

80% of children will identify healthy coping strategies to deal with conflict.

75% of children will demonstrate non-aggressive methods for responding to conflict.

75% of children will demonstrate healthy coping strategies to deal with conflict.

 
 
Program Success Monitored By
Rose Brooks Center uses a variety of methods to monitor success among its different programs, including: 
  • Weekly documentation of action steps
  • Goal completion on the participants’ personal goal plan
  • Participant surveys documenting knowledge gained and support provided
  • Administration of the Stages of Healing Observational Instrument at assessment, mid-term and exit from programs
  • Pre-scales and post-scales of children receiving school-based services
Advocates, case managers and therapists enter outcome data into the Osnium database for each client. Designed specifically for domestic violence programs, the Osnium database allows the agency to generate aggregate client outcome reports as well as customized query reports for different demographics and programs.
Examples of Program Success  When “Cassandra” started Project SAFE in the 4th grade, she was angry and disruptive in class, but she refused to engage with her teacher, who tried to help. Then the school principal referred Cassandra to Project SAFE’s weekly support groups. Although Cassandra at first refused to interact, she soon let down her guard, and began talking.  She said that, the year before, her Dad had died of a drug overdose, and also that he had abused her mother, but that she’d been too ashamed to tell anyone these things.  This was a turning point for Cassandra.  Thanks to Project SAFE’s curriculum which includes coping with grief, anger, and sadness, and the support of her peers and staff, Cassandra learned the power of forgiveness, how to recognize and have healthy relationships, and how to find support and understanding from others. Today, Cassandra is an 8th grade honor roll student, and is facing a healthy life with opportunities.  
Description
Finding affordable housing and gaining economic self-sufficiency is key to breaking the cycle of domestic violence.
  • Housing Program participants receive housing assistance, advocacy, counseling, support groups, and home ownership education for up to two years.
  • The Economic Advocacy Program provides participants with the knowledge and skills to achieve financial wellness and gainful employment.  
Category Housing, General/Other Affordable Housing
Population Served Families, ,
Short-Term Success

  • 75% of participants will identify how their partner maintained power and control through economic abuse. 
  • 75% of participants will develop safety planning strategies that address economic abuse. 
  • 65% of participants will show increased skills in planning for their financial future as evidenced by at least one or more of the completed Economic Empowerment Action Steps.

Long-Term Success

  • 60% of participants will increase the economic resources (earned income and other sources) necessary for living in permanent housing. 
  • 80% of program participants will retain permanent housing for a minimum of one year.

Program Success Monitored By
Rose Brooks Center uses a variety of methods to monitor success among its different programs, including: 
 
  • Weekly documentation of action steps
  • Goal completion on the participants’ personal goal plan
  • Participant surveys documenting knowledge gained and support provided
  • Administration of the Stages of Healing Observational Instrument at assessment, mid-term and exit from programs
  • Pre-scales and post-scales of children receiving school-based services
 
Advocates, case managers and therapists enter outcome data into the Osnium database for each client. Designed specifically for domestic violence programs, the Osnium database allows the agency to generate aggregate client outcome reports as well as customized query reports for different demographics and programs.
Examples of Program Success

‘Hala,’ 43, came to the Rose Brooks Center, fleeing from her husband who had assaulted her.  Immediately deciding she wanted to start over again, she needed career assistance, since her husband had been controlling and had not let her work for many years.  Her Employment Advocate discussed different potential career paths which aligned with Hala’s interests and experiences. But most of all, Hala said that she loved to cook and had been volunteering as a chef’s assistant at a local church that fed the homeless.  Her Employment Advocate then helped her with her resume, job search, and interviews. While still at Rose Brooks’ shelter, Hala secured a job cooking at a local casino.  She has done so well, that now the chef has begun to ask Hala for advice on spices and recipes.  Today, Hala has  choices—either to continue upward mobility at the casino, or to enroll in a local culinary arts program.  Or both.  Because of Rose Brooks, Hala has these choices, and a new life, ahead of her.

CEO Comments

In order to achieve our mission of breaking the cycle of domestic violence we provide comprehensive services to domestic violence victims and the community. Through our three initiatives, Keeping Families Safe, Rebuilding Lives and Creating a Safer Community, Rose Brooks Center offers a continuum of care to provide a safety net and support services to domestic violence victims and to prevent future violence. Our programs reached nearly 15,000 individuals in 2015, and our reach continues to drastically grow as we provide life-saving services to more women and children in serious danger through our Lethality Assessment Program. Because of this program, law enforcement officers have a tool to help determine a victim’s risk of being killed by an abuser. Since the program’s implementation it has drastically increased our emergency hotline call volume as well as demand for all of our services.

This drastic volume increase has significantly impacted our programs and staff. The staff’s willingness to take on new roles and responsibilities and do everything possible to keep families safe, regardless of resources, money or manpower, is an inspiration to me and a true example of excellence. I am honored to work alongside these men and women each day, as we save lives and provide families hope for a better life free from violence. Our Emergency Expansion Plan seeks critical funding to increase our ability to meet the community's needs and provide long-term sustainability for the organization. We look forward to increasing the capacity of our programs, providing women and children in dangerous situations access to all of our services.

 

Executive Director/CEO
Executive Director Ms. Susan Miller
Term Start Jan 1996
Experience

Susan Miller has more than twenty years of experience in human services. She graduated second in her class with a Bachelor of Arts from North Central College in Naperville, Illinois, then went on to the University of Illinois to earn her Masters in Social Work. She did post-graduate work through Northwestern University at The Family Institute of Chicago, earning a certificate in Family Therapy.

Susan's professional experience includes a successful background in both social services and business. She established a shelter for abused women and their children in Joliet, Illinois in 1979, and remained there until 1983 when she became Customer Service Manager at First National Bank of Chicago, designing a centralized customer relations strategy for a customer base of 10,000 worldwide. In 1986, she and her husband moved to Tampa, Florida where they opened a restaurant and catering business that flourished from 1986 to 1995. At that time, they moved to Kansas City where Susan began her current role as CEO of Rose Brooks Center.
 
Since Susan assumed leadership of Rose Brooks Center in 1996, the organization has grown to a budget exceeding $5 million, employing 100 staff. Susan has received numerous community recognitions for her work at Rose Brooks Center, including serving as past president and current board member of the Missouri Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence, Vice Chair of Goodwill Industries and a member of the Core Team and Leadership Team of Safe Family Coalition. Through her visionary leadership, she has achieved expansion of capacity and services so that Rose Brooks Center can help more women and children in need. 
Co-CEO/Executive Director
Term Start
Compensation Last Year
Former CEOs
NameTerm
Elizabeth Meyer Aug 1995 - Dec 1995
Ms. Cathy Stackpole Sept 1988 - Jan 1993
Senior Staff
Title Chief Financial Officer
Experience/Biography

Dan earned his Bachelor of Science in Accounting from the University of Central Florida and is a Certified Public Accountant. Dan has over twenty years of experience in audit, accounting, financial operations and management. His accounting and finance experience includes areas such as payroll, benefits, general ledger, financial reporting, cash flow management forecasting and budgeting. He also has extensive experience with federal and state funded program compliance and contract/grant reporting.  

Dan moved to Kansas City from Florida in mid-2015, and before joining Rose Brooks Center, Dan worked as a Contractor/Consultant for other organizations such as State Street in their Financial Reporting Unit and Cochran Head and Vick, CPAs as a Contract Auditor. While in Florida, Dan was the Chief Financial Officer for the Council on Aging of Volusia in Daytona Beach, the major elder services non-profit organization where he managed the finance department and overall $7 million budget. Prior to that Dan worked for Olivari & Associates, P.A., Certified Public Accountants and Consultants as an Audit and Assurance Manager and Tax Accountant. Also in his career, Dan worked for METLIFE, Corporate Controllers Division in various roles, such as Finance and Project Management, Accounting Manager in HR Controller’s Department, Budget and Expense, and a Financial Analyst as well as other finance and accounting roles.

Title Chief Operating Officer
Experience/Biography Lisa Fleming has been with Rose Brooks since 1991 progressing through positions of Counselor/Advocate, Director of Residential Services to her present position as Chief Operating Officer. Ms. Fleming has a Bachelor of Arts from Washburn University and a Master of Social Work. Her professional memberships include the Missouri Coalition Against Domestic Violence, Safe Family Coalition and the Homeless Services Coalition. 
Title Chief Development Officer
Experience/Biography

Ms. Svoboda is responsible for all fundraising for the organization. She and her development team are successfully able to raise over $5 million per year to support the organizational costs in addition to the recent Safe Futures capital campaign necessary to renovate, enhance, and expand the agency's physical structures.  She has over 20 years of experience in fundraising, for profit and non-profit management and as well as direct services. Prior to coming to Rose Brooks Center she was the Development Director for Wayside Waifs pet shelter. She also worked previously for Rose Brooks Center providing violence prevention services through the Project SAFE program.

Staff
Paid Full-Time Staff 70
Paid Part-Time Staff 31
Volunteers 3000
Paid Contractors 0
Retention Rate 77%
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Plans & Policies
Organization Has a Fundraising Plan Yes
Organization Has a Strategic Plan Yes
Management Succession Plan Yes
Organization Policy and Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistleblower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Collaborations
  • Shared hotline with Metropolitan Family Violence Coalition 
  • Kansas City Police Department 
  • Goodwill Industries - Provides clothing to clients
  • Meeting the needs of Limited English Proficiency clients with the assistance of Mattie Rhodes and International Women’s Institute; selected by Safe Family Coalition to train other shelters
  • Legal Aid of Western Missouri 
  • Project SAFE Advocates and Therapists in 44 area schools 
  • Bridge Advocates in 8 hospitals and 11 clinics 
  • Domestic Violence Advocates in the Kansas City Municipal Court and Jackson County Order of Protection Court 
  • Domestic violence advocacy within the Kansas City, Missouri Police Department and Lethality Assessment Program partnership with four police patrols 
  • National Network to End Domestic Violence 
  • Missouri Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence
  • Safe Family Coalition 
  • Developed curriculum to expand BridgeSPAN hospital advocacy program to 24 hospitals and 22 clinics; conducted local, national and statewide trainings 
  • Safety First Initiative with MOCSA and Institute for Human Development/UMKC 
  • Allstate Foundation for Economic Empowerment and Employment curriculum, including volunteer trainers from Allstate 
  • Paige Point Townhomes - Housing 
  • KC Cares and Goppert-Trinity - Health Clinic 
  • Jackson County Prosecuting Attorney’s office 
  • Wayside Waifs for volunteer pet training and fostering and PAWS Program for pet program consultation 
  • Homeless Services Coalition of Greater Kansas City and the Continuum of Care 
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Founder's Award (honoring a female leader in the community)Annual Women's Lyceum2006
Missouri Bar Association Award for Innovative ProgramsMissouri Bar Association2005
Regional Best Practice Award for Rose Brooks Center's Transitional Housing ProgramDepartment of Housing and Urban Development2003
Volunteer Project of the YearMissouri Volunteer Association2003
Stuart Whitney AwardHomeless Services Coalition2003
Best Practice Award (honoring our Transitional Housing Economic Empowerment Program)U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development2009
Best of the Best Award (Honoring our Transitional Housing Economic Empowerment Program)U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development2009
Excellence in Nonprofit LeadershipSupport KC2010
Best of the Best Philanthropic OrganizationKC Magazine2009
Recognized as a model program for our partnership in the Safety First InitiativeOffice on Violence Against Women2013
Outstanding Leadership in Violence PreventionFutures Without Violence2012
Selected to present five different trainingsWorld Conference of Women's Shelters2012
Partnership in Safety First initiativeOffice of Violence Against Women2014
Citizen of the YearMissouri Lawyers Weekly's Women's Justice2015
Celebrating Solutions AwardMary Byron Project2015
Government Licenses
Is your organization licensed by the government? Yes
CEO Comments

Rose Brooks Center is committed to a strategic, goal-oriented management approach. All decisions affecting programs and operations are tied to the organization’s strategic plan, which is reviewed by the board of directors on a quarterly basis. To create a unified philosophy and approach throughout the organization, every staff member has a copy of Rose Brooks Center’s strategic plan, which is used as a tool in annual employee performance evaluations. As a result, we are proud to say that we achieve our goals and objectives in a timely manner, and continue to move forward in the field of domestic violence prevention and intervention.

Board Chair
Board Chair Ms. Jennifer Gille-Bacon
Company Affiliation Polsinelli
Term May 2016 to Apr 2017
Board Members
NameAffiliation
Mr. David Atterbury Whetstone Capital
Ms. Sheilahn Davis-Wyatt Community Volunteer
Ms. Colleen Dougherty Community Volunteer
Mr. Kenneth Dumas Commerce Bank
Ms. Linda Falk Friends of the Zoo
Ms. Jennifer Flandermeyer Kansas City Power and Light
Ms. Jennifer Gille-Bacon Polsinelli Shughart PC
Ms. Stacey Graves KCMO Police Department
Mr. Phil Greenfield German May PC
Ms. Colleen Hayes U.S. Bank
Ms. Colleen Hayes U.S. Bank
Ms. Gabrielle Hernandez Argus Health Systems, Inc.
Ms. Diana Keating Hallmark Cards, Inc.
Ms. Raliegh Lang Twin Financial
Ms. Lou Loescher-Junge University of Kansas Medical Center
Ms. Sally Luck Hallmark Cards, Inc.
Mr. Steve McClain American Century Investments
Ms. Ashlee Peterson HCA Midwest Health
Ms. Jan Rowe Mitchell Capital Management
Mr. Brian Schell BATS Global Markets
Ms. Virginia Stowers Community Volunteer
Ms. Sheryl Turner DST Systems, Inc.
Mr. Mel Zaiden Verizon Wireless
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 19
Hispanic/Latino 2
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 7
Female 16
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 68%
Written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 10
Standing Committees
Board Development / Board Orientation
Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Executive
Finance
Program / Program Planning
Special Events (Golf Tournament, Walk / Run, Silent Auction, Dinner / Gala)
CEO Comments Rose Brooks Center is fortunate to have a very active and diverse Board of Directors. It is this diversity of individuals and talents that allows Rose Brooks Center to continually enhance our services to victims of domestic violence. Our Board members are highly committed to breaking the cycle of domestic violence and through their vision, leadership and stewardship they are devoted to maintaining Rose Brooks Center as a leader in providing domestic violence services in the Kansas City metropolitan area. During this time of critical agency expansion, Rose Brooks Center’s board members have increased their commitment to support the organization through their time and resources in hopes of helping to expand our facility and programs into the future.
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01, 2016
Fiscal Year End June 30, 2017
Projected Revenue $5,566,858
Projected Expenses $5,566,858
Foundation Comments
  • FYE 6/30/2015, 2014: Financial data reported using the IRS Form 990.
  • FYE 6/30/2013: Financial data reported using the organization's audited financial statements.
  • Foundation/corporate revenue line item may include contributions from individuals.
Detailed Financials
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$2,752,392$4,281,790$1,058,965
Government Contributions$1,775,791$1,461,368$1,640,202
Federal----$938,756
State----$234,453
Local----$466,993
Unspecified$1,775,791$1,461,368$0
Individual Contributions----$1,521,575
$260,952$312,903$176,312
$0$0$109,413
Investment Income, Net of Losses$197,957$209,328$252,036
Membership Dues$0$0$0
Special Events$514,970$600,651$485,245
Revenue In-Kind$145,903$182,412$229,034
Other$565$10,181$25,999
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$4,828,475$4,540,677$4,512,188
Administration Expense$391,646$354,232$346,614
Fundraising Expense$589,472$621,690$503,523
Payments to Affiliates----$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.971.280.96
Program Expense/Total Expenses83%82%84%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue11%9%10%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$14,029,280$14,334,581$12,450,835
Current Assets$3,486,602$3,705,528$2,106,767
Long-Term Liabilities$0$0$0
Current Liabilities$356,967$405,573$296,363
Total Net Assets$13,672,313$13,929,008$12,154,472
Short-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities9.779.147.11
Long-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountU.S. Department of Justice $456,227 --Individual $1,035,131
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountHall Family Foundation $450,000 --Mental Health Levy $256,040
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountUnited Way of Greater Kansas City $369,294 --Victims of Crime Act $241,658
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years Yes
Organization Comments

Rose Brooks Center prides itself on being a trustworthy steward of funds entrusted in us to carry out our mission. Rose Brooks Center has worked with domestic violence victims in the Kansas City metropolitan area for over 35 years, and as a result has witnessed the impacts of domestic violence on victims and their children. We have expanded facilities and programs in the past to meet growing community needs. Construction of our current facility was completed in 2000. At that time Rose Brooks Center operated on a $1.8 million budget, serving 5,985 women and children annually. Today, our organization has grown significantly and in 2015 we provided services to over 15,000 individuals, operating on a $5.6 million budget.

 

Rose Brooks Center is recognized and respected for its best practices and responsiveness to victims of domestic violence both throughout the Kansas City Community as well as on a national basis. In fact, Rose Brooks Center maintains, for the fourth consecutive year, the maximum 4-star rating by Charity Navigator, the country’s most-renowned charity evaluator, based on our strong financial health and commitment to accountability and transparency – only 9% of the charities evaluated received this recognition. As our programs and facilities expand, Rose Brooks Center makes it a priority to remain a good fiduciary agent, making the most of the resources generously contributed to our organization.


Organization Name Rose Brooks Center, Inc.
Address PO Box 320599
Kansas City, MO 641320599
Primary Phone (816) 523-5550
Contact Email marla@rosebrooks.org
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Susan Miller
Board Chair Ms. Jennifer Gille-Bacon
Board Chair Company Affiliation Polsinelli
Year of Incorporation 1978