City Union Mission
1100 E 11th St
Kansas City MO 64106-3028
Strike Out Hunger with KC Royals GM Dayton Moore

Web and Phone Contact
Telephone (816) 474-9380
Mission Statement
City Union Mission is an evangelical Christian ministry committed to sharing the gospel and meeting the spiritual, physical, and emotional needs of men, women, and children who are poor or homeless.
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Rev. Daniel Doty
Board Chair Mr. David Langford
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired: Burns & McDonnell
History and Background
Year of Incorporation 1924
Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Revenue $11,030,354
Projected Expenses $10,952,163
Statements
Mission Statement City Union Mission is an evangelical Christian ministry committed to sharing the gospel and meeting the spiritual, physical, and emotional needs of men, women, and children who are poor or homeless.
Background Statement City Union Mission was founded by Reverend and Mrs. David Bulkley on September 15, 1924. In that year alone, the Mission provided meals to over 2,000 homeless men living on the streets. In 1927, the Bulkley's moved the Mission to the Harbor, a former brothel. The Harbor became home to hundreds of homeless men until 1940. During these years, the Bulkley's added emergency services for needy families, Sunday school, a rehabilitation farm in the Ozarks, Camp City Union Mission Camp in the Ozarks and Tot Lot, summer camps for inner-city children. In June of 1940 Reverend Bulkley died, and his widow Beulah directed the Mission until 1954, the board of directors called Reverend Maurice Vanderberg and his wife, Ruth (the Bulkley's daughter) to direct the work. Maurice created the Christian Life Program in 1954, a recovery program for homeless men. The Mission relocated in 1960 to the Boys Club Building, where the Mission operated its first youth center, providing after-school and summer programs for up to 400 inner-city children weekly. In 1972, the Mission moved to 1108 E. 10th Street, where its Men's Center is today. In 1978, the Mission opened Pilgrim House Family Shelter in response to the growing number of homeless families. By 1983, the Mission's ministries to low income and homeless families moved to the City Union Mission Family Center at 1310 Wabash. In 1985, the Mission began the Hotline for the Homeless to connect the homeless to available shelter in the city. Maurice Vanderberg retired as Executive Director on December 31, 1991. Reverend Daniel J. Doty who had been Maurice's assistant for 10 years became executive director, January 1, 1992. He holds that position today.
Impact Statement

2015 Accomplishments:

 
  • Completed construction on a 12,000-square-foot facility at our Camp facility in Warsaw, MO that will include a basketball/volleyball court, a dining room with seating for over 200 people, a full kitchen, restrooms, showers, an infirmary and living space for two cooks and two nurses!
  • Began renovation of the L. Minor Care Center, a City Union Mission facility designed to provide the special protection and programming for homeless men with physical and mental disabilities that put them at risk when in the general homeless population. Current schedule is for the facility to be operational by 2017.
  • Held our 9th Annual "Women Who've Changed the Heart of the City" honoring the most prominent of philanthropic Women who Changed the face of Kansas City which has become one of the leading philanthropic events in the Kansas City area. In total, this event has raised nearly $4.5 million and has been rated the #1 Fundraising event in KC in 2015, 2014 and 2013.
  • Served the homeless by providing approximately 250,144 meals for the hungry and provided more than 155,173 beds for the weary in 2015
  • Doors are open 365 days a year, 24 hours a day
  • Is the only shelter in Kansas City with infirmary beds for those who are ill or injured
  • In 2015, we saw approximately 11,619 individuals from the homeless community receive health screening and other medical services in our medical clinic.
Goals for 2016:
 
  • Implement a professionally-designed Major Donor program and comprised of 10 Development professionals and complete with online reporting of and scheduling of follow up contacts, individually-researched donor data and coordination by a Major Donor Officer
  • Add a professional grant writer to implement a full-fledged Foundation giving program
  • Mission leadership to discuss and generate a long range plan aimed at addressing the future of City Union Mission including current and future facility needs
  • Expand bed capacity for single women at the Family Center


Needs Statement
  • We are also raising money for the L. Minor Care Center, a City Union Mission facility expected to launch in 2017 that is designed to provide the special protection and programming for homeless men with physical and mental disabilities that put them at risk when in the general homeless population.
  • At our Family Center we are experiencing higher than normal occupancy rates in our overflow bed space.
Service Categories
Homeless Shelters
Human Services
Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash)
Areas of Service
MO - Jackson County
MO - Clay County
MO - Platte County
KS - Wyandotte County
KS - Johnson County
MO - Eastern Jackson Co
MO - Jackson County Urban Core
KS - Wyandotte County Urban Core
CEO/Executive Director/Board Chair Statement

The staff and board at City Union Mission believe in forward planning and proactively responding to opportunities in the outreach to the homeless community. Many times, opportunities can be seen as problems. Even through daily routine tasks, City Union Mission keeps its vision and direction focused on the future anticipating God working in His own way and time. The staff and board have wrestled with difficult decisions regarding the future, especially as we strive to meet the needs of the poor and homeless in the Kansas City area. We appreciate the financial and prayer support provided to City Union Mission over the past 90 plus years. Please consider how you can be a part of meeting our future needs.

City Union Mission has long held to a standard of high integrity whether that is in how we use the funds and goods donated to how we seek to help the homeless make changes from the inside out so they are equipped to live new, productive lives that bring honor and constructive change. We believe it to be self-evident that a changed life comes from such a core, spiritual change because we have seen the fruits of such a strategy for more than 90 years. We ask that you continue to pray for City Union Mission and support such a stand that may not always be popular.

Programs
Description

The purpose of the Career Development Program is to build a successful future as a contributing member of society, as a family member, as an employee and at a local church. The program is a big part of preventing the cycle of hopelessness and homelessness our clients have usually been trapped in. Career Development is seven weeks of in-depth courses and one-on-one counseling the purpose of which is to help clients gain the skills necessary to land and keep career minded, quality employment.

If the client needs additional education or training prior to entering the workforce the steps necessary to achieve this are addressed during the individual meetings. The workshops help the client determine what kind of job / career he wants to pursue. Additionally, we work with clients individually on resumes, interview skills and job search plans. If the client needs additional education or training prior to entering the workforce the steps necessary to achieve this are addressed during the individual meetings. The final step is the job search itself. This is a full-time endeavor with the client held accountable for conducting a serious and professional job search. Over 90 % of our clients land quality employment. But overall, the objective isn’t just getting a job but, instead, to prepare the person to successfully re-enter the work force with the skills necessary to build a career.

Category Employment, General/Other Employment, General/Other
Population Served Homeless, Adults,
Short-Term Success

A majority of clients come to the City Union Mission's recovery programs unemployed. In addition, many don't possess the skills required to secure gainful employment. One key goal of Career Development is to teach clients the skills and strategies necessary to secure employment in a very competitive job hunting environment. After completion of the rigorous 7-week curriculum clients begin the full-time job search process. Over the last 3 years more than 90 % of the clients who complete Career Development secure living wage jobs in their chosen field while on the program.

Long-Term Success

Each of our program clients gets the benefit of our Career Development program. The Career Development Department works to help the client gain and keep gainful, long-term employment. This is achieved through classes, one-on-one career counseling sessions, expert volunteers and hard work on the client’s part. Long-term success is defined as maintaining a living wage employment 1 year after completion of one of the long-term programs. Over the past 3 years, Career Development has achieved an 80% success rate.

Program Success Monitored By

The Career Development and aftercare departments maintain ongoing contact with Program graduates as much as is possible. The percentages stated above are derived from status updates received from past graduates. Career Development also monitors and analyzes qualitative success as well, primarily through client meetings and follow up. The department is diligent to stay up-to-date on hiring and employment trends in the marketplace to help keep career counseling, materials and job search strategies current.

Examples of Program Success City Union Mission client story: After struggling for decades with alcoholism and subsequent homelessness, 55-year- old Rick knew the only solution was a long-term in residence program. His pastor suggested the Christian Life Program. He graduated in March 2015. With his background in the custodial business, humble Christian demeanor and skills learned on the Program, Rick secured a job at a medical clinic. One of the questions asked in the interview was one he had practiced answering in the Mission’s Career Development coursework: What makes you different than the other candidates? “Because of my Christian work ethic everything I do is for the glory of God,” Rick replied. “And that benefits you and me as well.” Rick got the job. As of earlier this year Rick was still employed at the clinic, living in his own place and attending church on a regular basis. Soon after Rick secured the job, he got his own place, driver’s license and a car. Rick is sober and back in his grown son’s lives.
Description
In 2016, we are planning and seeking approval of a revamp of the program that would add a point system that awards extra food and household item vouchers for productive accomplishments.
 
In 2015, Emergency Assistance provided 1,852 food orders to 4,030 individuals, 72,713 items of clothing and  household items for to 2,135 households.
 
The core objective of the Emergency Assistance program is to reach out to those in the community that are "at risk" of becoming homeless.  Ultimately, homelessness prevention is the goal.  The Mission provides extensive, compassionate service to the low-income community. Relief efforts include the distribution of food, clothing, school supplies, household items, utility assistance, case management, help to find affordable housing, Life Skills classes and services to home-bound elderly and disabled people. 

During the Thanksgiving and Christmas season, Mission supporters collect and donate thousands of pounds of holiday food for the low-income community. An established network of churches throughout Kansas City helps the Mission distribute this food to about 350 families who receive this bounteous feast.

Also, we have a Christmas Adoption Program in which we work with generous individuals, churches, businesses, etc. to adopt low-income and homeless families and men, nursing home residents, children at our Youth Center and Jackson County Jail inmates. With the help of volunteers, we distribute over 12,000 new items and 160 food baskets during the Christmas season.
Category Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food Distribution
Population Served Homeless, ,
Short-Term Success
Program Short-Term Success:
  • Promotes healthy choices available for needed change including entering long-term program.
  • Provides accountability for client as new habits and structure is implemented in case management.
  • Provides a safe and clean environment for client to begin new choices.
  • Provides an atmosphere of respect and responsibility motivating to the client.
  • Provides training in life skills including decision making, communication skills, and financial management.
Long-Term Success
Long-Term Success will include:
  • Living in permanent, affordable, safe housing with sufficient income to meet budgeted, basic needs and, if necessary, a plan for paying off debt.
  • Exhibiting responsibility for material possessions/good stewardship.
  • Reconciled in life to God, family and community.
  • Taking advantage of tools for change.
  • Accessing the power outside oneself change.
  • Life skills learned and applied.
  • Sets priorities and makes responsible decisions.
Program Success Monitored By
Program is monitored by:
  • Case management records
  • Sufficient length of stay and cooperation in community safety.
  • Appropriate move-out plan including employment, housing, and /or long-term program.
Examples of Program Success
Examples of Program Success:
  • Attendance in life skill classes has more than doubled in the last year.
  • Increased numbers of chronic homeless placed in affordable housing in last two years.
  • Continued collaboration with mental health services to connect clients with needed help.

Client story:

Shirley came in for assistance and got a surprise invitation to our upgraded Community New Life Program. She received guidance, encouragement, and incentives to keep her moving forward toward goals and growth in life. She also gained new friends and hope. She worked at record speeds and completed our 1 year program in 6 weeks. She was so grateful and excited, her squealing response was "This is the first time I've ever completed anything! Thank you so much for this program!"
Description The Family Shelter at City Union Mission is a haven for families and single women. There are many conditions that cause families to become homeless, including financial setbacks, addiction, family violence and mental illness. The Family Shelter provides homeless families a safe place to stay, nutritious meals, spiritual counsel and case management to address and help resolve some of the issues they face.

Programs and services include shelter, food, case management, counseling, and LifeSkill classes such as Budget, Dealing with Feelings, Conflict Management, etc.  Participants can be on the program as long as needed and staff identify that workable progress is being made.  After-school programs and day care needs of clients are provided.  Health screening services are also provided.
Category Housing, General/Other Homeless Shelter
Population Served Homeless, Adults,
Short-Term Success In 2015, the Family Shelter provided 42,350 beds and 85,155 meals to homeless families.
Long-Term Success As a shelter, as distinct from a long-term recovery program such as the Mission's New Life Program, the emphasis is really on allowing the homeless family to find stability and security and to begin to consider their need for a more intensive structure.
Program Success Monitored By The Family Shelter serves primarily as a feed program to our New Life Program, a long-term recovery program. So other than counting bed-nights and meals served, there is not many more statistics tracked currently but expect more by 2016.
Examples of Program Success

Shari, a military veteran and mother of 3 adult children, was always the one her family turned to when they needed help. But she got sick and was unable to work for a while.

Shari learned her illness was chronic and progressive and she was unable to return to work. She lost her apartment and lived in her car before her disability assistance began. She then took in her 2 young grandkids when her daughter couldn’t care for them. She had another financial setback and couldn’t afford the house they were in.

Shari and her grandchildren came to the Mission. Shari and her grandkids received wholesome meals, quiet, safe to sleep as a family unit which helped her emerge from the fog of homelessness. She is now taking some classes we offer that help break the bond of homelessness.

Because her illness prevents her from working, we’re teaching her how to better manage her disability income to care of herself and grandkids. But she’s confident she’ll be able to live on her own again very soon.
Description Each day, dozens of homeless men come to the City Union Mission Men's Center for clothing, food and a temporary refuge from life on the streets. Here they find people who care about them, who listen to them and work with them to meet their physical and spiritual needs.

Programs and services include shelter, food, case management, counseling, and LifeSkill classes such as Budget, Dealing with Feelings, Conflict Management, and other strategies targeted to break the cycle of becoming homeless.  Participants can be on the program as long as needed and staff identify that workable progress is being made.  After-school programs and day care needs of clients are provided.  Health screening services are also provided.
Category Housing, General/Other Homeless Shelter
Population Served Homeless, Adults,
Short-Term Success In 2015, the Men's Shelter provided 110,653 beds and 157,090 meals to homeless men.
Long-Term Success As a shelter, as distinct from a long-term recovery program such as the Mission's New Life Program, the emphasis is really on allowing the homeless man to find stability and security and to begin to consider his need for a more intensive structure.
Program Success Monitored By The Men's Shelter serves primarily as a feeder program to our long-term recovery program for men. So other than counting bed-nights and meals served, there is not many more statistics tracked currently but expect more by 2016.
Examples of Program Success

Penny’s ex-husband, Mark, became an alcoholic about 10 years into their marriage and only over time did she recognize the signs: agitation, deception, DUIs and lost jobs. “After a while you realize you’re dealing with full-blown alcoholism,” she says.

Mark tried various treatment and rehabilitation programs. “There were so many lies,” she shares. Finally, after nearly 25 years, she’d had enough. “You realize that your whole life, your whole marriage, everything about you revolves around alcoholism. I said to myself, ‘I’m not doing this anymore.’” She told Mark he had to go.

Mark came to City Union Mission where he joined our Christian Life Program. He has been sober for more than a year and is now a student in our Servant Leadership Institute where he is training for a career in ministry. “The Mission gave him a place to go with a roof over his head and food and it now offers him the hope of meaningful work; not just menial labor to make ends meet, but employment where he feels like he is making a contribution to society and doing good within doing good within God’s will,” Penny says. “I thank God every day that Mark is safe and has a direction to go.”

Description Families and single women at the Mission's Family Shelter can enter the four- to eight-month New Life Program that offers rehabilitation to whole families. Members attend Bible study, local churches and have regular counseling sessions. Life Skills courses guide each person toward a healthier lifestyle. Families live in the shelter while parents and children alike stabilize and prepare to move into permanent housing.

Provides basic life necessities and instruction through practical Life Skills Courses, counseling, mentors, recovery groups, spiritual and academic development, job assignments and readiness courses, monitored home and financial management and church involvement.
 
A new component is that now staff from Truman Medical Center Behavioral Health each week assess clients in the New Life Program, evaluating for mental health issues.
Category Human Services, General/Other Human Services, General/Other
Population Served Adults, ,
Short-Term Success Desired Client outcomes 6-7 months: (partial list) • Handles obstacles appropriately before they become crisis • Identifies and commits to written prioritized goals • Pursuing realistic godly solutions to life’s daily problems using knowledge of life skills • Responsibly cares for personal property and resources • Acquires good housing reference through CUM • Demonstrates a work ethic while beginning employment in a career path that provides a quality of life • Establishes and follows a personalized financial plan that meets needs and pays off debt. • Completed educational goals and job training
Long-Term Success
The New Life Program is organized by outcome measurement with the following long term desired client outcomes one year out:
• Evidences self management
• Acquires and keeps affordable stable safe housing
• Retains successful employment record
• Acquires financial stability
• Maintains physical health for self and family
• Acquired educational level that will provide desired quality of lif
Program Success Monitored By
• Bi-Monthly evaluations with staff team
• Work therapy supervisor evaluations
• Self evaluations and survey
• Case management records
• Career follow-up program staff
Examples of Program Success

We were pretty much embraced and welcomed in with open arms. Every morning there were classes. I enjoyed them. I loved them. The things that we learned and picked up there, we apply them to our lives now. They gave you extra time if you needed it to get things done to get yourself back on your feet. The place will forever hold a place in my heart because of what they allowed me and my family to do and what they allowed me and my family to just get our lives restored.

I dare not adventure to where our lives would be and what would have happened to us and our kids. I know it would not have been a good outcome. Being able to resume independent living, it’s a reason to smile. We’re working. We’re doing great. The kids are fine. They’re happy. They’re doing great.

City Union Mission allowed us to restore our lives, strengthen our faith and fulfill our dreams. We thank God every day and the entire time the City Union Mission was there in our time of need.

Description This long-term program is available to men who have responded to the gospel and want to grow as Christians and as responsible members of the community. Daily Bible classes, individual and group counseling, drug and alcohol recovery, job assignments and life skills courses are required. Attendance at area churches and opportunities for further education make up this comprehensive one-year program. The Christian Life Program is also available at Opportunity Farm, an extension of City Union Mission, which is located in the Ozarks near Warsaw, Missouri.

Provides basic life necessities and instruction through practical Life Skills Courses, counseling, mentors, recovery groups, spiritual and academic development, job assignments and readiness courses, monitored home and church involvement.
 
A new component is that now staff from Truman Medical Center Behavioral Health each week assess clients in the New Life Program, evaluating for mental health issues.
Category Housing, General/Other Homeless Shelter
Population Served Homeless, ,
Short-Term Success
Program Short-Term Success:
  • Improved academic ability, having an appropriate reading and writing level
  • Taking responsibility for personal health and hygiene
  • Free of alcohol and illegal and/or harmful drug use including nicotine for six months
  • Exhibit functional work ethic including punctuality, dependability, and proper care of equipment
  • Morally upright
  • Willingness to participate in community, positive influence toward others in program
Long-Term Success
Program Long-Term Success:
  • Client experiences a change in their world view, from a taker to a giver, from consumption to provision, with an overall outcome of becoming a contributing member of the Christian community.
  • Evidence of productive member of the Christian community Gainfully employed or actively involved in continuing education.
  • Free of primary life-controlling issues identified during the mission program
  • Secured stabilized housing
  • Maintaining healthy relationships
  • Achieving financial stability * Involved in a local church
Program Success Monitored By
Program Success Monitored By:
  • Bi-monthly evaluations with staff team
  • Work therapy supervisor evaluations
  • Self-evaluations and survey
  • Case management records
  • Career follow-up program staff
Examples of Program Success

When Michael Merritt arrived on our doorstep that frigid January night, he was sick and malnourished. We gave him a hot shower, a filling meal and a warm bed. He saw one of our counselors. Then, at our free medical clinic, we helped him get his diabetes under control.

“I stuck to myself and didn’t talk to anybody,” Michael says of those first few weeks. But before long, he began to change. Through the Mission’s Job Hunter’s program, he landed a job.

By summer Michael had saved enough to leave the Mission, but after relapsing on drugs he returned for help. Michael experienced a dramatic transformation. He spent his days in study, life-skills classes and work therapy and received counseling, educational assistance and job training. Michael overcame his drug addiction. About a year later, he graduated a new man, ready to start the next phase of his journey.

Description In School Year 2015-16, the City Corps program of the VYC provided more than 2,239 hours of tutoring sessions to at-risk children.
 
Children, ages 7 to 17, participate each week in Bible study, organized play, crafts, drama and homework tutoring at the Vanderberg Youth Center (VYC). Opportunities for growth abound as boys and girls learn through Life Skills classes, computer training, cooking and sewing classes, woodworking class, field trips, mission trips and other activities. The youth center staff and volunteers act as role models to the children who attend, helping them to develop responsible and godly attitudes toward themselves, their families and the community. Children living at the Family Shelter also participate in VYC activities.

Provides recreation, academic and spiritual education, and entertainment for youth in the shelter and in the community in an after school program.
Category Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years), ,
Short-Term Success
Short-term outcomes  include: Growing awareness of desired behavioral changes, faith development, fitness and health improvement, academic performance, evidence of social and emotional health.
 
Understands exercise is part of a balanced lifestyle
Understands healthy eating is part of a balanced lifestyle
Displays good sportsmanhip
Develop plan to address deficient skills
Desire to study for tests/projects
Understands and generally follows rules of VYC
Participates positively in group counseling
Able to hear and respond positively from Discipline
Can explain spiritual growth
Regularly Attends Church 
Long-Term Success
Outcomes include: productive member of the community, participates as peer leader, completes secondary education.
 
Makes physical activity part of their lifestyle
Makes healthy eating part of their lifestyle
Exhibits self-control and big picture thinking in competition.
“B” or higher grade average
Positive relationships with teachers
Educational Goals
Career Goals
Self-Motivated Study Skills
Respects authority
Displays good manners
Live peaceably in community
Able to resolve conflict
Devotional Life
Prayer Life
Spiritual Goals/Maturity
Active Involvement in Church
Program Success Monitored By Measured Indicators of each outcome, participation on sports teams, input in group discussions, self assessment, Reading levels, Academic Record forms, evidence of conflict management.
Examples of Program Success

"Kevin" was being expelled from Lincoln Prep for his failing grades in the 2014-2015 school year. He had given up and did not care about anything. Kevin lives alone with his grandmother and has so since his mother passed away when he was six. Our intervention plan for Kevin was counseling once a week, individual tutoring four days a week, and parent and teacher visits every quarter. Kevin ended the school year with 5 A's and one C. Kevin's desire was to return to Lincoln so we went to the school and talked to the principal and counselor. They checked Kevin's grades and agreed to allow him back. We took an application to his grandmother to fill out and we returned it to the school. Kevin is looking forward to being back at his old school with his old friends. He is very proud of his grades and improvement and we are, too.

CEO Comments
Updates for 2016 include:
  • Initiation of a Mentorship program for men in our long-term recovery program. It connects men that are struggling some with established men in the community, some even in leadership roles. The role is mostly as a friend or encourager but also includes some insight and support with problem solving and counseling.
Executive Director/CEO
Executive Director Rev. Daniel Doty
Term Start Mar 1992
Experience
Reverend Daniel J. Doty was born in South Rockwood, Michigan, March 10, 1954 and married August 7, 1976 to Evangeline Doty (Vannie). Reverend Doty has four children ages 13-22. He is a graduate of Moody Bible Institute with a BA and Master, Arts from Calvary Bible College. Reverend Doty is also a graduate of Capital Bible Seminary with a Master of Divinity and Master of Theology. Reverend Doty is a member of Downtown Rotary and the KC Chamber of Commerce. Reverend Doty's career at City Union Mission began in 1978, when he served as Chaplain and Assistant to the Superintendent. He then served as Chaplain, Central Union Mission, Washington, D.C from 1981-1983. He rejoined City Union Mission in 1983 and served as Assistant to the Superintendent and Superintendent, City Union Mission, Kansas City, Missouri until January 1, 1992 when he was appointed Executive Director.
 
Dan and wife Vannie are avid horse lovers and keep a small stable (7 horses) at their rural home near Trimble, Missouri. They host clients at their home for hayrides, bonfires and cookouts.  All of their children, four daughters and one son, are married and out of the home. Dan serves other capacities including the Tri-County Ambulance Board and the Rotary Club 13 of Kansas City, the area’s oldest Rotary Club. Dan has been a member at Emmanuel Bible Church in Smithville, Missouri for more than 20 years.
Former CEOs
NameTerm
Beulah Bulkley Jan 1940 - Dec 1954
Mr. Maurice Vanderburg Jan 1954 - Dec 1991
Senior Staff
Title Chief Operations Officer/Associate Executive Director Physical Operations
Experience/Biography Jon Capp, Associate Executive Director Physical Operations has been a staff member for 9 years. He attended Maple Woods Community College with an emphasis in Business Management, John Brown University with an emphasis in Broadcasting, Devry University with an emphasis in Telecommunications, completed Novell Certified Network Administrator training and completed A+ Computer Systems Training. Jon has 16 years business management experience, 6 years Information Systems and Telecommunications management experience and 10 plus years property management experience. He is a member of the Downtown Community Task Force and Paseo West Neighborhood Coalition and an Elder and Board Member at Sherwood Bible Church.
Title Chief Development Officer/Associate Executive Director of Development
Experience/Biography Dennis Chapman, Associate Executive Director Community Development has worked in Christian Education for 28 years of which 24 years were in Administration. He has a Bachelor Degree from Tennessee Temple University and has done Masters work at Kansas University. He is a member of Professional Photographers of America and American Association of Christian Schools (Administrator Certificate).
Title Chief Programs and Administration Officer/Associate Executive Director of Programs and Administration
Experience/Biography Lorraine Minor has been on staff since 1980 in various positions in Program Management. She is a graduate of University of Missouri at Columbia with a Bachelor of Science in Education and a Masters of Occupational Education. She did advanced work on a PhD. at Kansas State University in Curriculum Development. Prior to coming to the Mission, Lorraine was instructor at Central Missouri State University for 5 years, a consultant for the Missouri Department of Education for three years, in a church related ministry for 4 years and a classroom teacher in a vocational center. Lorraine has been a board member and officer of the Association of Gospel Rescue Missions for the past 8 years, a member of Christian Management Association, and an active member of church and community.
Staff
Paid Full-Time Staff 113
Paid Part-Time Staff 33
Volunteers 326
Paid Contractors 0
Retention Rate 71%
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Semi-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Semi-Annually
Plans & Policies
Organization Has a Fundraising Plan Yes
Organization Has a Strategic Plan Yes
Management Succession Plan Yes
Organization Policy and Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistleblower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Collaborations

Homeless Services Coalition (providing Hotline for the Homeless, board leadership, committee work, Annual Mayor's Report). Mid-America Assistance Coalition (homeless statistics) Downtown Council Human Services Committee, Harvesters, FoodBank USA, Swope Community Health Partners, Kansas City University of Medicine and Bioscience, Truman Behavioral Health and YMCA (Client assistance), Heard My Cry, Paseo West, Hyde Park, Independence Plaza, and Pendleton Heights Neighborhood Associations.

Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Evangelical Council of Financial Accountability - Member1983
External Assessment and Accreditations
Assessment/AccreditationYear
Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability (ECFA)2015
Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance2016
American Camping Association (ACA) - Accreditation2015
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Certificate of Achievement - Gold StandardHomeless Services Coalition2003
Government Licenses
Is your organization licensed by the government? No
CEO Comments

A percentage of the homeless population have special needs for which there is currently no dedicated facility in the Kansas City area. Those homeless who have mental health issues and/or physical challenges have special needs and unique vulnerabilities that usually create for them an especially stressful living circumstance.

Of an increasing concern, Kansas City's homeless struggle not only to find shelter but a portion have mental health and/or physical challenges. Their special challenges are made even more difficult because they are grouped with the rest of the homeless population. Currently there is no facility dedicated to address this need.
 
The good news is that City Union Mission is preparing such a facility named the (Lorraine) Minor Care Center. A separate, stand-alone facility, the Minor Care Center will have ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) elevators, restrooms, and other accommodations. It will also restricted access to just such clients and the Mission staff who at the facility will provide its clients programs and services designed just for them.
 
City Union Mission has long held to a standard of high integrity whether that be in how we use the funds and goods donated to how we seek to help the homeless make changes from the inside out so they are equipped to live new, productive lives that bring honor and constructive change. We believe it to be self-evident that a changed life comes from such a core, spiritual change because we have seen the fruits of such a strategy for more than 90 years. We ask that you continue to pray for City Union Mission and support such a stand that may not always be popular.
Board Chair
Board Chair Mr. David Langford
Company Affiliation Retired: Burns & McDonnell
Term Jan 2016 to Dec 2017
Email david.langford0301@gmail.com
Board Members
NameAffiliation
Mr. Jack Austin Retired, KC School District
Ms. Myrtle Bailey Cohen-Esrey Companies
Mr. Mike Beehler Burns & McDonnell
Mrs. Sheri Blauwiekel Black & Veatch
Ms. Lisa Cambridge Kansas City University of Medicine & Biosciences
Mr. Kerry Classen Oracle
Mr. James E Ewan McElligott, Ewan, Hall & Kimminau P.C.
Mr. Maceo Gray Retired: Bendix Corporation/Allied Signal
Mr. Paul Johnson Retired: Swiss Reinsurance America Corporation
Mr. David Langford Retired: Burns & McDonnell Engineering Company, Inc.
Mr. Kenneth L. Riedemann Woodland Investers, LLC; Managing Member
Mr. Cedar Robinson Warner Robinson LLC, Corporate Tax Consultant
Mr. Keith Rogers Land Specialties Manufacturing; Vice President
Mr. Mark Sewalson Wells Fargo Advisors
Mr. Pat Shelley Electrical Associates
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 12
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 12
Female 3
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 63%
Written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 65%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 10
Standing Committees
Board Development / Board Orientation
Building
Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Endowment
Executive
Finance
Human Resources / Personnel
Membership
Building
Advisory Board / Advisory Council
Trusteeship
Advisory Board Members
NameAffiliation
Mr. Nathan Anderson Harbinger Property Group, LLC
Mr. Steve Duxbury Black & Veatch
Mr. Jon Erickson Black & Veatch
Mr. Glen Gusewelle Diversified Consulting Inc.
Mr. Scott Nehrbass Foulston Siefkin LLP
Ms. Julie Thompson Henderson Engineers, Inc.
Mr. Everett L. Vaughn Comfort Sales, Co-Owner
Mr. Hal Wood Advisory Management Services
CEO Comments

Our board is comprised of up to 17 business men and women. It has consistently been a group of committed individuals with a true heart for our ministry. Every board meeting begins with one of our clients sharing their 'story'. It could be a man from the streets or a single mother with children. This keeps even our board excited to be a part of the ministry.

City Union Mission has long held to a standard of high integrity whether that be in how we use the funds and goods donated to how we seek to help the homeless make changes from the inside out so they are equipped to live new, productive lives that bring honor and constructive change. We believe it to be self-evident that a changed life comes from such a core, spiritual change because we have seen the fruits of such a strategy for more than 90 years. We ask that you continue to pray for City Union Mission and support such a stand that may not always be popular.
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Oct 01, 2015
Fiscal Year End Sept 30, 2016
Projected Revenue $11,030,354
Projected Expenses $10,952,163
Endowment Value $1,215,261
Spending Policy Income Only
IRS Letter of Exemption
Foundation Comments
  • FYE 9/30/2015, 2014: Financial data reported using the IRS Form 990.
  • FYE 9/30/2013:  Financial data reported using the organization's audited financial statements. 
  • Foundation/Corporation revenue line item may include contributions from individuals

 

 
Detailed Financials
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$9,977,068$10,577,514$2,126,960
Government Contributions$0$0$0
Federal----$0
State----$0
Local----$0
Unspecified$0$0$0
Individual Contributions----$6,339,608
$0$0$0
$89,596$105,805$2,324,602
Investment Income, Net of Losses$682,526$288,411$301,536
Membership Dues$0$0$0
Special Events$756,595$79,492$223,151
Revenue In-Kind$5,696,422$4,144,806$2,406,696
Other$64,158$51,603$23,523
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$11,553,551$10,214,397$10,032,847
Administration Expense$960,479$918,921$996,310
Fundraising Expense$1,214,962$1,225,867$2,091,389
Payments to Affiliates----$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.261.231.05
Program Expense/Total Expenses84%83%76%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue11%12%24%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$34,129,439$31,989,570$28,725,052
Current Assets$2,177,228$4,852,200$1,840,536
Long-Term Liabilities$75,490$92,235$83,216
Current Liabilities$494,634$497,823$509,106
Total Net Assets$33,559,315$31,399,512$28,132
Short-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities4.409.753.62
Long-Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountAnonymous $983,047 -- --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountAnonymous $800,000 -- --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountAnonymous $516,940 -- --
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Campaign Purpose In final fundraising phase of a multipurpose building at our camp for at-risk, inner city youth. Includes gymnasium (for lightning/bad weather days) with full-size basketball court, activity rooms (crafts, etc.) and dining hall /kitchen.
Goal $3,949,503.00
Dates Jan 2014 to June 2016
Amount Raised to Date $2,659,097.00 as of May 2016
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years No
Organization Comments

We are audited every year by the national firm Clifton Larson Allen (www.cliftonlarsonallen.com) and we submit that yearly audit to the Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability (www.ecfa.org).

 
Even with some years in which the greater Kansas City area economy (and the US economy at large) was very weak, we are grateful we have been able to meet or exceed our budget in the last 8 fiscal years through 2014.

 

We are currently adding enhancements to our annual event, Women Who've Changed the Heart of the City, which has raised nearly $4.5 million since it's inception. This event has been the #1 Fundraising event in the Kansas City area in 2015, 2014 and 2013 according to the Independent Magazine.
 
 
We have added some new events and we are beginning to launch a new, robust Major Donor program we trust will help provide City Union Mission the funding needed to carry the already large outlay needed to supply the approximately 74% of the shelter beds in the Kansas City area.
 
Organization Name City Union Mission
Address 1100 E 11th St
Kansas City, MO 641063028
Primary Phone (816) 474-9380
CEO/Executive Director Rev. Daniel Doty
Board Chair Mr. David Langford
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired: Burns & McDonnell
Year of Incorporation 1924